Quantum Money and Bitcoin | Markshire Crypto

Technical: Taproot: Why Activate?

This is a follow-up on https://old.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/hqzp14/technical_the_path_to_taproot_activation/
Taproot! Everybody wants it!! But... you might ask yourself: sure, everybody else wants it, but why would I, sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, want it? Surely I can be better than everybody else because I swapped XXX fiat for Bitcoin unlike all those nocoiners?
And it is important for you to know the reasons why you, o sovereign Bitcoiner, would want Taproot activated. After all, your nodes (or the nodes your wallets use, which if you are SPV, you hopefully can pester to your wallet vendoimplementor about) need to be upgraded in order for Taproot activation to actually succeed instead of becoming a hot sticky mess.
First, let's consider some principles of Bitcoin.
I'm sure most of us here would agree that the above are very important principles of Bitcoin and that these are principles we would not be willing to remove. If anything, we would want those principles strengthened (especially the last one, financial privacy, which current Bitcoin is only sporadically strong with: you can get privacy, it just requires effort to do so).
So, how does Taproot affect those principles?

Taproot and Your /Coins

Most HODLers probably HODL their coins in singlesig addresses. Sadly, switching to Taproot would do very little for you (it gives a mild discount at spend time, at the cost of a mild increase in fee at receive time (paid by whoever sends to you, so if it's a self-send from a P2PKH or bech32 address, you pay for this); mostly a wash).
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash, so the Taproot output spends 12 bytes more; spending from a P2WPKH requires revealing a 32-byte public key later, which is not needed with Taproot, and Taproot signatures are about 9 bytes smaller than P2WPKH signatures, but the 32 bytes plus 9 bytes is divided by 4 because of the witness discount, so it saves about 11 bytes; mostly a wash, it increases blockweight by about 1 virtual byte, 4 weight for each Taproot-output-input, compared to P2WPKH-output-input).
However, as your HODLings grow in value, you might start wondering if multisignature k-of-n setups might be better for the security of your savings. And it is in multisignature that Taproot starts to give benefits!
Taproot switches to using Schnorr signing scheme. Schnorr makes key aggregation -- constructing a single public key from multiple public keys -- almost as trivial as adding numbers together. "Almost" because it involves some fairly advanced math instead of simple boring number adding, but hey when was the last time you added up your grocery list prices by hand huh?
With current P2SH and P2WSH multisignature schemes, if you have a 2-of-3 setup, then to spend, you need to provide two different signatures from two different public keys. With Taproot, you can create, using special moon math, a single public key that represents your 2-of-3 setup. Then you just put two of your devices together, have them communicate to each other (this can be done airgapped, in theory, by sending QR codes: the software to do this is not even being built yet, but that's because Taproot hasn't activated yet!), and they will make a single signature to authorize any spend from your 2-of-3 address. That's 73 witness bytes -- 18.25 virtual bytes -- of signatures you save!
And if you decide that your current setup with 1-of-1 P2PKH / P2WPKH addresses is just fine as-is: well, that's the whole point of a softfork: backwards-compatibility; you can receive from Taproot users just fine, and once your wallet is updated for Taproot-sending support, you can send to Taproot users just fine as well!
(P2WPKH and P2WSH -- SegWit v0 -- addresses start with bc1q; Taproot -- SegWit v1 --- addresses start with bc1p, in case you wanted to know the difference; in bech32 q is 0, p is 1)
Now how about HODLers who keep all, or some, of their coins on custodial services? Well, any custodial service worth its salt would be doing at least 2-of-3, or probably something even bigger, like 11-of-15. So your custodial service, if it switched to using Taproot internally, could save a lot more (imagine an 11-of-15 getting reduced from 11 signatures to just 1!), which --- we can only hope! --- should translate to lower fees and better customer service from your custodial service!
So I think we can say, very accurately, that the Bitcoin principle --- that YOU are in control of your money --- can only be helped by Taproot (if you are doing multisignature), and, because P2PKH and P2WPKH remain validly-usable addresses in a Taproot future, will not be harmed by Taproot. Its benefit to this principle might be small (it mostly only benefits multisignature users) but since it has no drawbacks with this (i.e. singlesig users can continue to use P2WPKH and P2PKH still) this is still a nice, tidy win!
(even singlesig users get a minor benefit, in that multisig users will now reduce their blockchain space footprint, so that fees can be kept low for everybody; so for example even if you have your single set of private keys engraved on titanium plates sealed in an airtight box stored in a safe buried in a desert protected by angry nomads riding giant sandworms because you're the frickin' Kwisatz Haderach, you still gain some benefit from Taproot)
And here's the important part: if P2PKH/P2WPKH is working perfectly fine with you and you decide to never use Taproot yourself, Taproot will not affect you detrimentally. First do no harm!

Taproot and Your Contracts

No one is an island, no one lives alone. Give and you shall receive. You know: by trading with other people, you can gain expertise in some obscure little necessity of the world (and greatly increase your productivity in that little field), and then trade the products of your expertise for necessities other people have created, all of you thereby gaining gains from trade.
So, contracts, which are basically enforceable agreements that facilitate trading with people who you do not personally know and therefore might not trust.
Let's start with a simple example. You want to buy some gewgaws from somebody. But you don't know them personally. The seller wants the money, you want their gewgaws, but because of the lack of trust (you don't know them!! what if they're scammers??) neither of you can benefit from gains from trade.
However, suppose both of you know of some entity that both of you trust. That entity can act as a trusted escrow. The entity provides you security: this enables the trade, allowing both of you to get gains from trade.
In Bitcoin-land, this can be implemented as a 2-of-3 multisignature. The three signatories in the multisgnature would be you, the gewgaw seller, and the escrow. You put the payment for the gewgaws into this 2-of-3 multisignature address.
Now, suppose it turns out neither of you are scammers (whaaaat!). You receive the gewgaws just fine and you're willing to pay up for them. Then you and the gewgaw seller just sign a transaction --- you and the gewgaw seller are 2, sufficient to trigger the 2-of-3 --- that spends from the 2-of-3 address to a singlesig the gewgaw seller wants (or whatever address the gewgaw seller wants).
But suppose some problem arises. The seller gave you gawgews instead of gewgaws. Or you decided to keep the gewgaws but not sign the transaction to release the funds to the seller. In either case, the escrow is notified, and if it can sign with you to refund the funds back to you (if the seller was a scammer) or it can sign with the seller to forward the funds to the seller (if you were a scammer).
Taproot helps with this: like mentioned above, it allows multisignature setups to produce only one signature, reducing blockchain space usage, and thus making contracts --- which require multiple people, by definition, you don't make contracts with yourself --- is made cheaper (which we hope enables more of these setups to happen for more gains from trade for everyone, also, moon and lambos).
(technology-wise, it's easier to make an n-of-n than a k-of-n, making a k-of-n would require a complex setup involving a long ritual with many communication rounds between the n participants, but an n-of-n can be done trivially with some moon math. You can, however, make what is effectively a 2-of-3 by using a three-branch SCRIPT: either 2-of-2 of you and seller, OR 2-of-2 of you and escrow, OR 2-of-2 of escrow and seller. Fortunately, Taproot adds a facility to embed a SCRIPT inside a public key, so you can have a 2-of-2 Taprooted address (between you and seller) with a SCRIPT branch that can instead be spent with 2-of-2 (you + escrow) OR 2-of-2 (seller + escrow), which implements the three-branched SCRIPT above. If neither of you are scammers (hopefully the common case) then you both sign using your keys and never have to contact the escrow, since you are just using the escrow public key without coordinating with them (because n-of-n is trivial but k-of-n requires setup with communication rounds), so in the "best case" where both of you are honest traders, you also get a privacy boost, in that the escrow never learns you have been trading on gewgaws, I mean ewww, gawgews are much better than gewgaws and therefore I now judge you for being a gewgaw enthusiast, you filthy gewgawer).

Taproot and Your Contracts, Part 2: Cryptographic Boogaloo

Now suppose you want to buy some data instead of things. For example, maybe you have some closed-source software in trial mode installed, and want to pay the developer for the full version. You want to pay for an activation code.
This can be done, today, by using an HTLC. The developer tells you the hash of the activation code. You pay to an HTLC, paying out to the developer if it reveals the preimage (the activation code), or refunding the money back to you after a pre-agreed timeout. If the developer claims the funds, it has to reveal the preimage, which is the activation code, and you can now activate your software. If the developer does not claim the funds by the timeout, you get refunded.
And you can do that, with HTLCs, today.
Of course, HTLCs do have problems:
Fortunately, with Schnorr (which is enabled by Taproot), we can now use the Scriptless Script constuction by Andrew Poelstra. This Scriptless Script allows a new construction, the PTLC or Pointlocked Timelocked Contract. Instead of hashes and preimages, just replace "hash" with "point" and "preimage" with "scalar".
Or as you might know them: "point" is really "public key" and "scalar" is really a "private key". What a PTLC does is that, given a particular public key, the pointlocked branch can be spent only if the spender reveals the private key of the given public key to you.
Another nice thing with PTLCs is that they are deniable. What appears onchain is just a single 2-of-2 signature between you and the developemanufacturer. It's like a magic trick. This signature has no special watermarks, it's a perfectly normal signature (the pledge). However, from this signature, plus some datta given to you by the developemanufacturer (known as the adaptor signature) you can derive the private key of a particular public key you both agree on (the turn). Anyone scraping the blockchain will just see signatures that look just like every other signature, and as long as nobody manages to hack you and get a copy of the adaptor signature or the private key, they cannot get the private key behind the public key (point) that the pointlocked branch needs (the prestige).
(Just to be clear, the public key you are getting the private key from, is distinct from the public key that the developemanufacturer will use for its funds. The activation key is different from the developer's onchain Bitcoin key, and it is the activation key whose private key you will be learning, not the developer's/manufacturer's onchain Bitcoin key).
So:
Taproot lets PTLCs exist onchain because they enable Schnorr, which is a requirement of PTLCs / Scriptless Script.
(technology-wise, take note that Scriptless Script works only for the "pointlocked" branch of the contract; you need normal Script, or a pre-signed nLockTimed transaction, for the "timelocked" branch. Since Taproot can embed a script, you can have the Taproot pubkey be a 2-of-2 to implement the Scriptless Script "pointlocked" branch, then have a hidden script that lets you recover the funds with an OP_CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY after the timeout if the seller does not claim the funds.)

Quantum Quibbles!

Now if you were really paying attention, you might have noticed this parenthetical:
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash...)
So wait, Taproot uses raw 32-byte public keys, and not public key hashes? Isn't that more quantum-vulnerable??
Well, in theory yes. In practice, they probably are not.
It's not that hashes can be broken by quantum computes --- they're still not. Instead, you have to look at how you spend from a P2WPKH/P2PKH pay-to-public-key-hash.
When you spend from a P2PKH / P2WPKH, you have to reveal the public key. Then Bitcoin hashes it and checks if this matches with the public-key-hash, and only then actually validates the signature for that public key.
So an unconfirmed transaction, floating in the mempools of nodes globally, will show, in plain sight for everyone to see, your public key.
(public keys should be public, that's why they're called public keys, LOL)
And if quantum computers are fast enough to be of concern, then they are probably fast enough that, in the several minutes to several hours from broadcast to confirmation, they have already cracked the public key that is openly broadcast with your transaction. The owner of the quantum computer can now replace your unconfirmed transaction with one that pays the funds to itself. Even if you did not opt-in RBF, miners are still incentivized to support RBF on RBF-disabled transactions.
So the extra hash is not as significant a protection against quantum computers as you might think. Instead, the extra hash-and-compare needed is just extra validation effort.
Further, if you have ever, in the past, spent from the address, then there exists already a transaction indelibly stored on the blockchain, openly displaying the public key from which quantum computers can derive the private key. So those are still vulnerable to quantum computers.
For the most part, the cryptographers behind Taproot (and Bitcoin Core) are of the opinion that quantum computers capable of cracking Bitcoin pubkeys are unlikely to appear within a decade or two.
So:
For now, the homomorphic and linear properties of elliptic curve cryptography provide a lot of benefits --- particularly the linearity property is what enables Scriptless Script and simple multisignature (i.e. multisignatures that are just 1 signature onchain). So it might be a good idea to take advantage of them now while we are still fairly safe against quantum computers. It seems likely that quantum-safe signature schemes are nonlinear (thus losing these advantages).

Summary

I Wanna Be The Taprooter!

So, do you want to help activate Taproot? Here's what you, mister sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, can do!

But I Hate Taproot!!

That's fine!

Discussions About Taproot Activation

submitted by almkglor to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[ Bitcoin ] Technical: Taproot: Why Activate?

Topic originally posted in Bitcoin by almkglor [link]
This is a follow-up on https://old.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/hqzp14/technical_the_path_to_taproot_activation/
Taproot! Everybody wants it!! But... you might ask yourself: sure, everybody else wants it, but why would I, sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, want it? Surely I can be better than everybody else because I swapped XXX fiat for Bitcoin unlike all those nocoiners?
And it is important for you to know the reasons why you, o sovereign Bitcoiner, would want Taproot activated. After all, your nodes (or the nodes your wallets use, which if you are SPV, you hopefully can pester to your wallet vendoimplementor about) need to be upgraded in order for Taproot activation to actually succeed instead of becoming a hot sticky mess.
First, let's consider some principles of Bitcoin.
I'm sure most of us here would agree that the above are very important principles of Bitcoin and that these are principles we would not be willing to remove. If anything, we would want those principles strengthened (especially the last one, financial privacy, which current Bitcoin is only sporadically strong with: you can get privacy, it just requires effort to do so).
So, how does Taproot affect those principles?

