Amazon.com: 60 GH/s ASIC Bitcoin Miner - Single: Computers

Selling two Butterfly Labs 60 GH/s ASIC Bitcoin Miner located in Copenhagen

Selling two Butterfly Labs 60 GH/s ASIC Bitcoin Miner located in Copenhagen submitted by IdolfHatler to BitcoinDK [link] [comments]

[WTS] 1 60 GH/s and 4 30 GH/s Bitcoin Miner ASIC pre-order for sale!!!

Currently been waiting for a while for the product to ship from BFL, It`s taking a bit longer then expected. Need to be rid of it by this week, Price is negotiable. Pm if interested. 1 30GH/s SOLD P.S ONLY ACCEPTING BTC.
submitted by wmatt to BitMarket [link] [comments]

Butterfly Labs BFL 60 GH/s Single SC ASIC Bitcoin Miner is for sale on cryptothrift.com for Bitcoin and Litecoin https://cryptothrift.com/auctions/crypto-mining-asic/butterfly-labs-bfl-60-ghs-single-sc-asic-bitcoin-miner/

Butterfly Labs BFL 60 GH/s Single SC ASIC Bitcoin Miner is for sale on cryptothrift.com for Bitcoin and Litecoin https://cryptothrift.com/auctions/crypto-mining-asic/butterfly-labs-bfl-60-ghs-single-sc-asic-bitcoin-mine submitted by duetschpire to cryptothrift [link] [comments]

With the pretty awesome rise of almost all crypto currencies, it's time to restart our machines and mine the most profitable coin today 30.01.2020!!!

So let's talk about the GPUs to start with, the ranking has radically changed and even those that were running at a loss have become profitable again The top 10 chart:
1.NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti 4.60 Mh/s 220W $1.35 $0.55 Zcoin(XZC) MTP Algo
2.NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 4.00 Mh/s 190W $1.17 $0.48 Zcoin(XZC) MTP
3.AMD Radeon VII 78.00 Mh/s 230W $1.22 $0.39 EthereumClassic(ETC) Ethash Algo
4.NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 3.60 Mh/s 190W $1.05 $0.37 Zcoin(XZC) MTP
5.AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT 51.50 Mh/s 140W $0.81 $0.30 EthereumClassic(ETC) Ethash
6.NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 2.60 Mh/s 130W $0.76 $0.29 Zcoin(XZC)MTP
7.NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 2.80 Mh/s 150W $0.82 $0.28 Zcoin(XZC) MTP
8.NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 2.80 Mh/s 150W $0.82 $0.28 Zcoin(XZC) MTP
9.NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 Ti 2.50 Mh/s 130W $0.73 $0.26 Zcoin(XZC) MTP
10.NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 2.00 Mh/s 100W $0.59 $0.22 Zcoin(XZC)
Now let's go to the asic Top 10:
  1. Innosilicon A10 ETHMaster 500.00 Mh/s 750W Ethash $5.13 EthereumClassic(ETC) Ethash
  2. Bitmain Antminer Z11 135.00 kh/s 1418W Equihash $3.45 Pirate(ARRR)
  3. BlackMiner F1+ 22.00 Gh/s 860W Eaglesong $3.23 Nervos(CKB) FPGAminer
4.Bitmain Antminer B7 96.00 kh/s 528W Tensority $1.87
5.Bitmain Antminer S17+ 73.00 Th/s 2920W SHA-256 $1.67 BitcoinSV(BSV)
6.StrongU STU-U6 420.00 Gh/s 2100W X11 $1.52 Dash(DASH)
  1. Bitmain Antminer S17 Pro 56 Th/s 2212W SHA-256 $1.46 BitcoinSV(BSV)
  2. Bitmain Antminer S17 59.00 Th/s 2385W SHA-256 $1.34 BitcoinSV(BSV)
  3. Innosilicon A9 ZMaster 50.00 kh/s 620W Equihash $1.08 Pirate(ARRR)
  4. FusionSilicon X7 262.00 Gh/s 1300W X11 $1.03 Dash(DASH)
Dont forget you can find around new Firmware for example for Z9/Z11 Efudd Firmware,and Hive OS firmwares which can Overclock S9/S15/S17 or Underclock (if your electriciy fee are too expensive), for example my S17 Pro I switched to new firmware (Hive OS) to 36Th/s with 900 Watts power gives me a 2.90 usd/day profit without electricity of course, for Z11 Overclocking without changing PSU from 135 to 150-160Ko/sol.
I calculated everything on the basis of 0.15 cens Kw / h.
Brand New Miner coming out:
ASICminer Zeon Turbo 400,000 Sol/s Equihash
Most Profitable Miner in the World. ASICminer Daily Revenue: $27 $16 (less 0.15 Kw/h fee) ASICminer Power Consumption: 2500W
asicminer dot co/shop (Factory)
submitted by pushingworld77 to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

A 14-year-old's experience with Bitcoin

First-time poster here, don’t bully me, apologies for the potentially atrocious formatting :) TL;DR at the end
So in the wake of Bitcoin’s explosive rise in value and media attention, I’ve been encouraged by others to share my experience over the past few years as a miner. Here's my story (it's kinda long, you've been warned)

Humble Beginnings

It all started almost three years ago in the beginning of 2015 when Bitcoin flew under my radar. Looking into it, I admittedly wasn’t drawn in because of the decentralisation or the anonymous payments, I was hooked on the idea that anyone could get their hands on some just by running a program and leaving it to do its own thing. I know, how shallow of me. But the idea of making even a bit of money without ‘any work’ was convincing enough for 11-year-old me to do more digging into the matter.
To my disappointment, I soon found out that the era of mining Bitcoins with a PC’s CPU or GPU was long obsolete and instead it was all ASICs at that point.
So that summer, for my twelfth birthday, I got a little ASIC machine for €60, an Antminer U3. This little thing took up less space than a graphics card but could mine at 60 GH/s. Because, at the time, I didn’t have a controller device that could be kept up and running all day long so it could run the program that mined Bitcoin using the U3, I went ahead and got a Raspberry Pi. After setting up the Pi and installing all the necessary stuff (took an awfully long time), I connected it to AntPool and plugged the U3 in. Two days past and the mining pool sent the first Bitcoin I ever received to my wallet (I was using Blockchain.info). It was just 30 cents worth of BTC but I felt a bit of a rush because I was earning a bit of money through this completely new thing and the idea of that was thrilling.
Let’s back up for a second. I just used the term ‘earning’ as if I was profiting, and naive me 2 years ago was no different. In reality, I was at first oblivious to the fact that I was most likely LOSING money overall because of how much energy that little sucker was taking in. But, I was comforted thinking that using that machine was just a practical way of learning about this modern currency and that the loss of several cents’ worth of energy was acceptable in the name of education and learning.
Fast forward ten months to the wonderful summer of 2016. I had recently turned 13 and the Antminer U3 had been running on and off throughout. Various pauses and breaks in mining would be observed, as I had to manually get everything up and running after frequent breaks in the Internet connection. You’d expect my newly-turned-teenage brain to lose interest in Bitcoin as it does with many other gimmicks, but – even surprising myself – I miraculously didn’t. Good thing I maintained interest thinking about it now, not so good at the time for my parents. Why do I say this? I felt like it was time to get a little upgrade in my hardware.