Taproot and Your /Coins

Most HODLers probably HODL their coins in singlesig addresses. Sadly, switching to Taproot would do very little for you (it gives a mild discount at spend time, at the cost of a mild increase in fee at receive time (paid by whoever sends to you, so if it's a self-send from a P2PKH or bech32 address, you pay for this); mostly a wash).
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash, so the Taproot output spends 12 bytes more; spending from a P2WPKH requires revealing a 32-byte public key later, which is not needed with Taproot, and Taproot signatures are about 9 bytes smaller than P2WPKH signatures, but the 32 bytes plus 9 bytes is divided by 4 because of the witness discount, so it saves about 11 bytes; mostly a wash, it increases blockweight by about 1 virtual byte, 4 weight for each Taproot-output-input, compared to P2WPKH-output-input).
However, as your HODLings grow in value, you might start wondering if multisignature k-of-n setups might be better for the security of your savings. And it is in multisignature that Taproot starts to give benefits!
Taproot switches to using Schnorr signing scheme. Schnorr makes key aggregation -- constructing a single public key from multiple public keys -- almost as trivial as adding numbers together. "Almost" because it involves some fairly advanced math instead of simple boring number adding, but hey when was the last time you added up your grocery list prices by hand huh?
With current P2SH and P2WSH multisignature schemes, if you have a 2-of-3 setup, then to spend, you need to provide two different signatures from two different public keys. With Taproot, you can create, using special moon math, a single public key that represents your 2-of-3 setup. Then you just put two of your devices together, have them communicate to each other (this can be done airgapped, in theory, by sending QR codes: the software to do this is not even being built yet, but that's because Taproot hasn't activated yet!), and they will make a single signature to authorize any spend from your 2-of-3 address. That's 73 witness bytes -- 18.25 virtual bytes -- of signatures you save!
And if you decide that your current setup with 1-of-1 P2PKH / P2WPKH addresses is just fine as-is: well, that's the whole point of a softfork: backwards-compatibility; you can receive from Taproot users just fine, and once your wallet is updated for Taproot-sending support, you can send to Taproot users just fine as well!
(P2WPKH and P2WSH -- SegWit v0 -- addresses start with bc1q; Taproot -- SegWit v1 --- addresses start with bc1p, in case you wanted to know the difference; in bech32 q is 0, p is 1)
Now how about HODLers who keep all, or some, of their coins on custodial services? Well, any custodial service worth its salt would be doing at least 2-of-3, or probably something even bigger, like 11-of-15. So your custodial service, if it switched to using Taproot internally, could save a lot more (imagine an 11-of-15 getting reduced from 11 signatures to just 1!), which --- we can only hope! --- should translate to lower fees and better customer service from your custodial service!
So I think we can say, very accurately, that the Bitcoin principle --- that YOU are in control of your money --- can only be helped by Taproot (if you are doing multisignature), and, because P2PKH and P2WPKH remain validly-usable addresses in a Taproot future, will not be harmed by Taproot. Its benefit to this principle might be small (it mostly only benefits multisignature users) but since it has no drawbacks with this (i.e. singlesig users can continue to use P2WPKH and P2PKH still) this is still a nice, tidy win!
(even singlesig users get a minor benefit, in that multisig users will now reduce their blockchain space footprint, so that fees can be kept low for everybody; so for example even if you have your single set of private keys engraved on titanium plates sealed in an airtight box stored in a safe buried in a desert protected by angry nomads riding giant sandworms because you're the frickin' Kwisatz Haderach, you still gain some benefit from Taproot)
And here's the important part: if P2PKH/P2WPKH is working perfectly fine with you and you decide to never use Taproot yourself, Taproot will not affect you detrimentally. First do no harm!

Taproot and Your Contracts

No one is an island, no one lives alone. Give and you shall receive. You know: by trading with other people, you can gain expertise in some obscure little necessity of the world (and greatly increase your productivity in that little field), and then trade the products of your expertise for necessities other people have created, all of you thereby gaining gains from trade.
So, contracts, which are basically enforceable agreements that facilitate trading with people who you do not personally know and therefore might not trust.
Let's start with a simple example. You want to buy some gewgaws from somebody. But you don't know them personally. The seller wants the money, you want their gewgaws, but because of the lack of trust (you don't know them!! what if they're scammers??) neither of you can benefit from gains from trade.
However, suppose both of you know of some entity that both of you trust. That entity can act as a trusted escrow. The entity provides you security: this enables the trade, allowing both of you to get gains from trade.
In Bitcoin-land, this can be implemented as a 2-of-3 multisignature. The three signatories in the multisgnature would be you, the gewgaw seller, and the escrow. You put the payment for the gewgaws into this 2-of-3 multisignature address.
Now, suppose it turns out neither of you are scammers (whaaaat!). You receive the gewgaws just fine and you're willing to pay up for them. Then you and the gewgaw seller just sign a transaction --- you and the gewgaw seller are 2, sufficient to trigger the 2-of-3 --- that spends from the 2-of-3 address to a singlesig the gewgaw seller wants (or whatever address the gewgaw seller wants).
But suppose some problem arises. The seller gave you gawgews instead of gewgaws. Or you decided to keep the gewgaws but not sign the transaction to release the funds to the seller. In either case, the escrow is notified, and if it can sign with you to refund the funds back to you (if the seller was a scammer) or it can sign with the seller to forward the funds to the seller (if you were a scammer).
Taproot helps with this: like mentioned above, it allows multisignature setups to produce only one signature, reducing blockchain space usage, and thus making contracts --- which require multiple people, by definition, you don't make contracts with yourself --- is made cheaper (which we hope enables more of these setups to happen for more gains from trade for everyone, also, moon and lambos).
(technology-wise, it's easier to make an n-of-n than a k-of-n, making a k-of-n would require a complex setup involving a long ritual with many communication rounds between the n participants, but an n-of-n can be done trivially with some moon math. You can, however, make what is effectively a 2-of-3 by using a three-branch SCRIPT: either 2-of-2 of you and seller, OR 2-of-2 of you and escrow, OR 2-of-2 of escrow and seller. Fortunately, Taproot adds a facility to embed a SCRIPT inside a public key, so you can have a 2-of-2 Taprooted address (between you and seller) with a SCRIPT branch that can instead be spent with 2-of-2 (you + escrow) OR 2-of-2 (seller + escrow), which implements the three-branched SCRIPT above. If neither of you are scammers (hopefully the common case) then you both sign using your keys and never have to contact the escrow, since you are just using the escrow public key without coordinating with them (because n-of-n is trivial but k-of-n requires setup with communication rounds), so in the "best case" where both of you are honest traders, you also get a privacy boost, in that the escrow never learns you have been trading on gewgaws, I mean ewww, gawgews are much better than gewgaws and therefore I now judge you for being a gewgaw enthusiast, you filthy gewgawer).

Taproot and Your Contracts, Part 2: Cryptographic Boogaloo

Now suppose you want to buy some data instead of things. For example, maybe you have some closed-source software in trial mode installed, and want to pay the developer for the full version. You want to pay for an activation code.
This can be done, today, by using an HTLC. The developer tells you the hash of the activation code. You pay to an HTLC, paying out to the developer if it reveals the preimage (the activation code), or refunding the money back to you after a pre-agreed timeout. If the developer claims the funds, it has to reveal the preimage, which is the activation code, and you can now activate your software. If the developer does not claim the funds by the timeout, you get refunded.
And you can do that, with HTLCs, today.
Of course, HTLCs do have problems:
Fortunately, with Schnorr (which is enabled by Taproot), we can now use the Scriptless Script constuction by Andrew Poelstra. This Scriptless Script allows a new construction, the PTLC or Pointlocked Timelocked Contract. Instead of hashes and preimages, just replace "hash" with "point" and "preimage" with "scalar".
Or as you might know them: "point" is really "public key" and "scalar" is really a "private key". What a PTLC does is that, given a particular public key, the pointlocked branch can be spent only if the spender reveals the private key of the given private key to you.
Another nice thing with PTLCs is that they are deniable. What appears onchain is just a single 2-of-2 signature between you and the developemanufacturer. It's like a magic trick. This signature has no special watermarks, it's a perfectly normal signature (the pledge). However, from this signature, plus some datta given to you by the developemanufacturer (known as the adaptor signature) you can derive the private key of a particular public key you both agree on (the turn). Anyone scraping the blockchain will just see signatures that look just like every other signature, and as long as nobody manages to hack you and get a copy of the adaptor signature or the private key, they cannot get the private key behind the public key (point) that the pointlocked branch needs (the prestige).
(Just to be clear, the public key you are getting the private key from, is distinct from the public key that the developemanufacturer will use for its funds. The activation key is different from the developer's onchain Bitcoin key, and it is the activation key whose private key you will be learning, not the developer's/manufacturer's onchain Bitcoin key).
So:
Taproot lets PTLCs exist onchain because they enable Schnorr, which is a requirement of PTLCs / Scriptless Script.
(technology-wise, take note that Scriptless Script works only for the "pointlocked" branch of the contract; you need normal Script, or a pre-signed nLockTimed transaction, for the "timelocked" branch. Since Taproot can embed a script, you can have the Taproot pubkey be a 2-of-2 to implement the Scriptless Script "pointlocked" branch, then have a hidden script that lets you recover the funds with an OP_CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY after the timeout if the seller does not claim the funds.)

Quantum Quibbles!

Now if you were really paying attention, you might have noticed this parenthetical:
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash...)
So wait, Taproot uses raw 32-byte public keys, and not public key hashes? Isn't that more quantum-vulnerable??
Well, in theory yes. In practice, they probably are not.
It's not that hashes can be broken by quantum computes --- they're still not. Instead, you have to look at how you spend from a P2WPKH/P2PKH pay-to-public-key-hash.
When you spend from a P2PKH / P2WPKH, you have to reveal the public key. Then Bitcoin hashes it and checks if this matches with the public-key-hash, and only then actually validates the signature for that public key.
So an unconfirmed transaction, floating in the mempools of nodes globally, will show, in plain sight for everyone to see, your public key.
(public keys should be public, that's why they're called public keys, LOL)
And if quantum computers are fast enough to be of concern, then they are probably fast enough that, in the several minutes to several hours from broadcast to confirmation, they have already cracked the public key that is openly broadcast with your transaction. The owner of the quantum computer can now replace your unconfirmed transaction with one that pays the funds to itself. Even if you did not opt-in RBF, miners are still incentivized to support RBF on RBF-disabled transactions.
So the extra hash is not as significant a protection against quantum computers as you might think. Instead, the extra hash-and-compare needed is just extra validation effort.
Further, if you have ever, in the past, spent from the address, then there exists already a transaction indelibly stored on the blockchain, openly displaying the public key from which quantum computers can derive the private key. So those are still vulnerable to quantum computers.
For the most part, the cryptographers behind Taproot (and Bitcoin Core) are of the opinion that quantum computers capable of cracking Bitcoin pubkeys are unlikely to appear within a decade or two.
So:
For now, the homomorphic and linear properties of elliptic curve cryptography provide a lot of benefits --- particularly the linearity property is what enables Scriptless Script and simple multisignature (i.e. multisignatures that are just 1 signature onchain). So it might be a good idea to take advantage of them now while we are still fairly safe against quantum computers. It seems likely that quantum-safe signature schemes are nonlinear (thus losing these advantages).

Summary

I Wanna Be The Taprooter!

So, do you want to help activate Taproot? Here's what you, mister sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, can do!

But I Hate Taproot!!

That's fine!

Discussions About Taproot Activation

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What is Blockchain Technology?

What is Blockchain Technology?
The original article appeared here: https://www.securities.io/what-is-blockchain-technology/
Its been almost ten years since Satoshi Nakamoto first introduced Blockchain technology to the world in his 2008 Bitcoin Whitepaper. Since that time, these revolutionary networks have gained popularity in both the corporate and governmental sectors. This growth is easily explained when you consider that blockchain technology provides the world with some unique advantages that were previously unimaginable. Consequently, today, you can find blockchain technology in nearly every sector of the global economy.

What is Blockchain Technology?

A blockchain is a network of computers that share a distributed ledger across all network participants (nodes). This strategy is far different than say, fiat currencies that originate from a centralized authority figure. Importantly, this ledger keeps an unbroken chain of transactions since the birth of the network. This “chain” of transactions grows larger as new “blocks” of transactions are approved and added to it.
Bitcoin Whitepaper
In order to approve new transactions, each node works together with others to validate new blocks. Additionally, the nodes also validate the current state of the entire blockchain. In order for a new block of transactions to be added to the blockchain, they must receive approval from 51% of the network’s nodes. Nodes are also referred to as miners. In this manner, blockchain networks are decentralized networks that provide unmatched security to the world of digital assets.

Security via Decentralization

Decentralization is an important aspect of blockchain technology because it makes these revolutionary ledgers immutable and unalterable. In fact, since there is no centralized attack vector, hacking a blockchain is nearly impossible. The larger the blockchain network, the more secure the data on it remains.
For example, let’s look at the world’s largest blockchain, Bitcoin. Currently, the Bitcoin blockchain has over 10,000 active nodes located across the globe. This distribution means that in order for an attacker to alter even just one tiny piece of information on the blockchain, they would need to successfully hack 5,000+ computers at once.
While this task may not be impossible for the quantum computers of the future, it’s so unprofitable that it makes no sense to even attempt such a monumental task. Additionally, on top of successfully hacking 5000+ computers at once, an attacker would also need a supercomputer to recalculate the new blockchain transactions in time to introduce them into the network. It would literally be more affordable to create a new cryptocurrency from scratch.

Consensus Mechanisms

One of the reasons why blockchain networks are so secure is the integration of consensus mechanisms. Consensus mechanisms are cryptographic protocols that leverage the participants of a blockchain network in securing its data. In the case of Bitcoin, the Proof-of-Work (PoW) consensus mechanism is used.

Proof-of-Work (PoW)

The Proof-of-Work consensus mechanism was revolutionary to the world of cryptography when it was first introduced years prior by Adam Back in his Hashcash whitepaper. In the concept, Back describes the integration of a mathematical equation to the network’s security protocols. In this way, every computer can show “proof” of their work securing the network.

Miner Rewards

It’s important to understand that nodes receive a reward for their mining efforts. These rewards adjust automatically depending on the network’s difficulty and value. In the case of Bitcoin, miners originally received 50 Bitcoin for their efforts. Today, this seems like fortune, but back in 2009, Bitcoin was only worth pennies. As the value of the token rises and the network goes, the mining rewards shrink. Today, Bitcoin miners receive 6.5 BTC if they add the next block to the chain.

SHA-256

Notably, every node validates and secures the blockchain, but only one gets to add the next block of transactions to the network. To determine who the next miner is that gets to add this block, every computer competes in a mathematical race to figure out the PoW equation. In the case of Bitcoin, the equation is known as SHA-256. Importantly, the first SHA algorithm dates back to Hashcash. This early version of the equation was known as SHA-1.
Notably, the SHA-256 equation is so difficult that it’s easier and more efficient for your computer to just make random guesses rather than attempting to figure out the equation directly. The answer to the equation must begin with a predetermined amount of 0s. In the Bitcoin blockchain, the equation’s answer must start with four zeros. However, if the network’s congestion rises, so does the difficulty of these equations. This difficulty adjusts by the addition of another zero at the beginning of the required SHA-256 answer.
Similarly to traditional commodities such as gold, there are costs that are associated with the creation and introduction of these digital assets into the market. These random guesses utilize intense computational power. This power equates to real-world costs such as electricity bills. Studies have shown that securing the Bitcoin network can use more electricity than required by entire countries. Luckily, over 80% of Bitcoin’s power consumption comes from renewable sources such as solar or hydroelectric. This cost of mining also adds measurable value to each Bitcoin.

Miners

As Bitcoin began to gain in profitability, its network’s computing power expanded significantly. In the beginning, nodes, also known as miners, could mine for Bitcoin using nothing more than your home PC. Eventually, miners realized that graphic cards were far better at the repetitive guessing required to figure out the SHA-256 algorithm. This led to a computational race in the market.

ASIC

Eventually, large blockchain firms such as Bitmain introduced Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) miners into the equation. These purpose-built miners were thousands of times more efficient at guessing the SHA-256 algorithm than the GPUs and CPUs before them. Consequently, their introduction created a scenario in which the average miner now needed to invest thousands in mining equipment to stay relevant.

Mining Pools

Luckily, some creative minds in the field began to think of ways to level the playing field out again. They developed “mining pools.” A mining pool is a network of miners that all share computational power for the common goal of mining blockchain transactions. Importantly, mining pool participants receive a percentage of the reward based on their contributions to the network’s overall hash (computational power).
Importantly, over the last three years, there has been a push to move away from power-hungry consensus mechanisms such as PoW. This desire to secure blockchains in a more efficient manner has led to the development of some truly unique consensus mechanisms in the sector.

Proof-of-Stake (PoS)

The Proof-of-Stake mechanism does away with the difficult mathematical algorithms and instead utilizes a more psychological approach to securing the network. In a PoS blockchain, users don’t need to compete mathematically to add the next block to the blockchain. Instead, PoS users “stake” their coins via network wallets to secure the network. The way staking works is simple.
Keeping a certain amount of coins in your wallet allows you to participate in transaction validations. The more coins you stake, the more likely the chances are you get to add the next block of transactions to the network. In most PoS systems, a miner from those with the most tokens staked at the time receives the chance to add the blocks.
The advantages of a PoS consensus mechanism are immediately evident. For one, you don’t need to pour tons of resources into your network to keep it safe. Additionally, since nodes are chosen based on their amount of staked coins, there is never a scenario in which a node gains anything from validating incorrect transactions. Basically, a hacker would have to fully invest in the cryptocurrency prior to attacking the network. In this way, PoS systems create a huge deterrent to attackers.

The Future of Blockchain Technology

Blockchain technology has come a long way from its early days as a means to secure cryptocurrency networks. Today, blockchain technology has numerous uses across every type of industry imaginable. Specifically, blockchain programs have impacted the logistical, financial, and data security sectors in a major way.

Blockchain Technology Logistics

Blockchain logistical systems are more efficient and cost-effective to operate than traditional paper-based models. In fact, the immutable and unalterable nature of blockchain tech makes it ideally suited to logistical tasks. Soon, you may be able to ascertain much more information regarding the creation and delivery of your products thanks to these new-age systems emerging.

Fundraising

Blockchain technology has also altered the way in which businesses raise funds. In a traditional corporate crowdfunding strategy such as an IPO, companies must balance between cost-effectiveness and participation. The inability to process smaller transactions meant that for the longest time, companies had to turn away potential investors. Nowadays, blockchain technology enables businesses to easily automate these procedures via smart contracts.

Smart Contracts

Smart Contracts feature preprogrammed protocols that execute when they receive a certain amount of cryptocurrency sent to their address. These contracts live on the blockchain and enable remarkable functionality. For example, in the case of fundraising, a smart contract can automate processes such as the approval of investors and the distribution of funds.

Blockchain Technology Today

You can expect to see further expansion of the blockchain sector in the coming months as more governments and institutions explore its benefits. For now, the blockchain revolution is well underway.
submitted by BlockDotCo to u/BlockDotCo [link] [comments]

Introduction Thread + Plans for the future!

Hey everyone! Welcome to the ABCmint (Or ABC, or Abcardo) subreddit! Please feel free to introduce yourselves below. I wrote a few questions to get the creative juices flowing.
Quick intro here: I'm u/seekingomega, and I've been mining ABCmint for roughly 2 years now (give or take).
On my ABC journey, I've made a few YouTube videos about the project, created a (pretty crappy) block explorer, and have had the pleasure of meeting others who have an interest in PQC blockchains as well.
To answer my own questions...
Plans for the future: I'll start scouring the web for ABC related news that pops up, and share them on this subreddit.
Additionally, I'd like to add some good PQC readings. If you have articles or books, please share them in a comment!
submitted by seekingomega to ABCMint [link] [comments]

Threshold Signature Explained— Bringing Exciting Applications with TSS

Threshold Signature Explained— Bringing Exciting Applications with TSS
— A deep dive into threshold signature without mathematics by ARPA’s cryptographer Dr. Alex Su

https://preview.redd.it/cp0wib2mk0q41.png?width=757&format=png&auto=webp&s=d42056f42fb16041bc512f10f10fed56a16dc279
Threshold signature is a distributed multi-party signature protocol that includes distributed key generation, signature, and verification algorithms.
In recent years, with the rapid development of blockchain technology, signature algorithms have gained widespread attention in both academic research and real-world applications. Its properties like security, practicability, scalability, and decentralization of signature are pored through.
Due to the fact that blockchain and signature are closely connected, the development of signature algorithms and the introduction of new signature paradigms will directly affect the characteristics and efficiency of blockchain networks.
In addition, institutional and personal account key management requirements stimulated by distributed ledgers have also spawned many wallet applications, and this change has also affected traditional enterprises. No matter in the blockchain or traditional financial institutions, the threshold signature scheme can bring security and privacy improvement in various scenarios. As an emerging technology, threshold signatures are still under academic research and discussions, among which there are unverified security risks and practical problems.
This article will start from the technical rationale and discuss about cryptography and blockchain. Then we will compare multi-party computation and threshold signature before discussing the pros and cons of different paradigms of signature. In the end, there will be a list of use cases of threshold signature. So that, the reader may quickly learn about the threshold signature.
I. Cryptography in Daily Life
Before introducing threshold signatures, let’s get a general understanding of cryptography. How does cryptography protect digital information? How to create an identity in the digital world? At the very beginning, people want secure storage and transmission. After one creates a key, he can use symmetric encryption to store secrets. If two people have the same key, they can achieve secure transmission between them. Like, the king encrypts a command and the general decrypts it with the corresponding key.
But when two people do not have a safe channel to use, how can they create a shared key? So, the key exchange protocol came into being. Analogously, if the king issues an order to all the people in the digital world, how can everyone proves that the sentence originated from the king? As such, the digital signature protocol was invented. Both protocols are based on public key cryptography, or asymmetric cryptographic algorithms.


“Tiger Rune” is a troop deployment tool used by ancient emperor’s, made of bronze or gold tokens in the shape of a tiger, split in half, half of which is given to the general and the other half is saved by the emperor. Only when two tiger amulets are combined and used at the same time, will the amulet holder get the right to dispatch troops.
Symmetric and asymmetric encryption constitute the main components of modern cryptography. They both have three fixed parts: key generation, encryption, and decryption. Here, we focus on digital signature protocols. The key generation process generates a pair of associated keys: the public key and the private key. The public key is open to everyone, and the private key represents the identity and is only revealed to the owner. Whoever owns the private key has the identity represented by the key. The encryption algorithm, or signature algorithm, takes the private key as input and generate a signature on a piece of information. The decryption algorithm, or signature verification algorithm, uses public keys to verify the validity of the signature and the correctness of the information.
II. Signature in the Blockchain
Looking back on blockchain, it uses consensus algorithm to construct distributed books, and signature provides identity information for blockchain. All the transaction information on the blockchain is identified by the signature of the transaction initiator. The blockchain can verify the signature according to specific rules to check the transaction validity, all thanks to the immutability and verifiability of the signature.
For cryptography, the blockchain is more than using signature protocol, or that the consensus algorithm based on Proof-of-Work uses a hash function. Blockchain builds an infrastructure layer of consensus and transaction through. On top of that, the novel cryptographic protocols such as secure multi-party computation, zero-knowledge proof, homomorphic encryption thrives. For example, secure multi-party computation, which is naturally adapted to distributed networks, can build secure data transfer and machine learning platforms on the blockchain. The special nature of zero-knowledge proof provides feasibility for verifiable anonymous transactions. The combination of these cutting-edge cryptographic protocols and blockchain technology will drive the development of the digital world in the next decade, leading to secure data sharing, privacy protection, or more applications now unimaginable.
III. Secure Multi-party Computation and Threshold Signature
After introducing how digital signature protocol affects our lives, and how to help the blockchain build identities and record transactions, we will mention secure multi-party computation (MPC), from where we can see how threshold signatures achieve decentralization. For more about MPC, please refer to our previous posts which detailed the technical background and application scenarios.
MPC, by definition, is a secure computation that several participants jointly execute. Security here means that, in one computation, all participants provide their own private input, and can obtain results from the calculation. It is not possible to get any private information entered by other parties. In 1982, when Prof. Yao proposed the concept of MPC, he gave an example called the “Millionaires Problem” — two millionaires who want to know who is richer than the other without telling the true amount of assets. Specifically, the secure multiparty computation would care about the following properties:
  • Privacy: Any participant cannot obtain any private input of other participants, except for information that can be inferred from the computation results.
  • Correctness and verifiability: The computation should ensure correct execution, and the legitimacy and correctness of this process should be verifiable by participants or third parties.
  • Fairness or robustness: All parties involved in the calculation, if not agreed in advance, should be able to obtain the computation results at the same time or cannot obtain the results.
Supposing we use secure multi-party computation to make a digital signature in a general sense, we will proceed as follows:
  • Key generation phase: all future participants will be involved together to do two things: 1) each involved party generates a secret private key; 2) The public key is calculated according to the sequence of private keys.
  • Signature phase: Participants joining in a certain signature use their own private keys as private inputs, and the information to be signed as a public input to perform a joint signature operation to obtain a signature. In this process, the privacy of secure multi-party computing ensures the security of private keys. The correctness and robustness guarantee the unforgeability of the signature and everyone can all get signatures.
  • Verification phase: Use the public key corresponding to the transaction to verify the signature as traditional algorithm. There is no “secret input” during the verification, this means that the verification can be performed without multi-party computation, which will become an advantage of multi-party computation type distributed signature.
The signature protocol constructed on the idea of ​​secure multiparty computing is the threshold signature. It should be noted that we have omitted some details, because secure multiparty computing is actually a collective name for a type of cryptographic protocol. For different security assumptions and threshold settings, there are different construction methods. Therefore, the threshold signatures of different settings will also have distinctive properties, this article will not explain each setting, but the comparative result with other signature schemes will be introduced in the next section.
IV. Single Signature, Multi-Signature and Threshold Signature
Besides the threshold signature, what other methods can we choose?
Bitcoin at the beginning, uses single signature which allocates each account with one private key. The message signed by this key is considered legitimate. Later, in order to avoid single point of failure, or introduce account management by multiple people, Bitcoin provides a multi-signature function. Multi-signature can be simply understood as each account owner signs successively and post all signatures to the chain. Then signatures are verified in order on the chain. When certain conditions are met, the transaction is legitimate. This method achieves a multiple private keys control purpose.
So, what’s the difference between multi-signature and threshold signature?
Several constraints of multi-signature are:
  1. The access structure is not flexible. If an account’s access structure is given, that is, which private keys can complete a legal signature, this structure cannot be adjusted at a later stage. For example, a participant withdraws, or a new involved party needs to change the access structure. If you must change, you need to complete the initial setup process again, which will change the public key and account address as well.
  2. Less efficiency. The first is that the verification on chain consumes power of all nodes, and therefore requires a processing fee. The verification of multiple signatures is equivalent to multiple single signatures. The second is performance. The verification obviously takes more time.
  3. Requirements of smart contract support and algorithm adaptation that varies from chain to chain. Because multi-sig is not naturally supported. Due to the possible vulnerabilities in smart contracts, this support is considered risky.
  4. No anonymity, this is not able to be trivially called disadvantage or advantage, because anonymity is required for specific conditions. Anonymity here means that multi-signature directly exposes all participating signers of the transaction.
Correspondingly, the threshold signature has the following features:
  1. The access structure is flexible. Through an additional multi-party computation, the existing private key sequence can be expanded to assign private keys to new participants. This process will not expose the old and newly generated private key, nor will it change the public key and account address.
  2. It provides more efficiency. For the chain, the signature generated by the threshold signature is not different from a single signature, which means the following improvements : a) The verification is the same as the single signature, and needs no additional fee; b ) the information of the signer is invisible, because for other nodes, the information is decrypted with the same public key; c) No smart contract on chain is needed to provide additional support.
In addition to the above discussion, there is a distributed signature scheme supported by Shamir secret sharing. Secret sharing algorithm has a long history which is used to slice information storage and perform error correction information. From the underlying algorithm of secure computation to the error correction of the disc. This technology has always played an important role, but the main problem is that when used in a signature protocol, Shamir secret sharing needs to recover the master private key.
As for multiple signatures or threshold signature, the master private key has never been reconstructed, even if it is in memory or cache. this short-term reconstruction is not tolerable for vital accounts.
V. Limitations
Just like other secure multi-party computation protocols, the introduction of other participants makes security model different with traditional point-to-point encrypted transmission. The problem of conspiracy and malicious participants were not taken into account in algorithms before. The behavior of physical entities cannot be restricted, and perpetrators are introduced into participating groups.
Therefore, multi-party cryptographic protocols cannot obtain the security strength as before. Effort is needed to develop threshold signature applications, integrate existing infrastructure, and test the true strength of threshold signature scheme.
VI. Scenarios
1. Key Management
The use of threshold signature in key management system can achieve a more flexible administration, such as ARPA’s enterprise key management API. One can use the access structure to design authorization pattern for users with different priorities. In addition, for the entry of new entities, the threshold signature can quickly refresh the key. This operation can also be performed periodically to level up the difficulty of hacking multiple private keys at the same time. Finally, for the verifier, the threshold signature is not different from the traditional signature, so it is compatible with old equipments and reduces the update cost. ARPA enterprise key management modules already support Elliptic Curve Digital Signature Scheme secp256k1 and ed25519 parameters. In the future, it will be compatible with more parameters.