Getting an upgrade

Days passed with me comparing every ASIC miner I could at that price point. It was then I set my eyes upon the Antminer S7 (same folks who did my U3, nice). I had put it up against a plethora of other miners and I figured the S7 was my best bet; the thing costs only about 10 times that of my U3 but could run at 4.73 TH/s, almost 80 times as powerful. The only problem being its power consumption was at 1300 watts, which would put a massive dent in the electricity bill and eliminate any profit I would make. Fortunately, I had a secret weapon up my sleeve – or rather my mum did. She had rented out an office outside our apartment where she would keep files and paperwork. The office’s electricity bill was a flat rate as far as I’m aware and it ended up being my saving grace because it virtually got rid of the “oh no I’m actually going to be losing money because of how much electricity I’m eating up” factor, making this whole hardware upgrade viable.
After convincing my parents, they finally agreed to shell out the requested amount, with the initial investment being paid back with time. I went to a local Bitcoin vendor and purchased 1 BTC for about $665 in cash (sigh yes, I know. $665 dollars). Shortly after, I used about 0.9 BTC to purchase the Antminer S7 and a 1600W power supply for a grand total of $600. The products would be made and shipped from China so I was definitely in for a wait.
A month passes and the package arrives at last. I connected all the wires from the power supply into the S7 and – with great anticipation – I plugged it into the wall to start its first ever run. And what do you know? An extremely loud and high-pitched whirring sound blasted out from the fans on both the power supply as well as the S7. After killing the thing, I questioned my choices. I couldn’t dare put that thing anywhere near my mum’s office in the event it drive everyone in the building absolutely nuts. I was at a loss. However, I soon recovered from my temporarily debilitated state and got working on a solution.
The first idea that came to my mind: change the fans. The stocks fans were by Evercool and spun at around 3000 RPM. The power supply used a small, robust fan that looked like a cube that must’ve spun at extremely high speeds judging by how high the sound it produced was. I got my parents to give me some more funding so I could acquire the replacement fans and I did. Bust. After installation and testing, none of the fans would work. I managed to configure the S7 to connect to my Antpool account and the machine would manage mining for several minutes running at peak performance but ultimately be automatically cut off because of how hot the machine was getting (I’m talking about 80 degrees Celsius kinda hot in that thing). The fans got refunded and I was back to the drawing board.
After combing through some forum posts and videos, I came across this video and a forum post in which people have their mining rigs placed inside a ventilated, muffled cabinet. Undertaking a project like this would be time-consuming and risky but I had no better ideas so I decided to go through with the idea anyway.
Firstly, I sought out a cabinet with suitable dimensions. I managed to get just what I needed at a second-hand IKEA shop. Great. Secondly, I went ahead and acquired some sound-absorbing acoustic foam from a local provider. Fantastic. Finally I had to get a ventilation system going within the cabinet, otherwise, all the hot air would roast the machine alive in there in a bloody mess. With the help of my dad, we found a pair cabinet fans on the Internet that were close to silent but could circulate the air well enough.
Eventually, all the materials came and, with the help of my parents, put everything together. The process took quite long time and we had a couple hiccups along the way, but we got it done and it came out pretty nice.
The moment of truth came and, to my relief, it ran so much quieter than without the cabinet. It was nowhere near silent but it reduced the noise a great deal. Soon after, I got the thing into the office and set everything up from there. Unfortunately, I was forced to underclock it because you could still hear the machine’s whining from outside the thin office door. Gunning the hashrate down about 25% to 3.7TH/s, I could lower the fan speed without risking the machine burning up. Sure, I wasn’t getting the full potential of the machine but I didn’t complain because electricity was not an issue there and it was still a whole lot better than my U3. With it up and running, I could leave it there, periodically checking to see if it was mining on Antpool.

The aftermath

In the months that followed, I was getting a solid $2.5 worth of BTC on daily basis. Half a year later, May of 2017, I had accumulated a satisfactory $600. I thought, “At this rate, I’d be able to pay my parents’ investment back in a few months” (the total investment came close to $900). Bitcoin had risen to over $1500 so I was already over the moon at that point because of how well everything was going. Little did I know…
I hit 0.5 BTC midway through September this year. The price of BTC had dropped after a sudden rise to $5000, but I couldn’t have asked for more. Although I possessed only half the amount of BTC I paid for the machine, its value was over twice that of the initial investment. I thought BTC would level off at around $4000 but nope.
In the month of October, the price skyrocketed. Since September, I had only mined 0.017 BTC but the value was already over $3000. It was just a matter of selling it, but I decided to hodl. Good thing I did.
As of November 5, I have approximately 0.52 BTC mined in total from my S7, valued at $4000. If I were to sell it right now, I’d have a profit of over $3100. And as for my miner, it’s churning out 0.0006 BTC daily, sounds like nothing but it’s still the equivalent of $5 today and I couldn’t be happier, at least with the miner and Bitcoin.
You remember that $665 for 1 BTC that I mentioned earlier? In hindsight, it would’ve been such a better idea to just keep that one Bitcoin and not do anything with it until today (in the interest of making much more money), as I’d theoretically have upwards of $7000. The idea of that still haunts me sometimes if I dwell on it too long but knowing that I’m in possession of an already hefty amount, the pain of it had numbed slightly. It’s not all doom and gloom for me from the exponential increase in Bitcoin’s value, however. Those first $0.3 payments from my humble little U3 all those years ago now are now the equivalent of over $6 today!
Bitcoin and everything it encompasses has been and still is a journey of discovery and an adventure. Looking back, starting with a modest €60 Antminer U3 to having a sum of Bitcoin equivalent to two extremely high-end gaming rigs (first thing I could think of as a comparison, sorry) has been something I can’t really describe. Through the course of the past few years, I’ve learned more about technology, I’ve unexpectedly gotten insight into economics and business and – of course – I’ve made a lot of money (if I decide to stop hodling that is).
Also, props to my parents for keeping an open mind throughout, I know some parents would be horrified at their kids being involved in something that has been used in some less-than-savoury ways and it's great knowing mine have been supportive all the way.
TL;DR got into Bitcoin mining 3 years ago at age 11 with an Antminer U3 that ran at 60 GH/s, got an Antminer S7 (4.73TH/s) and built a sound-muffling, ventilated cabinet for it. Am sat here today with $3000 profit if I decide to sell right now.
submitted by xx_riptide_xx to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

howmanyconfs.com - How does the security of different Proof-of-Work blockchains compare to Bitcoin?

https://howmanyconfs.com
Original post in Bitcoin here: https://np.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/biokgy/howmanyconfscom_how_does_the_security_of/

https://github.com/lukechilds/howmanyconfs.com/raw/mastescreenshot.png

How are these values calculated?