https://preview.redd.it/c27zuuhdl0q41.png?width=757&format=png&auto=webp&s=26d46e871dadbbd4e3bea74d840e0198dec8eb1c
2. Crypto Wallet
Wallets based on threshold signature are more secure because the private key doesn’t need to be rebuilt. Also, without all signatures posted publicly, anonymity can be achieved. Compared to the multi-signature, threshold signature needs less transaction fees. Similar to key management applications, the administration of digital asset accounts can also be more flexible. Furthermore, threshold signature wallet can support various blockchains that do not natively support multi-signature, which reduces the risk of smart contracts bugs.

Conclusion

This article describes why people need the threshold signature, and what inspiring properties it may bring. One can see that threshold signature has higher security, more flexible control, more efficient verification process. In fact, different signature technologies have different application scenarios, such as aggregate signatures not mentioned in the article, and BLS-based multi-signature. At the same time, readers are also welcomed to read more about secure multi-party computation. Secure computation is the holy grail of cryptographic protocols. It can accomplish much more than the application of threshold signatures. In the near future, secure computation will solve more specific application questions in the digital world.

About Author

Dr. Alex Su works for ARPA as the cryptography researcher. He got his Bachelor’s degree in Electronic Engineering and Ph.D. in Cryptography from Tsinghua University. Dr. Su’s research interests include multi-party computation and post-quantum cryptography implementation and acceleration.

About ARPA

ARPA is committed to providing secure data transfer solutions based on cryptographic operations for businesses and individuals.
The ARPA secure multi-party computing network can be used as a protocol layer to implement privacy computing capabilities for public chains, and it enables developers to build efficient, secure, and data-protected business applications on private smart contracts. Enterprise and personal data can, therefore, be analyzed securely on the ARPA computing network without fear of exposing the data to any third party.
ARPA’s multi-party computing technology supports secure data markets, precision marketing, credit score calculations, and even the safe realization of personal data.
ARPA’s core team is international, with PhDs in cryptography from Tsinghua University, experienced systems engineers from Google, Uber, Amazon, Huawei and Mitsubishi, blockchain experts from the University of Tokyo, AIG, and the World Bank. We also have hired data scientists from CircleUp, as well as financial and data professionals from Fosun and Fidelity Investments.
For more information about ARPA, or to join our team, please contact us at [email protected].
Learn about ARPA’s recent official news:
Telegram (English): https://t.me/arpa_community
Telegram (Việt Nam): https://t.me/ARPAVietnam
Telegram (Russian): https://t.me/arpa_community_ru
Telegram (Indonesian): https://t.me/Arpa_Indonesia
Telegram (Thai): https://t.me/Arpa_Thai
Telegram (Philippines):https://t.me/ARPA_Philippines
Telegram (Turkish): https://t.me/Arpa_Turkey
Korean Chats: https://open.kakao.com/o/giExbhmb (Kakao) & https://t.me/arpakoreanofficial (Telegram, new)
Medium: https://medium.com/@arpa
Twitter: u/arpaofficial
Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/arpachain/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ARPA-317434982266680/54
submitted by arpaofficial to u/arpaofficial [link] [comments]

How exactly is Neo quantum computer proof?

I know the whitepaper claims Neo will be able to withstand quantum computational attacks, but I don't see how any blockchain would be able to prevent a quantum computer from deciphering peoples' private keys through fast paced trial and error.
Any insight on this would be much appreciated as I believe it is an important yet rarely discussed factor of Neo's brilliance.
submitted by rederr0r3 to NEO [link] [comments]

Erik Voorhees on Twitter: Can we take a moment to reflect on the fact that the Bitcoin protocol STILL hasn't been hacked? One of the greatest comp sci accomplishments

Erik Voorhees on Twitter: Can we take a moment to reflect on the fact that the Bitcoin protocol STILL hasn't been hacked? One of the greatest comp sci accomplishments submitted by dvno1 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Which cryptocurrencies have the potential for quantum resistance?

The title. I've read about quantum resistant cryptocurrencies like QRL, IOTA and NEO(?), but what about other cryptocurrencies? Do public blockchain cryptos like BTC, ETH, etc. have the potential for being updated into being quantum resistant. What about cryptos like XRP and XLM? How difficult is this to achieve in practice?
submitted by ParanoidPurchaser to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: CryptoTechnology top posts from 2017-12-23 to 2020-01-20 15:51 PDT

Period: 758.36 days
Submissions Comments
Total 956 13660
Rate (per day) 1.26 18.01
Unique Redditors 584 3144
Combined Score 21553 44566

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 1166 points, 43 submissions: Neophyte-
    1. "Do you need a Blockchain?" - this paper is fantastic, everyone should read this before evaluating a coin and if requires a block chain to solve a solution the coin is promising to solve. (136 points, 41 comments)
    2. Do any of you foresee a crypto being widely adopted as a general purpose payment coin? nano, btc, btccash etc (take your pick). I think it won't happen for reasons in this post. What do you think? (59 points, 54 comments)
    3. Noticed the huge rise of EOS lately what does it have over NEO and ethereum and to a lesser extent Cardano? I tried researching it, but wasn't sold. (54 points, 55 comments)
    4. Hard Problems in Cryptocurrency: Five Years Later ~Vitalik (46 points, 1 comment)
    5. I had a Q&A with Bruno head architect / CEO of oyster, thought you guys might like it. (45 points, 2 comments)
    6. A good article that explains in simple terms how Eth2 works, how it will be rolled out and migrated from eth1 (42 points, 4 comments)
    7. DAI the stablecoin can now be transferred GAS free (article explaining how it works via new MCD DAI contract). This holds alot of promise for the so called "Web3" (40 points, 8 comments)
    8. Veriblock is consuming 27% of bitcoins block space - what does this mean for bitcoins future? (39 points, 16 comments)
    9. Vitalik: Alternative proposal for early eth1 <-> eth2 merge (38 points, 3 comments)
    10. Is launching a PoW permissionless blockchain still possible today? or would it be too susceptible to a 51% attack? (37 points, 37 comments)
  2. 578 points, 16 submissions: crypto_ha
    1. Why is Ripple considered a cryptocurrency (by many)? (109 points, 63 comments)
    2. So reportedly there are serious vulnerabilities found in EOS’ code. And it seems like those are more than just random software bugs. (97 points, 29 comments)
    3. Guide: How to get started with Blockchain development? (60 points, 6 comments)
    4. A newly found vulnerability in Nano's Android wallet (44 points, 12 comments)
    5. The history and state of Ethereum's Casper research - Vitalik Buterin (39 points, 4 comments)
    6. What is the difference between Sidechain vs Child Chain vs Off Chain? (39 points, 12 comments)
    7. EOS mainnet is official live (finally), but... (36 points, 24 comments)
    8. Bitcoin's "doomsday" economics - Bank of International Settlements (34 points, 23 comments)
    9. How Wall Street’s embrace could undermine Bitcoin (30 points, 9 comments)
    10. Ethereum ERC 1497: DApp Dispute Evidence Standard (24 points, 0 comments)
  3. 513 points, 20 submissions: ndha1995
    1. Ethereum Classic is currently being 51% attacked (103 points, 31 comments)
    2. Why are there so many garbage posts the past 24 hours? (58 points, 10 comments)
    3. Google Unveils 72-Qubit Quantum Processor With Low Error Rates (48 points, 24 comments)
    4. IOTA's Network-Bound PoW consensus, is it feasible? (42 points, 13 comments)
    5. The Challenges of Investigating Cryptocurrencies and Blockchain Related Crime (29 points, 7 comments)
    6. Deep dive into zk-STARKs with Vitalik Buterin's blog posts (26 points, 3 comments)
    7. Tether discussion thread (26 points, 21 comments)
    8. Vitalik Buterin Proposes a Consensus Algorithm That Requires Only 1% to Be Honest (24 points, 8 comments)
    9. Can somebody compare Qtum vs. NEO, technology-wise? (E.g. PoS vs. PoW; smart contract protocols...) (21 points, 15 comments)
    10. Introduction to Non Fungible Tokens (NFTs) (21 points, 9 comments)
  4. 377 points, 16 submissions: turtleflax
    1. Around 13% of DASH's privateSends are traceable to their origin (69 points, 3 comments)
    2. "Big Bang" attack could leverage Monero's dynamic blocksize to bloat the blockchain to 30TB in only 36 hours (52 points, 3 comments)
    3. The case for the obsolescence of Proof of Work and why 2018 will be the year of Proof of Stake (41 points, 29 comments)
    4. Monero vs PIVX: The First Scheduled Privacy Coin Debate Thread on /CryptoCurrency (38 points, 12 comments)
    5. Introducing the Privacy Coin Matrix, a cross-team collaboration comparing 20 privacy coins in 100 categories (26 points, 25 comments)
    6. Do permissioned blockchains have any merits? (25 points, 23 comments)
    7. The State of Hashing Algorithms — The Why, The How, and The Future (21 points, 4 comments)
    8. How Zerocoin Works in 5 Minutes (19 points, 5 comments)
    9. Errors made by Satoshi (17 points, 8 comments)
    10. How Much Privacy is Enough? Threats, Scaling, and Trade-offs in Blockchain Privacy Protocols - Ian Miers (Cornell Tech, Zerocoin, Zerocash) (17 points, 4 comments)
  5. 321 points, 6 submissions: Qwahzi
    1. Technical comparison of LIGHTNING vs TANGLE vs HASHGRAPH vs NANO (133 points, 37 comments)
    2. Addressing Nano's weaknesses (bandwidth usage and disk IO). Nano voting traffic to be reduced by 99.9% by implementing vote by hash, lazy bootstrapping, and reduced vote rebroadcasting (x-post CryptoCurrency) (78 points, 8 comments)
    3. Emergent centralization due to economies of scale (PoW vs DPoS) – Colin LeMahieu (52 points, 37 comments)
    4. Nano community member developing a distributed "mining" service to pay people to do PoW for third-parties (e.g. exchanges, light wallet services, etc) (32 points, 20 comments)
    5. What do you think about OpenCAP, the cryptocurrency alias protocol that mirrors traditional email addresses? (15 points, 12 comments)
    6. Bitcoin would be a calamity, not an economy (11 points, 52 comments)
  6. 256 points, 4 submissions: rockyrainy
    1. Bitcoin Gold hit by Double Spend Attack (51% attack). The Attacker reversed 22 blocks. (179 points, 102 comments)
    2. ZK-starks white paper published (44 points, 16 comments)
    3. [Q] How does a network reach consensus on what time it is? (21 points, 17 comments)
    4. Stateless (no history) Cryptocurrency via snapshots? (12 points, 7 comments)
  7. 244 points, 3 submissions: HSPremier
    1. From a technical standpoint: Why does every blockchain projects need their own coins? (181 points, 50 comments)
    2. What is Reddit's obsession with REQ? (61 points, 43 comments)
    3. What is the technological difference between a privacy coin and a privacy coin platform? Won't a privacy coin platform be more superior than a privacy coin? (2 points, 3 comments)
  8. 234 points, 2 submissions: Realness100
    1. A Guided Reading of Bitcoin’s Original White Paper (202 points, 10 comments)
    2. A Guided Reading of Ethereum's Original White Paper! (32 points, 5 comments)
  9. 185 points, 4 submissions: tracyspacygo
    1. My brief observation of most common Consensus Algorithms (159 points, 49 comments)
    2. What are the main Trends/Challenges for Bitcoin and whole crytpocurrencies industry? (12 points, 33 comments)
    3. Guideline for Newbies: Trying out Bitcoin transactions with TESTNET (7 points, 1 comment)
    4. Most advanced Cryptocurrencies Comparison Table (7 points, 8 comments)
  10. 177 points, 9 submissions: benmdi
    1. What's the best argument against cryptotechnology? I.e. Steelman the cryptocurrency skeptic (43 points, 42 comments)
    2. Would there be interest from this community in crypto resources aimed at developers? If so, what topics? (29 points, 14 comments)
    3. Has the window for bootstrapping a new PoW coin closed? (24 points, 57 comments)
    4. What can we, as a community, learn from the rise & acquisition of GitHub (23 points, 8 comments)
    5. 🍱 Rollup Roundup: Understanding Ethereum's Emerging Layer 2 (19 points, 1 comment)
    6. Video Tutorial: Introducing An Experience Dev To Smart Contract Coding (17 points, 3 comments)
    7. Do we need a blockchain to be decentralized? What questions would you ask a self described fan of decentralization, but blockchain skeptic? (11 points, 19 comments)
    8. ETH Block Rewards And Second Order Effects On Hardware Availability (7 points, 8 comments)
    9. Which Of The Big Tech Companies Is Most Likely To Bring Crypto Mainstream? Here's Why I Think It's Apple (4 points, 7 comments)
  11. 175 points, 9 submissions: galan77
    1. Is the Lightning Network a massive threat to the blockchain? (49 points, 66 comments)
    2. TPS of Lightning Network vs. Sharding, which one does better? (28 points, 7 comments)
    3. Are there any major downsides to sharding? (21 points, 33 comments)
    4. What's the difference between trustlessness and permissionlessness (19 points, 7 comments)
    5. Which consensus algorithm is the best, PoW, PoS, PoAuthority, PoAsset? (18 points, 57 comments)
    6. How can XRP reach 50,000 TPS when they have no sharding and every node has to validate every single transaction. (15 points, 14 comments)
    7. A few questions about the Lightning Network (14 points, 6 comments)
    8. Pascalcoin can do 72,000 tps apparently. Is this legit? The new Nano? (8 points, 39 comments)
    9. How does Ripple's (XRB's) consensus algorithm Proof of Correctness work, are there any downsides? (3 points, 23 comments)
  12. 175 points, 1 submission: ilielezi
    1. Why white papers in crypto world are so unprofessional? (175 points, 88 comments)
  13. 165 points, 6 submissions: CryptoMaximalist
    1. Facebook's Libra (48 points, 55 comments)
    2. “Fake Stake” attacks on some Proof-of-Stake cryptocurrencies responsibly disclosed by researchers from the Decentralized Systems Lab at UIUC (31 points, 9 comments)
    3. Quantum Computing and the Cryptography in Crypto (27 points, 14 comments)
    4. PING and REJECT attacks on ZCash (Patch available) | Stanford Applied Crypto Group (22 points, 1 comment)
    5. Introduction to Cryptography: Part 1 - Jinglan Wang (19 points, 1 comment)
    6. New site howmanyconfs.com shows the amount of time and confirmations of Proof of Work coins to match 6 confirmations on Bitcoin (18 points, 11 comments)
  14. 163 points, 10 submissions: GainsLean
    1. Videos For Developers Who Want To Learn Blockchain In A Practical Way (36 points, 17 comments)
    2. What Do You Want To Learn? (32 points, 20 comments)
    3. Get Involved With The Smart Contract Coding Challenge (25 points, 4 comments)
    4. Solution To $10K Art Prize (25 points, 3 comments)
    5. Blockchain Course Outline Has Been Released - Feedback warranted (22 points, 12 comments)
    6. Introduction To Distributed Systems And Consensus Protocols (9 points, 2 comments)
    7. Are there any closed source crypto wallets? (4 points, 19 comments)
    8. Are there any successful proof of identity projects? (4 points, 8 comments)
    9. SPV Wallets Vs API Wallets (4 points, 1 comment)
    10. 12 Popular Consensus Algorithms - Explained (2 points, 0 comments)
  15. 163 points, 7 submissions: QRCollector
    1. Part 5. I'm writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. This is the fifth part of the series talking about an advanced vulnerability of BTC. (43 points, 43 comments)
    2. I'm writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. This is the third part of the series introducing Quantum resistant blockchains. (36 points, 4 comments)
    3. Part 4B. I’m writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. This is the fourth part of the series explaining the special quality of going quantum resistant from genesis block. (25 points, 21 comments)
    4. Part 6. (Last part) I'm writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. Failing shortcuts in an attempt to accomplish Quantum Resistance (24 points, 38 comments)
    5. I'm writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. This is the first part of the series introducing the basic concept of blockchain and what makes it reliable. (23 points, 10 comments)
    6. I'm writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. This is the fourth part of the series explaining the special quality of going quantum resistant from genesis block. (7 points, 1 comment)
    7. Part 2. I'm writing a series about blockchain tech and possible future security risks. This is the second part of the series: An accessible description of hashing and signature schemes. (5 points, 0 comments)
  16. 162 points, 3 submissions: FashionistaGuru
    1. How do we change the culture around cryptocurrency? (118 points, 54 comments)
    2. Which cryptos have the best new user experience? (30 points, 34 comments)
    3. Why does Apple prevent many crypto apps from entering the App Store? (14 points, 8 comments)
  17. 157 points, 7 submissions: SamsungGalaxyPlayer
    1. Breaking Monero Episodes 1-3: Introduction, Ring Signatures, 0-Decoy and Chain Reactions (45 points, 1 comment)
    2. "No, dPoW Isn't a Perfect Solution" (35 points, 48 comments)
    3. Breaking Mimblewimble’s Privacy Model - Dragonfly Research (27 points, 10 comments)
    4. Breaking Monero (and Zcash) Episodes 7-9: Remote Nodes, Timing Attacks, Poisoned Outputs (EAE Attack) (21 points, 2 comments)
    5. "Attacker Collection of IP Metadata" (18 points, 10 comments)
    6. "Tracing Transactions Across Cryptocurrency Ledgers" Using Shapeshift and Changelly (6 points, 4 comments)
    7. Breaking Monero Episodes 4-6: Chain Splits (Key Image Attack), Input Selection Algorithm, Unusual Ringsize (5 points, 2 comments)
  18. 147 points, 1 submission: shunsaitakahashi
    1. Proof-of-Approval: Stake Based, 1 Block Finality & History Attack Defense (147 points, 4 comments)
  19. 146 points, 6 submissions: themoderndayhercules
    1. "The selfish mining fallacy" explained and debunked (60 points, 8 comments)
    2. A Discussion of Stable coins and Decentralized Oracles (35 points, 8 comments)
    3. A Selfish Mining Double Spending attack Simulator (25 points, 2 comments)
    4. Why reputation systems don't work (15 points, 12 comments)
    5. A better incentivization for Swarm (6 points, 0 comments)
    6. When Mises met Szabo - A Discussion of the value of Bitcoin (5 points, 16 comments)
  20. 143 points, 7 submissions: KomodoWorld
    1. Komodo Platform's core developer and founder jl777 has started his own blog on Medium. The blog is aimed for senior developers who want to learn about blockchain. (46 points, 15 comments)
    2. Delayed Proof of Work (dPoW) security explained (36 points, 46 comments)
    3. Proof-of-Gameplay (19 points, 3 comments)
    4. Good guide for getting started with the Custom Consensus tech for Komodo-based blockchains (17 points, 0 comments)
    5. Cross-chain migration of coins with Crypto Conditions - by smk762 (12 points, 0 comments)
    6. A step-by-step example of working with a Crypto Conditions based Oracle - by smk762 (10 points, 0 comments)
    7. Changing consensus rules on the fly with Crypto Conditions (3 points, 0 comments)
  21. 141 points, 8 submissions: Stormy1997
    1. What technical/business advantages does a private blockchain have over a SQL server? (49 points, 79 comments)
    2. Is sharding to scale bad? (24 points, 28 comments)
    3. How would one create a fiat gateway theoretically? (19 points, 19 comments)
    4. Looking for Stellar smart contract/side chain code examples (16 points, 1 comment)
    5. Question - Securing personal information on a centralized server with user-owned keys (13 points, 3 comments)
    6. How do blockchains/smart contracts communicate with oracles? (10 points, 4 comments)
    7. Bandwidth scaling for TPS (8 points, 2 comments)
    8. Best method to transmit detailed data between two parties via existing platforms (2 points, 1 comment)
  22. 141 points, 3 submissions: seventyfiver
    1. Why does Ethereum use Solidity while other ecosystems like NEO stick with popular ones like Java and C#? (94 points, 26 comments)
    2. Chainlink's initial Go implementation went live this morning. Has anyone reviewed the code and can comment on it's quality? (40 points, 3 comments)
    3. What are some great books on cryptoeconomics or blockchain technology? (7 points, 4 comments)
  23. 134 points, 6 submissions: johnny_milkshakes
    1. Sub dedicated to DAG based coins (42 points, 8 comments)
    2. Thoughts on this? (28 points, 38 comments)
    3. This is very interesting (24 points, 19 comments)
    4. Educational presentation by Clara Shikhelman (18 points, 0 comments)
    5. Ethics question. (12 points, 40 comments)
    6. How to scale on chain? (10 points, 30 comments)
  24. 127 points, 4 submissions: sukitrebek
    1. What are you currently obsessed with, and why? (58 points, 150 comments)
    2. Crypto-based social network without a cryptocurrency. (42 points, 23 comments)
    3. How does underlying architecture affect what kinds of applications are possible? (17 points, 3 comments)
    4. Holochain vs. Radix DLT (10 points, 11 comments)
  25. 126 points, 1 submission: RufusTheFirefly
    1. Everytime I try to investigate the technology behind Cardano(Ada), I come across the words "scientific" and "peer-reviewed" over and over but almost no actual details. Can someone fill how this coin actually works and where they are in development? (126 points, 49 comments)
  26. 112 points, 1 submission: rocksolid77
    1. Can we have a real debate about the Bitcoin scaling issue? (112 points, 89 comments)
  27. 110 points, 4 submissions: kelluk
    1. What one can learn from browsing 30 million Ethereum addresses (72 points, 21 comments)
    2. I wanted to categorize all coins/tokens, and this is my proposal (23 points, 33 comments)
    3. Should whitepapers be understood by ordinary people? (10 points, 41 comments)
    4. Querying the Ethereum blockchain: how to & what to? (5 points, 5 comments)
  28. 107 points, 1 submission: NewDietTrend
    1. Outside of currency and voting, blockchain is awful and shouldnt be used. Can anyone explain where blockchain is worth the cost? (107 points, 166 comments)
  29. 105 points, 1 submission: insette
    1. /CryptoTech PSA: there are broadly TWO TYPES of Decentralized Exchanges. Which type are you investing in? (105 points, 55 comments)
  30. 103 points, 3 submissions: dtheme
    1. How to accept crypto payments for digital downloads if you are a small business? Solutions, e-commerce sites are lacking (46 points, 38 comments)
    2. How many 24 letter seeds and "Bitcoin" keys can there be? (34 points, 24 comments)
    3. Is there any reason why the big tech companies are not getting into crypto? (23 points, 36 comments)
  31. 103 points, 3 submissions: dvnielng
    1. Why do so many of these businesses need a token? (Unsure) (61 points, 86 comments)
    2. DAPPS - Only coins that have intrinsic value? Ethereum , Neo? (31 points, 10 comments)
    3. How could blockchain work for expensive purchases/escrow? (11 points, 2 comments)
  32. 101 points, 1 submission: kickso
    1. Is NANO everything it says it is? (101 points, 96 comments)
  33. 98 points, 3 submissions: heart_mind_body
    1. How can we breathe some life into this sub? (56 points, 22 comments)
    2. Can anyone give an example for a technology that provides a "public permissioned blockchain"? (28 points, 16 comments)
    3. Can we do a discussion on ICON and "clusters of private chains connected to a public chain" ? (14 points, 13 comments)
  34. 97 points, 8 submissions: kelraku
    1. Thoughts on Mimblewimble? (23 points, 13 comments)
    2. Has anyone looked at the lelantus protocol? (18 points, 6 comments)
    3. How much control do developers have over the coins (18 points, 6 comments)
    4. Lesser known protocols? (11 points, 17 comments)
    5. Zerocoin and Blockchain Analysis (9 points, 5 comments)
    6. Zerocoin vs Cryptonote (7 points, 14 comments)
    7. Lightning network privacy (6 points, 13 comments)
    8. Integrity of the DAG (5 points, 17 comments)
  35. 96 points, 6 submissions: blockstasy
    1. How to Get to One Million Devs (32 points, 12 comments)
    2. The Decade in Blockchain — 2010 to 2020 in Review (27 points, 4 comments)
    3. Ethereum by the Numbers – The Year of 2019 (26 points, 9 comments)
    4. Knowledge Drop: Mining and the role it plays with the Ethereum blockchain (5 points, 0 comments)
    5. A great article that explains Ethereum’s Muir Glacier Update (4 points, 0 comments)
    6. Youtube Silences Crypto Community (2 points, 6 comments)
  36. 93 points, 3 submissions: OneOverNever
    1. Which is the last WHITE PAPER you've read that's truly impacted you? (77 points, 81 comments)
    2. [CMV] Bitcoin's intrinsic technological value. (14 points, 29 comments)
    3. What are some weak points that still hold XVG back from becoming a top player in crypto? (Technically speaking, not marketing and etc.) (2 points, 19 comments)
  37. 93 points, 3 submissions: ryano-ark
    1. (ARK) ACES Completes Integration of ARK Channels for Two-way Transfers for Easy ICOs When Paired With ARK Deployer (Push-Button-Blockchains) (57 points, 5 comments)
    2. (ARK) ACES Releases Fast (Ansible) Deployments for all ACES Applications. (23 points, 4 comments)
    3. A Future of Cryptocurrencies and Blockchains (13 points, 3 comments)
  38. 92 points, 2 submissions: BobUltra
    1. Our blockchains are all centralized! (51 points, 34 comments)
    2. List of qualities needed to dethrone Bitcoin. (41 points, 43 comments)
  39. 90 points, 1 submission: refreshx2
    1. CMV: It doesn't make sense for (crypto)companies to create coins linked to their tech (90 points, 18 comments)
  40. 89 points, 1 submission: perceptron01
    1. What does Nano do better than Steem? (89 points, 55 comments)
  41. 87 points, 1 submission: Shuk
    1. How does one begin to develop an employable skill in blockchain development? (87 points, 25 comments)
  42. 87 points, 1 submission: conorohiggins
    1. I spent three weeks researching and writing a huge guide to stablecoins. Enjoy! (87 points, 36 comments)
  43. 86 points, 1 submission: Bacon_Hero
    1. ELI5: Why did it take so long for blockchain technology to be created? (86 points, 66 comments)
  44. 85 points, 3 submissions: theFoot58
    1. If crypto now is like 'the Internet' of the past, where are we? (65 points, 53 comments)
    2. If the Internet had its Genesis Block, what would it be? (14 points, 9 comments)
    3. Coin grouping - ruby and CryptoCompare API (6 points, 1 comment)
  45. 85 points, 1 submission: youngm2
    1. Which decentralised exchange has the most promise for 2018? (85 points, 89 comments)
  46. 84 points, 4 submissions: bLbGoldeN
    1. On Mass Adoption of Cryptocurrencies (28 points, 68 comments)
    2. Join the Bloom team for our first tech AMA tomorrow (Tuesday, March 13th) at 7 PM GMT! (23 points, 2 comments)
    3. Join the Decred team for an AMA - Friday, June 1st from 19:00 to 22:00 UTC (17 points, 10 comments)
    4. Join the district0x team for an AMA Monday, April 2nd at 5:00 PM (GMT) (16 points, 0 comments)
  47. 82 points, 2 submissions: SubsequentDownfall
    1. Has a 51% attack ever been witnessed? (45 points, 46 comments)
    2. Is a DAG coin like RaiBlocks able to be private like Monero? (37 points, 40 comments)
  48. 82 points, 2 submissions: guidre
    1. Tron and other source Code (42 points, 24 comments)
    2. Why Will companies adopt blockchain, the user interface is complex and i'm not sure that many companies want all their internal dealings made public. (40 points, 19 comments)
  49. 81 points, 4 submissions: solar128
    1. New Atomic Swap Tools Released (35 points, 4 comments)
    2. Using Blockchain to make a censorship-resistant Reddit (28 points, 14 comments)
    3. Best security practices for addressing Spectre & Meltdown (13 points, 0 comments)
    4. Influence of on-chain governance weighted by wealth - good or bad? (5 points, 2 comments)
  50. 81 points, 2 submissions: Blockchainsapiens
    1. Blockchain study finds 0.00% success rate and vendors don't call back when asked for evidence (47 points, 30 comments)
    2. The elephant in the room: would the public ever use a volatile currency over a stable currency? (34 points, 45 comments)
  51. 81 points, 1 submission: Mycryptopedia
    1. Understanding the Tech Behind RaiBlocks (81 points, 7 comments)
  52. 81 points, 1 submission: davidvanbeveren
    1. Article thoroughly analysing / comparing IOTA and RaiBlocks (x-post /CryptoCurrency) (81 points, 10 comments)
  53. 77 points, 4 submissions: DeleteMyOldAccount
    1. HD Wallets Explained: What they are, and how to make them coin agnostic (28 points, 11 comments)
    2. Bitcoin Cash May 15th fork (23 points, 22 comments)
    3. So you want to build a Bitcoin HD wallet? Part 1 (23 points, 3 comments)
    4. Applications of Blockchain in Supply Chain (3 points, 9 comments)
  54. 76 points, 3 submissions: kryptofinger
    1. Why would anyone bother using any DPOS coins for dapps like Eos over normal systems like AWS? (44 points, 104 comments)
    2. Could a state backed privacy coin work? (22 points, 32 comments)
    3. Thoughts on Elastos? (10 points, 8 comments)
  55. 76 points, 1 submission: francohab
    1. 55% of the Nano representative nodes are "official representatives", presumably held by developers. How big of an issue is that? (76 points, 46 comments)
  56. 75 points, 2 submissions: MerkleChainsaw
    1. The biggest challenge for cryptocurrencies and how to mitigate it (73 points, 37 comments)
    2. Short and long term design tradeoffs in crypto (2 points, 2 comments)
  57. 75 points, 1 submission: jatsignwork
    1. Raiblocks & Spam (75 points, 60 comments)
  58. 74 points, 1 submission: behindtext
    1. Hello, this is Jake Yocom-Piatt. Ask me anything about Decred! (74 points, 49 comments)
  59. 73 points, 2 submissions: TexasRadical83
    1. Why use a new "currency" at all? (40 points, 48 comments)
    2. Why are big price increases for crypto a good thing? (33 points, 41 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. Neophyte- (1649 points, 746 comments)
  2. ndha1995 (583 points, 98 comments)
  3. turtleflax (406 points, 116 comments)
  4. senzheng (326 points, 193 comments)
  5. holomntn (294 points, 40 comments)
  6. manly_ (286 points, 43 comments)
  7. signos_de_admiracion (250 points, 18 comments)
  8. fgiveme (231 points, 77 comments)
  9. crypto_kang (222 points, 45 comments)
  10. jatsignwork (220 points, 37 comments)
  11. GainsLean (218 points, 76 comments)
  12. benthecarman (211 points, 48 comments)
  13. rockyrainy (200 points, 39 comments)
  14. hungryforitalianfood (197 points, 58 comments)
  15. rocksolid77 (190 points, 20 comments)
  16. bannercoin (189 points, 11 comments)
  17. insette (181 points, 47 comments)
  18. DiogenicOrder (175 points, 41 comments)
  19. islanavarino (173 points, 51 comments)
  20. behindtext (172 points, 14 comments)
  21. takitus (171 points, 25 comments)
  22. sukitrebek (170 points, 42 comments)
  23. UnknownEssence (170 points, 31 comments)
  24. crypto_ha (170 points, 26 comments)
  25. AlexCoventry (167 points, 17 comments)
  26. DragonWhsiperer (165 points, 38 comments)
  27. stop-making-accounts (164 points, 57 comments)
  28. KnifeOfPi2 (157 points, 13 comments)
  29. Edgegasm (156 points, 42 comments)
  30. ippond (152 points, 15 comments)
  31. dontlikecomputers (151 points, 61 comments)
  32. QRCollector (150 points, 46 comments)
  33. alexrecuenco (145 points, 18 comments)
  34. BobUltra (144 points, 88 comments)
  35. SpamCamel (135 points, 22 comments)
  36. InterdisciplinaryHum (133 points, 107 comments)
  37. theglitteringone (132 points, 10 comments)
  38. ChocolateSunrise (128 points, 23 comments)
  39. PM_ME_UR_QUINES (125 points, 4 comments)
  40. narwhale111 (122 points, 15 comments)
  41. pepe_le_shoe (121 points, 47 comments)
  42. Darius510 (119 points, 39 comments)
  43. glen-hodl (118 points, 21 comments)
  44. HOG_ZADDY (117 points, 23 comments)
  45. coranos2 (116 points, 44 comments)
  46. etherenvoy (116 points, 15 comments)
  47. johnny_milkshakes (115 points, 55 comments)
  48. galan77 (115 points, 52 comments)
  49. hybridsole (113 points, 40 comments)
  50. funciton (113 points, 8 comments)
  51. Mr0ldy (110 points, 24 comments)
  52. Corm (109 points, 42 comments)
  53. cryptoscopia (109 points, 7 comments)
  54. ReportFromHell (106 points, 39 comments)
  55. broscientologist (105 points, 26 comments)
  56. straytjacquet (104 points, 28 comments)
  57. Quadling (101 points, 24 comments)
  58. BlockEnthusiast (101 points, 17 comments)
  59. thats_not_montana (99 points, 37 comments)
  60. TheRealMotherOfOP (98 points, 27 comments)
  61. yarauuta (96 points, 11 comments)
  62. pegasuspect93 (96 points, 1 comment)
  63. andrew_bao (93 points, 40 comments)
  64. samdotla (93 points, 6 comments)
  65. melodious_punk (91 points, 34 comments)
  66. Mquantum (91 points, 31 comments)
  67. TJ_Hooker15 (91 points, 27 comments)
  68. NoFaptain99 (91 points, 3 comments)
  69. ilielezi (87 points, 10 comments)
  70. Raapop (87 points, 2 comments)
  71. Allways_Wrong (86 points, 36 comments)
  72. bLbGoldeN (86 points, 19 comments)
  73. ResIpsaLoquiturrr (86 points, 15 comments)
  74. kabelman93 (85 points, 29 comments)
  75. no_pants_gamer (84 points, 9 comments)
  76. AnkurTechracers (83 points, 16 comments)
  77. ric2b (83 points, 11 comments)
  78. Big_Goose (83 points, 10 comments)
  79. Lifeistooshor1 (82 points, 21 comments)
  80. vornth (82 points, 11 comments)
  81. Sargos (81 points, 25 comments)
  82. refreshx2 (81 points, 16 comments)
  83. Qwahzi (78 points, 27 comments)
  84. StupidRandomGuy (77 points, 35 comments)
  85. WikiTextBot (77 points, 24 comments)
  86. SnootyEuropean (77 points, 5 comments)
  87. cryptogainz (76 points, 14 comments)
  88. frequentlywrong (76 points, 4 comments)
  89. the_defiant (76 points, 4 comments)
  90. BrangdonJ (75 points, 28 comments)
  91. hendrik_v (75 points, 7 comments)
  92. solar128 (74 points, 18 comments)
  93. foobazzler (74 points, 8 comments)
  94. ginger_beer_m (73 points, 35 comments)
  95. kAhmij (73 points, 25 comments)
  96. DeleteMyOldAccount (73 points, 20 comments)
  97. sn0wr4in (73 points, 9 comments)
  98. Dyslectic_Sabreur (72 points, 5 comments)
  99. X7spyWqcRY (71 points, 8 comments)
  100. Krapser (70 points, 5 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. A Guided Reading of Bitcoin’s Original White Paper by Realness100 (202 points, 10 comments)
  2. From a technical standpoint: Why does every blockchain projects need their own coins? by HSPremier (181 points, 50 comments)
  3. Bitcoin Gold hit by Double Spend Attack (51% attack). The Attacker reversed 22 blocks. by rockyrainy (179 points, 102 comments)
  4. Why white papers in crypto world are so unprofessional? by ilielezi (175 points, 88 comments)
  5. My brief observation of most common Consensus Algorithms by tracyspacygo (159 points, 49 comments)
  6. Proof-of-Approval: Stake Based, 1 Block Finality & History Attack Defense by shunsaitakahashi (147 points, 4 comments)
  7. "Do you need a Blockchain?" - this paper is fantastic, everyone should read this before evaluating a coin and if requires a block chain to solve a solution the coin is promising to solve. by Neophyte- (136 points, 41 comments)
  8. Technical comparison of LIGHTNING vs TANGLE vs HASHGRAPH vs NANO by Qwahzi (133 points, 37 comments)
  9. Everytime I try to investigate the technology behind Cardano(Ada), I come across the words "scientific" and "peer-reviewed" over and over but almost no actual details. Can someone fill how this coin actually works and where they are in development? by RufusTheFirefly (126 points, 49 comments)
  10. How do we change the culture around cryptocurrency? by FashionistaGuru (118 points, 54 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 160 points: holomntn's comment in ELI5: Why did it take so long for blockchain technology to be created?
  2. 121 points: KnifeOfPi2's comment in How do we change the culture around cryptocurrency?
  3. 105 points: theglitteringone's comment in Outside of currency and voting, blockchain is awful and shouldnt be used. Can anyone explain where blockchain is worth the cost?
  4. 102 points: benthecarman's comment in If crypto now is like 'the Internet' of the past, where are we?
  5. 96 points: pegasuspect93's comment in If crypto now is like 'the Internet' of the past, where are we?
  6. 95 points: bannercoin's comment in Realistically, why would anybody expect the startup crypto platforms to beat out the corporate giants who are developing their own Blockchain as a Service (BaaS) solutions? Ex. IBM, SAP, JP Morgan...
  7. 83 points: AlexCoventry's comment in Ethereum private key with all zeroes leads to an account with 5000$ on it
  8. 82 points: deleted's comment in Is blockchain really useful ?
  9. 81 points: signos_de_admiracion's comment in Why white papers in crypto world are so unprofessional?
  10. 78 points: NoFaptain99's comment in Why do so many of these businesses need a token? (Unsure)
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
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EDC Blockchain and ECRO System in the List of Major Blockchain Events 2019!