It's easy to compare blockchain hashrates when the Proof-of-Work algorithm is the same. For example if Bitcoin has a hashrate of SHA-256 @ 40 PH/s and Bitcoin Cash has a hashrate of SHA-256 @ 2 PH/s, it's easy to see that for a given period of time the Bitcoin blockchain will have 20x (40/2) the amount of work securing it than the Bitcoin Cash blockchain. Or to say that differently, you need to wait for 20x more Bitcoin Cash confirmations before an equivalent amount of work has been done compared to the Bitcoin blockchain. So 6 Bitcoin confirmations would be roughly equivalent to 120 Bitcoin Cash confirmations in the amount of work done.
However if the Proof-of-Work algorithms are different, how can we compare the hashrate? If we're comparing Bitcoin (SHA-256 @ 40 PH/s) against Litecoin (Scrypt @ 300 TH/s), the hashes aren't equal, one round of SHA-256 is not equivalent to one round of Scrypt.
What we really want to know is how much energy is being consumed to provide the current hash rate. Literal energy, as in joules or kilowatt hours. It would be great if we had a universal metric across blockchains like kWh/s to measure immutability.
However that's fairly hard to calculate, we need to know the average power consumption of the average device used to mine. For GPU/CPU mined Proof-of-Work algorithms this varies greatly. For ASIC mined Proof-of-Work algorithms it varies less, however it's likely that ASIC manufacturers are mining with next generation hardware long before the public is made aware of them, which we can't account for.
There's no automated way to get this data and no reliable data source to scrape it from. We'd need to manually research all mining hardware and collate the data ourself. And as soon as newer mining hardware comes out our results will be outdated.
Is there a simpler way to get an estimated amount of work per blockchain in a single metric we can use for comparisons?
Yeah, there is, we can use NiceHash prices to estimate the cost in $ to secure a blockchain for a given timeframe. This is directly comparable across blockchains and should be directly proportionate to kWh/s, because after all, the energy needs to be paid for in $.
How can we estimate this?
Now we have an estimated total Proof-of-Work metric measured in dollars per second ($/s).
The $/s metric may not be that accurate. Miners will mark up the cost when reselling on NiceHash and we're making the assumption that NiceHash supply is infinite. You can't actually rent 100% of Bitcoin's hashpower from NiceHash, there isn't enough supply.
However that's not really an issue for this metric, we aren't trying to calculate the theoretical cost to rent an additional 100% of the hashrate, we're trying to get a figure that allows us to compare the cost of the current total hashrate accross blockchains. Even if the exact $ value we end up with is not that accurate, it should still be proportionate to kWh/s. This means it's still an accurate metric to compare the difference in work done over a given amount of time between blockchains.
So how do we compare these values between blockchains?
Once we've done the above calculations and got a $/s cost for each blockchain, we just need to factor in the average block time and calculate the total $ cost for a given number of confirmations. Then see how much time is required on the other blockchain at it's $/s value to equal the total cost.
So to calculate how many Litecoin confirmations are equivalent to 6 Bitcoin confirmations we would do:
Therefore we can say that 240 Litecoin confirmations are roughly equal to 6 Bitcoin confirmations in total amount of work done.

Notes

$/s doesn't mean what it sounds like it means.

The $/s values should not be taken as literal costs.
For example:
This is does not mean you could do a 51% attack on Bitcoin and roll back 6 blocks for a cost of $360,000. An attack like that would be much more expensive.
The $/s value is a metric to compare the amount of work at the current hashrate between blockchains. It is not the same as the cost to add hashrate to the network.
When adding hashrate to a network the cost will not scale linearly with hashrate. It will jump suddenly at certain intervals.
For example, once you've used up the available hashrate on NiceHash you need to add the costs of purchasing ASICs, then once you've bought all the ASICs in the world, you'd need to add the costs of fabricating your own chips to keep increasing hashrate.

These metrics are measuring "work done", not security.

More "work done" doesn't necessarily mean "more security".
For example take the following two blockchains:
Bitcoin Cash has a higher $/s value than Zcash so we can deduce it has more "work done" over a given timeframe than Zcash. More kWh/s are required to secure it's blockchain. However does that really mean it's safer?
Zcash is the dominant blockchain for it's Proof-of-Work algorithm (Equihash). Whereas Bitcoin Cash isn't, it uses the same algorithm as Bitcoin. In fact just 5% of Bitcoin's hashrate is equivalent to all of Bitcoin Cash's hashrate.
This means the cost of a 51% attack against Bitcoin Cash could actually be much lower than a 51% attack against Zcash, even though you need to aquire more kWh/s of work, the cost to aquire those kWh/s will likely be lower.
To attack Bitcoin Cash you don't need to acquire any hardware, you just need to convince 5% of the Bitcoin hashrate to lend their SHA-256 hashpower to you.
To attack Zcash, you would likely need to fabricate your own Equihash ASICs, as almost all the Equihash mining hardware in the world is already securing Zcash.

Accurately calculating security is much more complicated.

These metrics give a good estimated value to compare the hashrate accross different Proof-of-Work blockchains.
However to calculate if a payment can be considered "finalised" involves many more variables.
You should factor in:
If the cryptocurrency doesn't dominate the Proof-of-Work it can be attacked more cheaply.
If the market cap or trading volume is really low, an attacker may crash the price of the currency before they can successfully double spend it and make a profit. Although that's more relevant in the context of exchanges rather than individuals accepting payments.
If the value of the transaction is low enough, it may cost more to double spend than an attacker would profit from the double spend.
Ultimately, once the cost of a double spend becomes higher than an attacker can expect to profit from the double spend, that is when a payment can probably be considered "finalised".
submitted by dyslexiccoder to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Decred Journal – September 2018

Note: you can read this on GitHub (link), Medium (link) or old Reddit (link).

Development

Final version 1.3.0 of the core software was released bringing all the enhancements reported last month to the rest of the community. The groundwork for SPV (simplified payment verification) is complete, another reduction of fees is being deployed, and performance stepped up once again with a 50% reduction in startup time, 20% increased sync speed and more than 3x faster peer delivery of block headers (a key update for SPV). Decrediton's integrations of SPV and Politeia are open for testing by experienced users. Read the full release notes and get the downloads on GitHub. As always, don't forget to verify signatures.
dcrd: completed several steps towards multipeer downloads, improved introduction to the software in the main README, continued porting cleanups and refactoring from upstream btcd.
Currently in review are initial release of smart fee estimator and a change to UTXO set semantics. The latter is a large and important change that provides simpler handling, and resolves various issues with the previous approach. A lot of testing and careful review is needed so help is welcome.
Educational series for new Decred developers by @matheusd added two episodes: 02 Simnet Setup shows how to automate simnet management with tmux and 03 Miner Reward Invalidation explains block validity rules.
Finally, a pull request template with a list of checks was added to help guide the contributors to dcrd.
dcrwallet: bugfixes and RPC improvements to support desktop and mobile wallets.
Developers are welcome to comment on this idea to derive stakepool keys from the HD wallet seed. This would eliminate the need to backup and restore redeem scripts, thus greatly improving wallet UX. (missed in July issue)
Decrediton: bugfixes, refactoring to make the sync process more robust, new loading animations, design polishing.
Politeia: multiple improvements to the CLI client (security conscious users with more funds at risk might prefer CLI) and security hardening. A feature to deprecate or timeout proposals was identified as necessary for initial release and the work started. A privacy enhancement to not leak metadata of ticket holders was merged.
Android: update from @collins: "Second test release for dcrandroid is out. Major bugs have been fixed since last test. Latest code from SPV sync has been integrated. Once again, bug reports are welcome and issues can be opened on GitHub". Ask in #dev room for the APK to join testing.
A new security page was added that allows one to validate addresses and to sign/verify messages, similar to Decrediton's Security Center. Work on translations is beginning.
Overall the app is quite stable and accepting more testers. Next milestone is getting the test app on the app store.
iOS: the app started accepting testers last week. @macsleven: "the test version of Decred Wallet for iOS is available, we have a link for installing the app but the builds currently require your UDID. Contact either @macsleven or @raedah with your UDID if you would like to help test.".
Nearest goal is to make the app crash free.
Both mobile apps received new design themes.
dcrdata: v3.0 was released for mainnet! Highlights: charts, "merged debits" view, agendas page, Insight API support, side chain tracking, Go 1.11 support with module builds, numerous backend improvements. Full release notes here. This release featured 9 contributors and development lead @chappjc noted: "This collaboration with @raedahgroup on our own block explorer and web API for @decredproject has been super productive.".
Up next is supporting dynamic page widths site wide and deploying new visual blocks home page.
Trezor: proof of concept implementation for Trezor Model T firmware is in the works (previous work was for Model One).
Ticket splitting: updated to use Go modules and added simnet support, several fixes.
docs: beginner's guide overhaul, multiple fixes and cleanups.
decred.org: added 3rd party wallets, removed inactive PoW pools and removed web wallet.
@Richard-Red is building a curated list of Decred-related GitHub repositories.
Welcome to new people contributing for the first time: @klebe, @s_ben, @victorguedes, and PrimeDominus!
Dev activity stats for September: 219 active PRs, 197 commits, 28.7k added and 18.8k deleted lines spread across 6 repositories. Contributions came from 4-10 developers per repository. (chart)