EDC Blockchain and ECRO System in the List of Major Blockchain Events 2019!
https://preview.redd.it/1n0i4hayx4a41.jpg?width=1307&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=a1ddf95e43b81cacc10b29824c162c2d19bc2fc0
2019 showed that the Blockchain industry justifies the status of a technological revolution. Bitcoin's capitalization exceeded that of countries such as Turkey, Pakistan and South Africa. And China, India, and Nigeria have already bought cars, real estate and various services for an EDC coin!
Let's think about these and other events of last year, which had the greatest resonance.
Adoption of the cryptography law in China
Speculation and fiction are officially over! China at the state level said "yes" to Blockchain technology! The Chinese Communist Party now directly manages the Central Cryptography Agency. The agency will promote and support cryptography research, protect intellectual property rights and promote the development of public/private key technology, according to Primitive Foundation partner Dovey Wan.
Against this background, the Central Bank of China started talking about creating its own stablecoin, and Chinese President Xi Jinping said that the blockchain will be the main technology for important innovation breakthroughs! The Crypto market reacted instantly: bitcoin rose by more than $2000 in one week of October (from $7500 to $9500), while EDC quotations reached 1 US cents. The optimism then decreased again when it became clear that the Chinese are still fundamentally distinguishing between the notions of "Blockchain" and "Cryptocurrencies".
Bitcoin futures launch
On September 23, 2019, ICE Corporation (International Exchange) started trading daily and month bitcoin futures on the Bakkt platform.
The platform was officially approved by the U.S. Futures Trading Commission (CFTC), and bitcoin deposits of users are insured for $125 million.
The appearance of this platform was associated with certain expectations: the growth of bitcoin to $ 20,000, and the accession of institutional investors. As we already know, these forecasts did not come true, and the peak daily trading volume did not exceed $43 million. Nevertheless, the expectations from this news remain high: both the prestige and liquidity of the market can only improve.
Project Libra's failure
On June 18, the release of Facebook's own cryptographic currency called Libra was to be launched. By all primary signs, the coin could become a market favorite, and the project participants included Visa, Mastercard, eBay, and other major online platforms.
However, it did not work out: problems with regulators reached the hearings in the U.S. Congress, where Mark Zuckerberg himself had to personally promise that Libra will not be launched until all regulators approve of it, and Facebook may even leave the founders.
Project stoppage TON
GRAM Token from Telegram is another "loser" in the big games of life. The developers managed to make the initial offer (ICO) for 1.7 billion dollars and even presented a compiled test wallet. But the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) expressed confidence that GRAM at the token trading stage was sold illegally, falling under the definition of a security.
Now Pavel Durov is facing long legal proceedings, and the project is frozen for an indefinite period. This "triumph" of U.S. market regulators once again underscores the fact that big money at the stage of the birth of new players on the crypto market plays a much smaller role than the real value of coins and technology.
EDC Blockchain Coin constructor for entrepreneurs
Producers of goods and services and businessmen in various niches can now create their own bonus token or a full-fledged cryptographic currency using PoS mining without having at their disposal a team of IT professionals, ICO access opportunities or huge investments. Specialists of the EDC Blockchain platform offered the market a technological coin constructor and ready-made package solutions for the development of small and medium businesses.
It has never been easier to token and scale any project or startup. The constructor is available to all users of the EDC platform, which offers customers a number of bonuses (for example, an automatic listing of new coins on partner exchanges, marketing support and advertising at the level of its international community). A real step forward in business tokenization.
Start of a self-contained blockchain ecosystem ECRO System
Specialists of ECRO Chain Holding, under whose leadership ECRO System projects function, were able to create a "bridge" between the crypto industry and real business.
ECRO System provides an environment for cooperation between manufacturers, sellers and consumers anywhere in the world, including global marketplace, exchange, trading platform, a launching platform for startups, additional services and even an academy for educational purposes. In a global eco-system using a blockchain, a variety of goods and services are safely sold and purchased, any coins are exchanged conveniently and quickly, and new technology projects are made possible. And the ecosystem is expanding geographically by training its own marketers. Application of blockchain, technologies of an artificial intellect, a crypto-merchant allow ECRO System to create conditions for the reliable digital economy.
Crypto trading authorization for German banks
The Bundesrat passed a law allowing German banking institutions to officially sell and buy cryptocurrencies. Discussions in financial circles are still ongoing, as confidential transfers open up space for illegal transactions and money laundering. But the fact is that Vice-Chancellor of Germany Olaf Scholz advocated the creation of a national digital currency, and Sven Hildebrandt, head of the consulting company DLC, is confident that Germany will become a "cryptocurrency paradise".
Official cooperation of Ukraine with Binance Crypto Exchange
Binance International exchange has signed an official memorandum on cooperation with the Ministry of Digital Transformation of Ukraine. Popularization and legalization of the cryptographic industry in Ukraine led to a sharp increase in the interest of global exchange and trading services to start working in one of the largest European countries.
On November 6, the Verkhovna Rada adopted a draft law on the implementation of FATF rules, which regulates all basic concepts and legal aspects of virtual assets that can be considered as property or can be used for payment and investment purposes.
The draft law on asset tokenization, which will allow private and public companies to conduct commercial transactions with their assets in the form of tokens or crypto-stocks, is under development.
We are living at the peak of historical technology development when the speed of real technical changes outpaces even the speed of human imagination. The year 2020 could be a "quantum leap" in cryptographic technology around the world.
The world economy, as well as small and medium businesses, seems to be best prepared for the wide range of opportunities offered by the Blockchain. The EDC Blockchain and ECRO System project teams will continue to develop their products and services in order to maximize the quality of life of modern people through blockchain innovations. We wish you a successful 2020 year filled with new technologies!
via https://blockchain.mn
#edcblockchain #cryptocurrency #global_platform #graphene #lpos #coin_constructor #masternode #leasing #edc #edccoin #edcmining
submitted by EDC-Blockchain to u/EDC-Blockchain [link] [comments]

Large Enterprise Adoption of Blockchain is happening, enabled by Quant Network’s Overledger

Large Enterprise Adoption of Blockchain is happening, enabled by Quant Network’s Overledger
https://medium.com/@CryptoSeq/large-enterprise-adoption-of-blockchain-is-happening-enabled-by-quant-networks-overledger-32321b650115
This is Part Two in the mini-series looking at Quant Network. You can see Part One here as well as links to other articles at the bottom of this post.
Quant Network have achieved incredible levels of adoption since launching Overledger less than a year ago. Their growth strategy is to partner with multinational global organisations with huge amounts of employees to then host / implement / take Overledger to each of their own clients. So one Partnership, leads to exponentially more and is the fastest way to scale rather than trying to partner with each customer individually. This is how companies such as Oracle grew so fast and Microsoft with their Partner Network.
These are multinational global organisations with 100,000 + employees, this is the scale that we are working towards to take Overledger to the mass market. We can’t do it one by one in each country and sign them up but we can partner with someone that has 100 customers and they can take it to all their customers as well which helps with the adoption of our technology” — Gilbert Verdian
Let’s start with arguably the biggest partnership for any Blockchain company listed on Coinmarketcap, the leading Financial Network Provider in Europe, SIA.

SIA

  • Provide the leading Financial Network in Europe with more than 100 Tier 1 banks connected, 44 Trading venues (including the main international stock markets in Milan, Rome, London, Frankfurt and New York) and other financial institutions covering the entire trading process from pre-trading to post-trading
  • process 14 Billion institutional services transactions, 7.2 billion card transactions, 3 billion payments, 51.7 billion financial transactions and carried 1,204 terabytes of data on the network
  • SIA in partnership with Colt and SWIFT are the only two network providers awarded a 10 year tender commissioned by the European Central Bank for the provisioning of connectivity services allowing European central and commercial banks, central depositories, automated clearing houses and other payment service providers to connect directly to Eurosystem market infrastructures through a single access interface (Eurosystem Single Market Infrastructure Gateway — ESMIG).
  • SIA’s SIAchain is the leading blockchain architecture in Europe connecting 570 Banks, Central Banks, Trading Venues and other Financial Institutions using R3’s Corda, Permissioned variants of Ethereum and Hyperledger Fabric.
  • SIA have Integrated Overledger into the leading blockchain architecture in Europe SIAchain so that all of the 570 banks, Central Banks, Trading venues etc can benefit from Blockchain Interoperability.
“Since the European launch of our private infrastructure SIAchain, we are at the forefront of innovation in blockchain technology with the aim of supporting financial markets with a high-performance and secure architecture and a clear governance model. We actively continue on our path of innovation and the achievement of a fully interoperable blockchain network is the foremost objective we want to reach with the collaboration of Quant Network and its disruptive vision on DLT”, says Daniele Savarè, Innovation & Business Solutions Director, SIA.
https://youtu.be/0cNmGrLPoTo
So what we’ve done is instead of just announcing one client and one thing, we’re announcing that we’re working with SIA. So, SIA is the leading European payment infrastructure. And what we’re doing with SIA is interconnecting blockchain networks with SIA, and doing settlements, which are central bank settlements, with the central bank in Italy. So what Overledger is doing is we’re actually bringing blockchain and interoperability to all of SIA’s clients, which are 580 banks. So, Overledger could be rolled out to all these institutions, financial services, banks, at scale, and have interoperability to get the benefits of this.
To read more see my other article which goes into more details about SIA here
https://preview.redd.it/dbpfz3914pn31.png?width=1148&format=png&auto=webp&s=f9e6b3db87954f2e86a4ce2e060646fa440e8543

AX Trading

Quant Network are working with AX Trading to bring more digital assets, securities and tokenised assets to their existing 800 institutional traders in an already live and connected FINRA and SEC regulated exchange. AX Trading is not just about trading securities but other digital assets such as Bitcoin, Ethereum and potentially even Quant in the Future.
  • an SEC-registered broker-dealer and Alternative Trading System (ATS) Operator. They are a member of FINRA and SIPC regulated authorities.
  • Have investors and sponsored brokers such as Credit Suisse, (a multinational investment Bank and Financial services company worth $27.5 billion).
  • AX currently have over 800 Institutional traders (these are not individuals, but corporations such as hedge funds, banks, investment banks, pension funds, insurance companies, endowment funds etc).
  • AX Trading have also partnered with Euronext, the largest Stock Exchange in Europe with a market cap of $4.65 trillion as of 2018, in the creation of Euronext Block which utilises AX Trading.
  • This is a multi-trillion dollar market with huge global enterprises, traditional exchanges and global banks are all adopting DLT at a rapid pace and going into production at scale in a matter of months
Overledger a blockchain operating system, will enable universal interoperability for regulatory-compliant security tokens and digital assets to be traded on AX ATS, a regulated secondary trading market. AX intends to integrate Overledger to help foster the evolution of traditional capital markets infrastructure to facilitate the mass implementation of regulated digital assets. With the increased market adoption of digital assets and banking “coins” such as JPMorgan Coin, AX and Quant Network are at the forefront to enable the transferability and movement of digital assets
George O’Krepkie, AX CEO said: “we look forward to partnering with Quant. Their technology will allow our blockchain agnostic security token exchange to communicate seamlessly with issuers, traders, investors, and regulators across different blockchain protocols. This is a key technological breakthrough that will help us bring the benefits of security tokens to Main Street and Wall Street.”
To read more see my other article which goes into more details about Wall Street 2.0: Enabled by Quant Network’s Partnership with SEC & FINRA registered AX Trading here
https://preview.redd.it/on9hbjk54pn31.png?width=1286&format=png&auto=webp&s=ca9ed465376e483801cf87e8933f0e718be915b4

Oracle

  • Oracle are the second largest software company in the world, second only to Microsoft and worth $174.5 billion.
  • Quant Network are an Oracle Fintech Partner. Oracle are jointly going to market with Quant Network and taking Overledger directly to their 480,000 clients globally.
  • On the week commencing the 23rd September 2019 Quant Network and Oracle will be showcasing Overledger at the largest Financial event of the year SIBOS. SIBOS is a very exclusive financial services only event that only institutions that are connected to SWIFT can attend. The only 2 Blockchain firms attending are Quant Network and Ripple.
At Sibos 2019 Oracle is excited to feature 10 of our fintechs that have proven they are enterprise cloud ready and span a wide range of digital transformation themes including several available on Oracle’s Open Banking API ecosystem. Discover how you can accelerate your digital banking journey with a wide range of proven Oracle fintech solutions that meet the security, performance, and compliance needs for today’s Adaptive Bank — Oracle SIBOS 2019 Blockchain Enables Trustworthy Transactions The potential uses of blockchain technologies are seemingly endless, from providing easy access to online payments to creating connected economies. But one of blockchain’s standout promises is to automate trust by providing an incorruptible platform for transactions. Quant’s Overledger is the world’s first blockchain operating system. It’s designed to provide any network in the world with a gateway to all other blockchains, and therefore enable companies to develop new solutions by incorporating features from multiple blockchain applications. — https://blogs.oracle.com/startup/innovation-pays%3a-the-five-fintech-startups-making-money-more-interesting
https://preview.redd.it/bv0hxxr84pn31.png?width=1100&format=png&auto=webp&s=8e67dd4a7b23eae444ed1ed9e7f7bda972236280

Crowdz

  • Crowdz are the leading blockchain-based trade finance company
  • Headed by Cisco’s former global supply-chain leader
  • In business since 2014, with 270+ beta clients
  • partnered with Barclaycard, part of Barclays Bank, to integrate into their payment solutions
  • Recently received $5.5 million Series A Investment from Barclays Bank and BOLD Capital Partners, with additional investments coming from TFX Capital Partners, Techstars Ventures, and First Derivatives
  • In talks with the Korean Government about using their tech.
Payson Johnston, President and CEO of Crowdz, a Silicon Valley trade-finance and financial-technology company, stated that, “Although Crowdz uses the Ethereum blockchain as the foundation for our Invoice Auction Exchange, we have needed a solution that allows for invoices and other documents to be transferred from one blockchain to another — for example, among Hyperledger, Corda, and EOS. With the Overledger solution from Quant Network, it is now possible to pass data among different blockchains. Crowdz looks forward to working with Quant Network to enable the true multi-blockchain environment that our customers demand.”
You can read more about the announcement here

AuCloud and UKCloud

  • UKCloudX is the UK Sovereign High assurance cloud services designed for the UK’s most sensitive and mission critical systems from Defence, National Security to wider Government requirements.
  • AUCloud is Australia’s sovereign cloud Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) provider, exclusively focused on the Australian Government (Federal, State and Local) and Critical National Industry (CNI) communities.
  • AuCloud integrate Overledger onto the AUCloud platform to provide highly secure and interoperable Blockchain-as-a-Service for Australian Government and Defence and the critical national industries and supply chains that serve the nation.
Scott Wilkie, Director of AUCloud stated that Australian Government, Department of Defence and major industries are using or testing blockchain to interact with their supply chain, critical infrastructure, national record keeping and financial services. These organisations require the interoperable functionality that can only come with an operating system like Overledger and the security of the leading sovereign Australian cloud platform. Without Overledger, none of these projects or systems will be able to communicate with each other or enable cross party collaboration. Brad Bastow, CTO AUCloud (previously CTO Department of the Prime Minster & Cabinet) stated that “applying world leading blockchain technologies to enhancing the cyber security of cloud IaaS and PaaS can significantly improve the ease of adoption and reduces risks for all government users and citizens. We aim to bring the most effective and assured technologies as-a-Service and Quant Network have some of the most advanced blockchain technology in the world in this respect.”
You can read more about the announcement here