Network

Hashrate: started and ended the month around 75 PH/s, hitting a low of 60.5 and a new high of 110 PH/s. BeePool is again the leader with their share varying between 23-54%, followed by F2Pool 13-30%, Coinmine 4-6% and Luxor 3-5%. As in previous months, there were multiple spikes of unidentified hashrate.
Staking: 30-day average ticket price is 98 DCR (+2.4). The price varied between 95.7 and 101.9 DCR. Locked DCR amount was 3.86-3.96 million DCR, or 45.7-46.5% of the supply.
Nodes: there are 201 public listening nodes and 325 normal nodes per dcred.eu. Version distribution: 5% are v1.4.0(pre) dev builds (+3%), 30% on v1.3.0 (+25%), 42% on v1.2.0 (-20%), 15% on v1.1.2 (-7%), 6% on v1.1.0. More than 76% of nodes run v1.2.0 and higher and therefore support client filters. Data as of Oct 1.

ASICs

Obelisk posted two updates on their mailing list. 70% of Batch 1 units are shipped, an extensive user guide is available, Obelisk Scanner application was released that allows one to automatically update firmware. First firmware update was released and bumped SC1 hashrate by 10-20%, added new pools and fixed multiple bugs. Next update will focus on DCR1. It is worth a special mention that the firmware source code is now open! Let us hope more manufacturers will follow this example.
A few details about Whatsminer surfaced this month. The manufacturer is MicroBT, also known as Bitwei and commonly misspelled as Bitewei. Pangolinminer is a reseller, and the model name is Whatsminer D1.
Bitmain has finally entered Decred ASIC space with their Antminer DR3. Hash rate is 7.8 TH/s while pulling 1410 W, at the price of $673. These specs mean it has the best GH/W and GH/USD of currently sold miners until the Whatsminer or others come out, although its GH/USD of 11.6 already competes with Whatsminer's 10.5. Discussed on Reddit and bitcointalk, unboxing video here.

Integrations

Meet our 17th voting service provider: decredvoting.com. It is operated by @david, has 2% fee and supports ticket splitting. Reddit thread is here.
For a historical note, the first VSP to support ticket splitting was decredbrasil.com:
@matheusd started tests on testnet several months ago. I contacted him so we could integrate with the pool in June this year. We set up the machine in July and bought the first split ticket on mainnet, using the decredbrasil pool, on July 19. It was voted on July 30. After this first vote on mainnet, we opened the tests to selected users (with more technical background) on the pool. In August we opened the tests to everyone, and would call people who want to join to the #ticket_splitting channel, or to our own Slack (in Portuguese, so mostly Brazilian users). We have 28 split tickets already voted, and 16 are live. So little more than 40 split tickets total were bought on decredbrasil pool. (@girino in #pos-voting)
KuCoin exchange listed DCBTC and DCETH pairs. To celebrate their anniversary they had a 99% trading fees discount on DCR pairs for 2 weeks.
Three more wallets integrated Decred in September:
ChangeNow announced Decred addition to their Android app that allows accountless swaps between 150+ assets.
Coinbase launched informational asset pages for top 50 coins by market cap, including Decred. First the pages started showing in the Coinbase app for a small group of testers, and later the web price dashboard went live.

Adoption

The birth of a Brazilian girl was registered on the Decred blockchain using OriginalMy, a blockchain proof of authenticity services provider. Read the full story in Portuguese and in English.

Marketing

Advertising report for September is ready. Next month the graphics for all the ads will be changing.
Marketing might seem quiet right now, but a ton is actually going on behind the scenes to put the right foundation in place for the future. Discovery data are being analyzed to generate a positioning strategy, as well as a messaging hierarchy that can guide how to talk about Decred. This will all be agreed upon via consensus of the community in the work channels, and materials will be distributed.
Next, work is being done to identify the right PR partner to help with media relations, media training, and coordination at events. While all of this is coming up to speed, we believe the website needs a refresher reflecting the soon to be agreed upon messaging, plus a more intuitive architecture to make it easier to navigate. (@Dustorf)

Events

Attended:
Upcoming:
We'll begin shortly reviewing conferences and events planned for the first half of 2019. Highlights are sure to include The North American Bitcoin Conference in Miami (Jan 16-18) and Consensus in NYC (May 14-16). If you have suggestions of events or conferences Decred should attend, please share them in #event_planning. In 2019, we would like to expand our presence in Europe, Asia, and South America, and we're looking for community members to help identify and staff those events. (@Dustorf)

Media

August issue of Decred Journal was translated to Russian. Many thanks to @DZ!
Rency cryptocurrency ratings published a report on Decred and incorporated a lot of feedback from the community on Reddit.
September issue of Chinese CCID ratings was published (snapshot), Decred is still at the bottom.
Videos:
Featured articles:
Articles:

Community Discussions

Community stats:
Comm systems news: Several work channels were migrated to Matrix, #writers_room is finally bridged.
Highlights:
Twitter: why decentralized governance and funding are necessary for network survival and the power of controlling the narrative; learning about governance more broadly by watching its evolution in cryptocurrency space, importance of community consensus and communications infrastructure.
Reddit: yet another strong pitch by @solar; question about buyer protections; dcrtime internals; a proposal to sponsor hoodies in the University of Cape Town; Lightning Network support for altcoins.
Chats: skills to operate a stakepool; voting details: 2 of 3 votes can approve a block, what votes really approve are regular tx, etc; scriptless script atomic swaps using Schnorr adaptor signatures; dev dashboard, choosing work, people do best when working on what interests them most; opportunities for governments and enterprise for anchoring legal data to blockchain; terminology: DAO vs DAE; human-friendly payments, sharing xpub vs payment protocols; funding btcsuite development; Politeia vote types: approval vote, sentiment vote and a defund vote, also linking proposals and financial statements; algo trading and programming languages (yes, on #trading!); alternative implementation, C/C++/Go/Rust; HFTs, algo trading, fake volume and slippage; offline wallets, usb/write-only media/optical scanners vs auditing traffic between dcrd and dcrwallet; Proof of Activity did not inspire Decred but spurred Decred to get moving, Wikipedia page hurdles; how stakeholders could veto blocks; how many votes are needed to approve a proposal; why Decrediton uses Electron; CVE-2018-17144 and over-dependence on single Bitcoin implementation, btcsuite, fuzz testing; tracking proposal progress after voting and funding; why the wallet does not store the seed at all; power connectors, electricity, wiring and fire safety; reasonable spendings from project fund; ways to measure sync progress better than block height; using Politeia without email address; concurrency in Go, locks vs channels.
#support is not often mentioned, but it must be noted that every day on this channel people get high quality support. (@bee: To my surprise, even those poor souls running Windows 10. My greatest respect to the support team!)