SIMBA Chain

  • A Cloud-based, smart-contract-as-a-service (SCaas) platform. enabling users across a variety of skill sets to implement DAPPs.
  • formed from a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) grant in 2017 originally developed by ITAMCO and the University of Notre Dame
  • Awarded a grant from the Department of Energy to develop a platform for a blockchain solution for the solar energy market.
  • Their platform is available on Azure and are Microsoft Start Up Partners with a former Microsoft Global Exec Joining SIMBA Chain.
  • Some of their other partnerships include the Government Blockchain Association, Air Force Research Laboratory, Caterpillar, SAP and EY
  • Recently announced they are starting to develop on Quant Network’s Overledger to enable connection to all of the blockchains currently connected through Overledger and provide interoperability between them.
https://preview.redd.it/blpktdhc4pn31.png?width=438&format=png&auto=webp&s=ddf8bbad9bb1c2e32e84718b03fdac08e1f46663

https://preview.redd.it/lv7c8upd4pn31.png?width=1085&format=png&auto=webp&s=33c1b51f8b4b4479de99ac37ea4def67b348fe5e
https://youtu.be/u4ymv3AM_Us

AllianceBlock

  • an AI-powered decentralized investment and financing ecosystem, which allows corporates to quickly, cheaply and safely raise funds, whether it be equity, debt or tokens.
  • Selected as 1 of 15 Best Early-Stage startups at Money 20/20, Europe’s Largest Finetech Conference.
  • Joined Kickstart Innovation, one of Europe’s largest multi-corporate accelerators.
  • Joined Level39 Europe’s largest Fintech Accelerator
  • Partnered with Holochain, Elastos and Portugal Finlab
  • have more than 35 years combined experience in capital markets at top investment banks (Goldman, JP Morgan, Barclays…) and more than 10 years in AI, IT and software development (Barclays, VINCI, PostNL…).
“AllianceBlock will use Overledger to leverage multiple blockchains and create multi-chains token swaps. This partnership offers the possibility to open a new set of real-world applications leveraging different features from different chains. AllianceBlock is delighted about this partnership which will help blockchain projects and SMEs wield blockchain technology very easily” said Rachid Ajaja, Co-founder of AllianceBlock.

Jiangsu Huaxin Blockchain Institute

  • the first state-owned research hub dedicated to exploring blockchain technology for the Chinese Ministry of Commerce with over 100 employees.
  • high-tech R & D institution backed by the provincial government in Jiangsu, the second highest GDP grossing province in China
  • Backed by parent company Beijing Huaxin Electronics Enterprise Group, a conglomerate that has incubated and invested in numerous IT and telecommunications companies
  • China’s official institution for blockchain development, signed an agreement to collaborate on the development of innovations like distributed computing and quantum cryptography to revolutionize the next generation of distributed ledger technology (DLT) protocols.
  • Quant Network have signed a MoU for a 5 year cooperation

Atlantic Power Exchange

  • An Early Stage start-up developing P2P energy software enabling automated trading of green and sustainable electricity over the blockchain
  • Creating an Upstream Energy exchange which interconnects existing P2P exchanges (like PowerLedger, WePower, GridSingularity etc) to multiple stakeholders, suppliers and customers in Australia.
  • All Built on Overledger

Managing Director of Rockefeller Capital Joins the Board of Quant Network

  • Rockefeller Capital Management is a leading independent financial services firm led by President & Chief Executive Officer Gregory J. Fleming, offering global family office, wealth management, asset management and strategic advisory services to ultra-high-net-worth individuals, families, institutions and corporations
  • Rockefeller Capital Management manages over $19 Billion in Assets with the aim of expanding this to $100 billion within 5 years.
Guy Dietrich, Managing Director, Rockefeller Capital commented:
“I’m delighted to join the Board of Quant Network. This is an exceptional team of experienced professionals in the cybersecurity and blockchain industry.”
Guy Dietrich recently personally attended meetings with the UK’s Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) with Gilbert.

https://preview.redd.it/pko3capi4pn31.png?width=548&format=png&auto=webp&s=a200a3cb342a6ff848defcc94157cdee37c723af

International Organization for Standardization (ISO)

Gilbert Verdian is the founder of ISO TC 307, the global standard for Blockchain and Distributed Ledger Technologies which 55 countries are currently working towards. Gilbert is the chairman for the TC 307 Working Group for Interoperability of blockchain and distributed ledger technology systems

https://preview.redd.it/vfk2sgnk4pn31.png?width=1133&format=png&auto=webp&s=edd7ac8f51a9e08742f9754cec92cf1bcc0539ff

European’s Union INATBA

Quant Network is a founding member in the European Union’s launch of the International Association for Trusted Blockchain Applications (INATBA). Other members of INATBA include Accenture, Accord Project, Alastria,Banco Santander, BBVA, Consensys, Enterprise Ethereum Alliance, Fujitsu, IOTA, Ledger, SAP, SIA, Swift, Telefonica, We.Trade and many more. INATBA is a collaboration of 26 EU countries to develop EU blockchain regulation and prepare the launch of EU-wide blockchain applications

Pay.UK

  • Quant Network accepted as a company guarantor of Pay.UK, the UK’s largest payment network, alongside banks and other FinTech companies
  • Through this relationship, Quant Network will shape the payment ecosystem to promote competition, innovation and openness, as well as setting the strategic direction of the Payments infrastructure and adopting the New Payments Architecture (NPA).
https://preview.redd.it/e6v2eqom4pn31.png?width=438&format=png&auto=webp&s=87de79c1bf4a7a3207b5f9f17ee496da94662f54
You can read more about it here and here
https://preview.redd.it/10okaogo4pn31.png?width=1454&format=png&auto=webp&s=99f7696dd6994b74960d2d017cb06d97304221a4

MOBI

  • consortium for blockchain innovation in the mobility industry. The consortium was founded by leading automakers including Renault, Ford, GM, and BMW, and now represents more than 80 percent of global auto manufacturing by volume. Other members include Bosch, IBM, Cognizant, Accenture, Consensys, IOTA, R3, VeChain, Hyperledger, Ocean Protocol and Honda (Full list can be seen here)
  • Overledger operating system will enable interconnectivity and interoperability of data between manufacturers, devices, transportation and autonomous vehicles
https://preview.redd.it/9e6tfv9q4pn31.png?width=1138&format=png&auto=webp&s=29956ae26b72c0bae6d55c63945108e7a8dd2e0b

Hyperledger

  • Quant Network has joined Hyperledger where more than 270 organisations are now contributing to the growth of Hyperledger’s open source distributed ledger frameworks and tools. Some of the companies involved are Accentrue, Airbus, American Express, Baidu, Cisco, Deutsche Bank, DTCC, Fujitsu, Hitachi, IBM, Intel, J.P.Morgan, SAP, BBVA, Bosch, Deloitte, Fedex, Huawei, Lenovo, NTT Data, Oracle, PWC, R3, Ripple, Samsung, We.trade, Bank of England, Enterprise Ethereum Alliance, Federal Reserve, MOBI etc. Full list of members can be seen here.
  • Working with the Hyperledger Quilt team to enhance Blockchain Interoperability capability for Hyperledger members

Accord Project

  • The Accord Project is the organization for the development of techno-legal standards for smart legal contracts and distributed ledger applications in the legal industry
  • The Project operates in collaboration with IEEE, the International Association for Contract and Commercial Management, Hyperledger, R3, Decentralized Identity Foundation, and a number of leading trade associations, industry and standards organizations, and world leading law firms.
  • Quant Network have joined the Accord Project and are providing the Technology with Overledger and Treaty Contracts.
https://preview.redd.it/9o790gjs4pn31.png?width=1086&format=png&auto=webp&s=a5475b58acef6e9544236f2adcc6b6fb760c49e2

As well as many being worked on and yet to be publicly announced:

HCL Technologies

  • Indian Multinational IT Service and consulting company with offices in 44 countries and 137,000+ employees
  • Among the top 20 largest publicly traded companies in India with a market cap of $18.7 Billion and revenue of $9 billion.
  • Customers include 250 of the Fortune 500 and 650 of the Global 2000 companies.
we are really looking at ASIA, especially around Singapore, Hong Kong and we are working with partners to go there, just yesterday we had a meeting with a $8 billion company based in the ASIA region and they want to use Overledger for their clients and they are going to help us expand to that region, once we partner with the right bigger players
https://youtu.be/G1b9TX6rcuI
https://preview.redd.it/ac3f0yjv4pn31.png?width=827&format=png&auto=webp&s=dc1bfde0a476ee6ffbcb15284236dbb5d9d508e9

2 of the Big 4 Global Consultancy Firms are taking Quant Network’s Overledger to their clients.

The Big 4 Global Consultancy firms are huge and consist of Deloitte, PwC, EY and KPMG. They offer a range of services from offering consultancy advice on what to use, assisted prototyping right through to the delivery of production-ready enterprise solutions. Previously Gilbert was the Director of Cybersecurity at PwC and a Senior Manager of Security at EY plus Lara Verdian was the director for Deloitte Access Economics at Deloitte.
https://preview.redd.it/2hklfapx4pn31.png?width=697&format=png&auto=webp&s=d8181a12c888de00f4cbc6a4ff639697acc4deee
Quant Network are currently working with 2 of the above 4 global consultancy firms who are taking Overledger to their clients.

As well as many other consultancy firms:
https://preview.redd.it/usoyx5b15pn31.png?width=1215&format=png&auto=webp&s=a60b243d74e50dbc97ada380001f6f9396c8bb5b

Quant Health

  • Quant are working the Government of Armenia in Health, futureproofing the eHealth Strategy with Blockchain
https://preview.redd.it/7wkjbb045pn31.png?width=429&format=png&auto=webp&s=440f568ecb1ce8f587552e2e196b357c21f5592d
  • Working with huge Conglomerates to establish a new consortium in Healthcare
https://preview.redd.it/fbvia5r65pn31.png?width=1395&format=png&auto=webp&s=dfe009348deedb06844970d11d4b6a0d7e768ab1

Exchanges

They are also in talks with Traditional Exchanges such as the Swiss Stock Exchange SDX Platform and others as well as Large asset management firms
https://preview.redd.it/cn3ylk295pn31.png?width=1254&format=png&auto=webp&s=1b24c2088383aa5438b9d97bd54c34867b1cb137
As well as various Governments including the Australian Treasury with DATA61 regarding open banking and consumer data rights, the UK’s HMRC, Central Banks, Global companies in Korea, Insurance Companies, Airlines and Logistic companies.
https://preview.redd.it/t35ctv3b5pn31.png?width=1237&format=png&auto=webp&s=311762c9dbdc2755001b9b1a426dbe0206105574
It’s truly remarkable what they have achieved in such a short space of time, working non-stop all around the globe, working with enormous Global organisations, Leading Financial Institutions, Governments and Health. Quant Network is enabling the mass adoption of Blockchain, bridging all blockchains and offchain networks together (as well as plans to connect directly to the Internet) to achieve the true potential of this revolutionary technology.
In the last article of this mini-series I will take a closer look at the tokenomics of the QNT token and why there isn’t another utility token with as much value as QNT. With a tiny total supply of just 14.6 million QNT tokens, with no inflation, Supply reducing further as tokens are taken out circulation with licensing and strong demand / usage for the token, as well as minimum QNT holdings for wallets to benefit from Universal Interoperability.
Part One — Blockchain Fundamentals
Part Two — The Layers Of Overledger
Part Three — TrustTag and the Tokenisation of data
Part Four — Features Overledger provides to MAPPs
Part Five — Creating the Standards for Interoperability
Part Six — The Team behind Overledger and Partners
Part Seven — The QNT Token
Part Eight — Enabling Enterprise Mass Adoption
Quant Network Enabling Mass Adoption of Blockchain at a Rapid Pace
Quant Network Partner with SIA, A Game Changer for Mass Blockchain Adoption by Financial Institutions
Part One of this mini Series — What is a blockchain operating system and what are the benefits? Introducing Overledger from Quant Network
Wall Street 2.0: How Blockchain will revolutionise Wall Street and a closer look at Quant Network’s Partnership with AX Trading
submitted by xSeq22x to QuantNetwork [link] [comments]

Quantum Computing  The Biggest Threat to Bitcoin?? (Must Watch) The World's Most Secure Hardware Wallet - NGRAVE CEO on World Class Tech Partnership Quantum Computers: Will they break cryptography? Securing ourselves through quantum cryptography How to Brute Force a Bitcoin Wallet with Hashcat

Now even though Honeywell’s quantum computer is quite powerful, in order to break Bitcoin’s 256-bit cryptography, it would take anywhere between 2,000 to 3,000 qubits of computing power. Bitcoin’s claim of inviolability and unhackability is gone, and you have access to any Bitcoin wallet you want. Two major quantum algorithms that threaten the current state of cryptography have already been developed: Grover's and Shor's algorithms. The second potential method of attack is by overtaking control of the whole network. Through the sheer speed of computation, a quantum computer could overwhelm the rest of the miner nodes on the Bitcoin network and attain at least 51 percent of the network’s hash rate. As such, the quantum computer would be able to create and validate blocks on its own, erasing all of the trust users now Bitcoin Post-Quantum is a bit different than Bitcoin. Instead of multiple addresses, the best practice is to reuse a single address. In contrast with Bitcoin the address can be used a limited number of times (from a thousand to a million, depending on the chosen height of the Merkle tree). That includes the 1 million bitcoins mined by Bitcoin’s pseudonymous inventor, Satoshi Nakamoto—if those aren’t migrated to a new, quantum-resistant wallet, they’re treasure for the first

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Quantum Computing The Biggest Threat to Bitcoin?? (Must Watch)

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