Markets

In September DCR was trading in the range of USD 34-45 / BTC 0.0054-0.0063. On Sep 6, DCR revisited the bottom of USD 34 / BTC 0.0054 when BTC quickly dropped from USD 7,300 to 6,400. On Sep 14, a small price rise coincided with both the start of KuCoin trading and hashrate spike to 104 PH/s. Looking at coinmarketcap charts, the trading volume is a bit lower than in July and August.
As of Oct 4, Decred is #18 by the number of daily transactions with 3,200 tx, and #9 by the USD value of daily issuance with $230k. (source: onchainfx)
Interesting observation by @ImacallyouJawdy: while we sit at 2018 price lows the amount locked in tickets is testing 2018 high.

Relevant External

ASIC for Lyra2REv2 was spotted on the web. Vertcoin team is preparing a new PoW algorithm. This would be the 3rd fork after two previous forks to change the algorithm in 2014 and 2015.
A report titled The Positive Externalities of Bitcoin Mining discusses the benefits of PoW mining that are often overlooked by the critics of its energy use.
A Brief Study of Cryptonetwork Forks by Alex Evans of Placeholder studies the behavior of users, developers and miners after the fork, and makes the cases that it is hard for child chains to attract users and developers from their parent chains.
New research on private atomic swaps: the paper "Anonymous Atomic Swaps Using Homomorphic Hashing" attempts to break the public link between two transactions. (bitcointalk, decred)
On Sep 18 Poloniex announced delisting of 8 more assets. That day they took a 12-80% dive showing their dependence on this one exchange.
Circle introduced USDC markets on Poloniex: "USDC is a fully collateralized US dollar stablecoin using the ERC-20 standard that provides detailed financial and operational transparency, operates within the regulated framework of US money transmission laws, and is reinforced by established banking partners and auditors.".
Coinbase announced new asset listing process and is accepting submissions on their listing portal. (decred)
The New York State Office of the Attorney General posted a study of 13 exchanges that contains many insights.
A critical vulnerability was discovered and fixed in Bitcoin Core. Few days later a full disclosure was posted revealing the severity of the bug. In a bitcointalk thread btcd was called 'amateur' despite not being vulnerable, and some Core developers voiced their concerns about multiple implementations. The Bitcoin Unlimited developer who found the bug shared his perspective in a blog post. Decred's vision so far is that more full node implementations is a strength, just like for any Internet protocol.

About This Issue

This is the 6th issue of Decred Journal. It is mirrored on GitHub, Medium and Reddit. Past issues are available here.
Most information from third parties is relayed directly from source after a minimal sanity check. The authors of Decred Journal have no ability to verify all claims. Please beware of scams and do your own research.
Feedback is appreciated: please comment on Reddit, GitHub or #writers_room on Matrix or Slack.
Contributions are also welcome: some areas are adding content, pre-release review or translations to other languages.
Credits (Slack names, alphabetical order): bee, Dustorf, jz, Haon, oregonisaac, raedah and Richard-Red.
submitted by jet_user to decred [link] [comments]

DD on Crypto. Just kidding Allin AMD

Alright, I keep seeing you fucks talk about how "Bitcoin is going to make Nvidia/AMD go to the moon". I'm going to walk all you fucks through bitcoin, crypto currencies, and how they effect the GPU market.
What is Bitcoin?
Bitcoin is a decentralized ledger. That's pretty much it. A set number of bitcoin is generated per block, and each block is solved when a resulting hash is found for the corresponding proof of work. The difficulty is adjusted periodically based on a formula, meaning that as hash rate rises and falls, the number of bitcoins produced per day is roughly the same.
What does Bitcoin have to do with AMD and Nvidia?
Fucking nothing. Bitcoin is mined on proprietary hardware called Application-specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs). Neither AMD or Nvidia produce these.
Why does everyone keep talking about Bitcoin and AMD then?
Because they're fucking retarded and you're listening to retards. Bitcoin runs on the SHA-256 Hashing Function which people have custom hardware for. The Crypto driving GPU sales is ETHEREUM, NOT BITCOIN
What the fuck is Ethereum then?
Don't worry about it. It's for smug assholes who are too edgy for Bitcoin. All you need to know is it runs on a different Hashing function than Bitcoin, so if you weren't a retard you'd probably realize that the proprietary hardware I talked about earlier won't work with it. Currently Ethereum is being mined the same way Bitcoin was when it first started; on GPUs.
When are you going to tell me what to buy
Shut the fuck up, learn something or kill your self.
How many GPUs are being used to mine currently?
Currently the Ethereum Hash Rate is 73,000 GH/s. For upcoming earnings, we should instead look at the period from April to June. April 1st shows a network hash rate of 16,500 GH/s, and June 31st shows 59,200 GH/s, meaning the network hash rate increased by 42,700 GH/s for this upcoming earnings report quarter.
I've linked a decent benchmark for GPU hashrate . You should notice that all of these are quoted in MH/s, versus the Network reporting in GH/s; there are ALOT of fucking GPUs running on the network. A top of the line 1080 puts out about 20-25 MH/s, a good Radeon card does about 30. As a rough estimate, lets assume that the average card mining Ethereum currently produces about 25 MH/s. 42,700GH/s / 25MH/s means that there are 1.7 MILLION more GPUs currently mining ethereum than there were at the beginning of Q1. Based on my personal observations being involved in this, AMD is actually taking a majority market share of the sold cards just due to their superior performance compared to Nvidia's 1080s, and I'd estimate that About 50-60% of the cards currently mining Ethereum are AMD Radeons.
What does this all mean?
AMD are selling their highest margin video cards faster than they can produce them, and at ~250$ a pop with 50%-60% market capture AMD will have sold roughly 200-300 million dollars more in video cards than they did last quarter. AMD quarterly revenue last reported was just under 1 Billion. This is a 20-30% increase in revenue from last quarter, where Ethereum Hash Rate only increased by about 10,000GH/s. Even assuming a modest 30% margin for their video cards, AMD will still have almost 60 million in unexpected earnings this quarter due to crypto mining, which translates to about .06-.1 per share in earnings.
tl;dr
Ethereum will make AMD beat revenue by 20-30%. BUY AMD YOU CUCKS.
submitted by Askmeaboutmyautism to wallstreetbets [link] [comments]

2 Reasons Why Dogecoin Should Adapt Vertcoin's Features

Dogecoin should adapt both Scrypt-n as it's proof of work, and Kimotos Gravity Well as the method for adjusting difficulty.
Let me start with Kimitos Gravity Well. This is an algorithm used for adjusting the network difficulty. It adjusts the difficulty slightly every block rather than every set period, so that profit switching pools can not take advantage of it. It smooths out difficulty adjustments too.
This is needed because Dogecoin is about to be exploited by profit switching pools. Right now there's about 50 GH/s(over half of the network!) of profit switching pools mining Doge. When the block reward is halved in less than a week, we're going to see a ton of coin hopping between Litecoin and Dogecoin by these pools. This threatens the network, as the hashrate distribution and difficulty would become incredibly unstable. With this change, the difficulty would only fluctuate by about 5-10% throughout the day even with profit switching pools, unlike the 50%+ it will likely see using the current method.
The second thing is adaptive scrypt-n. Scrypt-n is a proof of work algorithm that makes ASICs nearly impossible to create. It adjusts the memory requirement on a block schedule, so that ASICs would likely never be made for it. ASICs are dedicated devices for mining that are much more power efficient than GPUs, and eventually will become more cost efficient. Dogecoin uses plain scrypt, and ASICs for it are already being developed. Eventually once these devices become more advanced, they will make gpu mining near impossible, and you will need an ASIC to profit or even make a moderate amount of Doge.
ASICs will make acquiring Dogecoin hard for newcomers. Looking at Bitcoin, many ASIC companies like BFL end up as scams, and those that aren't charge ridiculous prices for units that won't even make ROI. Mining with a gpu will get you nothing. I don't want this to happen to Dogecoin, as it is a fun cryptocurrency that is designed for the people. Eventually ASIC companies may withhold their technologies and use it for themselves, and as a result could control too much of the network. Look at Bitcoin, where KNC miner plans to create a 10 Megawatt mining farm in Sweden that is estimated to control 60-70% of the network.
Not just do ASICs ruin the fun of the coin by making it impossible for newcomers to easily mine a few doge, but it also ruins the security of the coin long term. I really hope we can convince the devs to implement scrypt-n, as I want Dogecoin to stay fun and secure. It sadly would require a hard fork, but it would be planned ahead of time. Better now than before Dogecoin grows larger, and before people with thousands of dollars invested into ASICs refuse to switch. Don't wait until ASICs become overpowered-it will be too late.
Vertcoin is a great coin from a technical standpoint, but it lacks the large and friendly community Dogecoin has behind it and also is deflationary, making it not as ideal as an internet currency that is intended to be shared a lot. I feel like Dogecoin could make great use of it's technology.
submitted by skilliard4 to dogecoin [link] [comments]

My concerns about SmartCash

Hello folks!
I have been doing a lot of reading about the SmartCash cryptocurrency recently. SmartCash claims to be a private cryptocurrency that also focuses on a community-centered model.
However, a lot of what I've found has concerned me.
But first - I'd like to invite anyone with an opposing point of view to share their opinions after reading this. I'm not in this to spread baseless accusations, I just want an educated conversation. Please do not downvote simply because you disagree; instead, read my post, make a comment and discuss the topic with me. I've sent PM's to several people who support SmartCash in order to let them make their opinions clear.
That said, let's go through this point by point - we'll start with the distribution.
From the official SmartCash website:
Traditional cryptocurrencies, like Bitcoin, reward only the miners while neglecting the other actors that play an active role in maintaining, developing and promoting the project. SmartCash is a community-centric cryptocurrency, where community and development comes first. 80% of the block reward has been allocated to fund SmartHive community proposals as well as the Hive Teams. 20% of the remaining block reward has been allocated to Mining (5%) and SmartRewards (15%).
In the name of staying unbiased, I am going to acknowledge my ideological beliefs about mining, as well as my own personal biases as a miner, that miners should receive 100% of the rewards for the work they did. With this out of the way, let's discuss the mathematics of SmartCash's block reward distribution.
80% goes to community projects, 15% goes to SmartRewards (staking equivalent, but not used for consensus), and 5% goes to the miners. In theory, this will lead to 95% less miners than normal, ensuring miners get paid roughly the same. In practice, this won't necessarily be true.
But the existence of fewer miners also presents many issues. There have been several 51% attacks against cryptocurrencies that give all block rewards to miners - Krypton in 2016, Feathercoin in 2013, and Dashcoin (a cryptonote fork DSH, not DASH) by MinerGate in April of 2017.
Chain consensus with SmartCash is determined entirely by proof of work, not proof of stake; therefore you do not need to own any coins in order to attack the network and achieve 51% hashrate.
In the case of a cryptocurrency that gives miners 5% of the block rewards, achieving 51% of nethash is quite easy, because fewer people will be mining. SmartCash's current network hashrate is 10 Th/s or 10 trillion hashes per second; a conservative estimate for a GTX 1080's hashrate is 1 Gh/s or 1 billion hashes per second. Therefore, the network is currently secured by the equivalent of 10,000 GTX 1080 GPUs.
Given that this GPU costs approximately $500, it would take about $5 million to conduct a 51% attack on the network. At nicehash prices of ~0.3 BTC/TH/S/Day, this would cost ~$60,000 per day, taking into account a necessary raise in the offered price to 'persuade' more people to switch to Keccak algo, as only 2TH/s is currently for sale on Nicehash.
Even worse, Keccak (Smartcash’s hashing algorithm) was specifically designed to be ASIC-friendly. From the official Keccak website:
Keccak, the winner of the SHA-3 competition, is blazing fast when implemented on dedicated (ASIC) or programmable (FPGA) hardware.
So if somebody ever modified a Keccak ASIC for mining, it would also be easy to conduct a 51% attack.
Let’s move on. Remember how they said that 80% of the block rewards go to a community fund? That address is here, and it controls 55% of the SmartCash in existence. This address is used to fund proposals that are voted on by the community. The problem is that the private key to this address is owned by the developers - and regardless of their past honesty, this system still requires trust in them. A trust-required system is directly contrary to the principles of cryptocurrency. The developers, despite your trust in them, could still sell some of those coins at any time.
Next up we'll discuss SmartCash's privacy. SmartCash uses the Zerocoin protocol for privacy, as it was forked from Zcoin. Zerocoin breaks the link between sender and receiver, but unlike Zerocash and ringCT, it does not hide the transaction amount. Furthermore, SmartCash's privacy is optional, and it is transparent by default. Transparency by default is bad for the following reasons:
(1) it reduces the anonymity set
(2) it makes private transactions inherently more suspicious
(3) it allows sender to harm the privacy of recipient
(4) it makes it impossible to hide your wealth
(5) it makes the currency non-fungible.
My last concern with SmartCash is the coin distribution. Currently, as shown on the SmartCash Rich List, the top 100 addresses control 98.42% of funds. This is a highly unbalanced situation, and it also means that the vast majority of SmartCash wealth is held by a small number of people. With Bitcoin, the top 100 addresses control roughly 32% of funds, which is not perfect, but certainly much better.
In summary, SmartCash is a great idea - a private, community-oriented cryptocurrency - but it is executed in a suboptimal manner.
I would be happy to hear your opinions on this, whether you agree or disagree.
-KnifeOfPi2
submitted by KnifeOfPi2 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

The Concept of Bitcoin

The Concept of Bitcoin
https://preview.redd.it/5r9soz2ltq421.jpg?width=268&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=6a89685f735b53ec1573eefe08c8646970de8124
What is Bitcoin?
Bitcoin is an experimental system of transfer and verification of property based on a network of peer to peer without any central authority.
The initial application and the main innovation of the Bitcoin network is a system of digital currency decentralized unit of account is bitcoin.
Bitcoin works with software and a protocol that allows participants to issue bitcoins and manage transactions in a collective and automatic way. As a free Protocol (open source), it also allows interoperability of software and services that use it. As a currency bitcoin is both a medium of payment and a store of value.
Bitcoin is designed to self-regulate. The limited inflation of the Bitcoin system is distributed homogeneously by computing the network power, and will be limited to 21 million divisible units up to the eighth decimal place. The functioning of the Exchange is secured by a general organization that everyone can examine, because everything is public: the basic protocols, cryptographic algorithms, programs making them operational, the data of accounts and discussions of the developers.
The possession of bitcoins is materialized by a sequence of numbers and letters that make up a virtual key allowing the expenditure of bitcoins associated with him on the registry. A person may hold several key compiled in a 'Bitcoin Wallet ', 'Keychain' web, software or hardware which allows access to the network in order to make transactions. Key to check the balance in bitcoins and public keys to receive payments. It contains also (often encrypted way) the private key associated with the public key. These private keys must remain secret, because their owner can spend bitcoins associated with them on the register. All support (keyrings) agrees to maintain the sequence of symbols constituting your keychain: paper, USB, memory stick, etc. With appropriate software, you can manage your assets on your computer or your phone.
Bitcoin on an account, to either a holder of bitcoins in has given you, for example in Exchange for property, either go through an Exchange platform that converts conventional currencies in bitcoins, is earned by participating in the operations of collective control of the currency.
The sources of Bitcoin codes have been released under an open source license MIT which allows to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the software, subject to insert a copyright notice into all copies.
Bitcoin creator, Satoshi Nakamoto
What is the Mining of bitcoin?
Technical details :
During mining, your computer performs cryptographic hashes (two successive SHA256) on what is called a header block. For each new hash, mining software uses a different random number that called Nuncio. According to the content of the block and the nonce value typically used to express the current target. This number is called the difficulty of mining. The difficulty of mining is calculated by comparing how much it is difficult to generate a block compared to the first created block. This means that a difficulty of 70000 is 70000 times more effort that it took to Satoshi Nakamoto to generate the first block. Where mining was much slower and poorly optimized.
The difficulty changes each 2016 blocks. The network tries to assign the difficulty in such a way that global computing power takes exactly 14 days to generate 2016 blocks. That's why the difficulty increases along with the power of the network.
Material :
In the beginning, mining with a processor (CPU) was the only way to undermine bitcoins. (GPU) graphics cards have possibly replaced the CPU due to their nature, which allowed an increase between 50 x to 100 x in computing power by using less electricity by megahash compared to a CPU.
Although any modern GPU can be used to make the mining, the brand AMD GPU architecture has proved to be far superior to nVidia to undermine bitcoins and the ATI Radeon HD 5870 card was the most economical for a time.
For a more complete list of graphics cards and their performance, see Wiki Bitcoin: comparison of mining equipment
In the same way that transition CPU to GPU, the world of mining has evolved into the use of the Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) as a mining platform. Although FPGAs did not offer an increase of 50 x to 100 x speed of calculation as the transition from CPU to GPU, they offered a better energy efficiency.
A typical HD/s 600 graphics card consumes about 400w of power, while a typical FPGA device can offer a rate of hash of 826 MH/s to 80w of power consumption, a gain of 5 x more calculations for the same energy power. Since energy efficiency is a key factor in the profitability of mining, it was an important step for the GPU to FPGA migration for many people.
The world of the mining of bitcoin is now migrating to the Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC). An ASIC is a chip designed specifically to accomplish a single task. Unlike FPGAs, an ASIC is unable to be reprogrammed for other tasks. An ASIC designed to undermine bitcoins cannot and will not do anything else than to undermine bitcoins.
The stiffness of an ASIC allows us to offer an increase of 100 x computing power while reducing power consumption compared to all other technologies. For example, a classic device to offer 60 GH/s (1 hashes equals 1000 Megahash. 1GH/s = 1000 Mh/s) while consuming 60w of electricity. Compared to the GPU, it is an increase in computing power of 100 x and a reduction of power consumption by a factor of 7.
Unlike the generations of technologies that have preceded the ASIC, ASIC is the "end of the line" when we talk about important technology change. The CPUs have been replaced by the GPUs, themselves replaced by FPGAs that were replaced by ASICs.
There is nothing that can replace the ASICs now or in the immediate future. There will be technological refinements in ASIC products, and improvements in energy efficiency, but nothing that may match increased from 50 x to 100 x the computing power or a 7 x reduction in power consumption compared with the previous technology.
Which means that the energy efficiency of an ASIC device is the only important factor of all product ASIC, since the estimated lifetime of an ASIC device is superior to the entire history of the mining of bitcoin. It is conceivable that a purchased ASIC device today is still in operation in two years if the unit still offers a profitable enough economic to keep power consumption. The profitability of mining is also determined by the value of bitcoin but in all cases, more a device has a good energy efficiency, it is profitable.
Software :
There are two ways to make mining: by yourself or as part of a team (a pool). If you are mining for yourself, you must install the Bitcoin software and configure it to JSON-RPC (see: run Bitcoin). The other option is to join a pool. There are multiple available pools. With a pool, the profit generated by any block generated by a member of the team is split between all members of the team. The advantage of joining a team is to increase the frequency and stability of earnings (this is called reduce the variance) but gains will be lower. In the end, you will earn the same amount with the two approaches. Undermine solo allows you to receive earnings huge but very infrequent, while miner with a pool can offer you small stable and steady gains.
Once you have your software configured or that you have joined a pool, the next step is to configure the mining software. The software the most populare for ASIC/FPGA/GPU currently is CGminer or a derivative designed specifically for FPGAS and ASICs, BFGMiner.
If you want a quick overview of mining without install any software, try Bitcoin Plus, a Bitcoin minor running in your browser with your CPU. It is not profitable to make serious mining, but it is a good demonstration of the principle of the mining team.
submitted by Josephbitcoin to u/Josephbitcoin [link] [comments]

New people please read this. [upvote for visibility please]

I am seeing too many new people come and and getting confused. Litecoin wiki isn't the greatest when it comes to summing up things so I will try to do things as best as I can. I will attempt to explain from what I have learned and answer some questions. Hopefully people smarter than me will also chime in. I will keep this post updated as much as I can.
Preface
Litecoin is a type to electronic currency. It is just like Bitcoin but it there are differences. Difference explained here.
If you are starting to mine now chances are that you have missed the Bitcoin mining train. If you really want your time and processing power to not go to waste you should mine LTC because the access to BTC from there is much easier.
Mining. What is it?
Let's get this straight. When making any financial commitment to this be prepared to do it with "throw away" money. Mining is all about the hashrate and is measured in KH/s (KiloHash/sec). Unlike the powerful ASICs (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) that are used to mine bitcoins using hashrates in the GH/s and even TH/s, litecoin mining has only been able to achieve at the very best MH/s. I think the highest I've seen is 130 MH/s so far. Which leads us to our next section.
Mining Hardware
While CPU mining is still a thing it is not as powerful as GPU mining. Your laptop might be able to get 1 a month. However, I encourage you to consult this list first. List of hardware comparison You will find the highest of processors can maybe pull 100 KH/s and if we put this into a litecoin mining calculator it doesn't give us much.
Another reason why you don't want to mine with your CPU is pretty simple. You are going to destroy it.
So this leaves us with GPUs. Over the past few months (and years) the HD 7950 has been the favourite because it drains less power and has a pretty good hashrate. But recently the introduction of the R9 290 (not the x) has changed the game a bit. People are getting 850 KH/s - 900 KH/s with that card. It's crazy.
Should I mine?
Honestly given the current difficulty you can make a solid rig for about $1100 with a hashrate of 1700 KH/s which would give you your investment back in about a month and a half. I am sure people out there can create something for much cheaper. Here is a good example of a setup as suggested by dystopiats
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks
Type Item Price
CPU AMD Sempron 145 2.8GHz Single-Core Processor $36.01 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock 970 EXTREME4 ATX AM3+ Motherboard $99.48 @ OutletPC
Memory Crucial Ballistix Tactical Tracer 4GB (1 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory $59.99 @ Newegg
Video Card Sapphire Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card (3-Way CrossFire) $245.38 @ Newegg
Video Card Sapphire Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card (3-Way CrossFire) $245.38 @ Newegg
Video Card Sapphire Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card (3-Way CrossFire) $245.38 @ Newegg
Power Supply SeaSonic Platinum 860W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $146.98 @ SuperBiiz
Total
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available. $1078.60
Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-11-29 00:52 EST-0500
Estimated Hashrate (with GPU overclocking) : 1900 KH/s
Hardware Fundamentals
CPU - Do you need a powerful CPU? No but make sure it is a decent one. AMD CPUs are cheap to buy right now with tons of power. Feel free to use a Sempron or Celeron depending on what Motherboard you go with.
RAM - Try to get at least 4 GB so as to not run into any trouble. Memory is cheap these days. I am saying 4 GB only because of Windoze. If you are plan to run this on Linux you can even get away with less memory.
HDD Any good ol 7200 RPM hard drive will do. Make sure it is appropriate. No point in buying a 1TB hard drive. Since, this is a newbie's guide I assumed most won't know how to run linux, but incase you do you can get a USB flash drive and run linux from it thus removing the need for hard drive all toghether. (thanks dystopiats)
GPU - Consult the list of hardware of hardware I posted above. Make sure you consider the KH/s/W ratio. To me the 290 is the best option but you can skimp down to 7950 if you like.
PSU - THIS IS BLOODY IMPORTANT. Most modern GPUs are power hungry so please make sure you are well within the limits of your power consumption.
MOTHERBOARD - Ok, so a pretty popular board right now is Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD3 and the ASRock 970 Extreme4. Some people are even going for Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD5 and even the mighty Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD7 because it has more PCI-E slots. 6 to be exact. However you may not need that much. With risers you can get more shoved into less.
PCI-E RISERS - These are called risers. They come in x16 to x16 and x1 to x16 connections. Here is the general rule of thumb. This is very important. Always get a POWERED riser otherwise you will burn a hole in your MoBo. A powered rise as a molex connector so that additional power from PSU can be supplied.
When it comes to hardware I've provided the most basic knowledge you need. Also, take a look at cryptobader's website. This is very helpful. Please visit the mining section of Litecoin Forums and the litecoinmining subreddit for more indepth info.
Mining Software
Now that you have assembled your hardware now you need to get into a pool. But before you do that you need a mining software. There are many different ones but the one that is most popular is cgminer. Download it and make sure you read the README. It is a very robust piece of software. Please read this if you want to know more. (thanks BalzOnYer4Head)
Mining Pools
Now that your hardware and software is ready. I know nothing about solo mining other than the fact that you have to be very lucky and respectable amount of hashing power to decrypt a block. So it is better to join pools. I have been pool hopping for a bit and really liked give-me-coin previously known to the community as give-me-ltc. They have a nice mobile app and 0% pool fees. This is really a personal preference. Take a look at this list and try some yourself.
How do I connect to a pool?
Most pools will give you a tutorial on how to but the basics are as follows:
  • Signup for a pool
  • Create a worker for your account. Usually one worker per rig (Yes people have multiple rigs) is generally a good idea.
  • Create a .run file. Open up notepad and type cgminer.exe -o (address_to_the_miningpool:port_number) -u (yourusername.workername) -p (your_worker_password_if_you_made_one). Then File>Save As>runcgminer.run (Make sure the drop down is set to "All Files" and .txt document.) and save in the same folder as cgminer. That's it.
  • Double click on runcgminer.run (or whatever you named it) and have fun mining.
Mining Profitability
This game is not easy. If it was, practically everyone would be doing it. This is strictly a numbers game and there are calculations available that can help you determine your risk on your investments. 4 variables you need to consider when you are starting to mine:
Hardware cost: The cost of your physical hardware to run this whole operation.
Power: Measured in $/KwH is also known as the operating cost.
Difficulty rate: To put it in layman's terms the increase in difficulty is inversely proportional to amount of coin you can mine. The harder the difficulty the harder it is to mine coin. Right now difficulty is rising at about 18% per 3 days. This can and will change since all you miners are soon going to jump on the band wagon.
Your sanity: I am not going to tell you to keep calm and chive on because quiet frankly that is stupid. What I will tell you not to get too carried away. You will pull you hair out. Seriously.
Next thing you will need is a simple tool. A mining profitability calculator. I have two favourite ones.
coinwarz
I like this one cause it is simple. The fields are self explanatory. Try it.
bitcoinwisdom
I like this one because it is a more real life scenario calculator and more complicated one (not really). It also takes increasing difficulty into account.
Please note: This is the absolute basic info you need. If you have more questions feel free to ask and or google it!
More Below.
submitted by craeyon to litecoin [link] [comments]

Thinking of ordering an ASIC? There is most likely nothing you can order right now that will earn you more BTC than you can buy right now. In fact, there is not really anything you can order right now that will ROI, even using generous figures.

Disclaimer: I am a miner and have ASICs, so there is a conflict of interest in posting this. But I'm not just trying to talk potential competition out of mining. If you think you'd enjoy it and aren't driven solely by making a profit, I've always recommended it when asked.
Disclaimer 2: You will likely see much better ROI on buying Bitcoins than mining them. Some already understand this and want to mine anyway, and I am one of those (although I had bought coins along with ordering ASICs). I'm sure this point will be echoed repeatedly.
Disclaimer 3: This is based on the mining calculator and ASIC info currently listed on TGB (using default 117% monthly increase in difficulty). This is only a guess based on past performance, which many consider to be too low of a guess. But for the sake of this post, I'd rather take a conservative (low) guess to present a best-case scenario.
Disclaimer 4: I'm tired. I apologize for the disclaimers, but I've used reddit enough to know I need to qualify every sentence before I write it.
After receiving the ASICs I ordered 7+ months ago, I wanted to compare my investment with the new miners that have appeared since I ordered. It turns out that anything you were to order right now will most likely lose money, it's just a matter of how much you want to lose. If anything is incorrect here feel free to prove otherwise. I'd appreciate any corrections. My reason for posting is because I was honestly surprised by what I found, but maybe my math is wrong or maybe TGB's data is wrong.
The lowest cost-per-Gh/s available to pre-order right now is $3, but those miners won't be shipping until January 2014 (Cointerra). The next option would be $4 shipping in December (Bitmine). Even at these low prices-per-Gh/s, that is too late. The lowest cost-per-Gh/s shipping in November is $9.10 (KnC) but even if you start mining November 1st, that is not enough. This is all assuming these companies ship and ship on time. KnC has started shipping, but if you were to order today you definitely won't be mining all of November.
Take these figures with a grain of salt. You'll want to make your own calculations before making any investment decision, but these are rough estimates.
These calculations are based on a 100Gh/s miner running at 50W (0.5W/Gh which is below what any listed miner is capable of achieving: lowest is 0.6W/Gh). If you scale it up to a 1Th/s miner running at 500W, you get about $0.60 extra to spend per Gh/s and still get the same ROI.
So unless you have free electricity or you're an Electrical Engineer that dabbles in the black arts, your ROI will be even less likely. This is also using a $0.10/kWh rate, which I think is also low for many people.
There are a lot of variables here, so this is in no way a guaranteed outcome. To determine ROI I used BTC instead of USD, so the future price of Bitcoin is not a factor here. If you're buying a miner in USD (or other fiat) and are basing ROI on that same currency, then the future BTC price when you sell your mined coins would matter. This also doesn't account for "miner protection plans" which we have yet to see in action so it's difficult to say how well they'll work.
The way I personally look at it: most hobbies don't ROI and if you think mining is valid hobby and can take a loss then go for it. There can be more to mining than "plugging it in and watching it" as is usually the argument of people who don't mine.
Again, please feel free to correct any mistakes. It's very late here and I did this quickly. This is as much of a question asking if my thinking is correct as it is a notice to potential ASIC buyers. I'll edit this post as necessary.
TL;DR - If profit is your only goal, don't buy an ASIC right now.
submitted by milone to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

600 new Bitmain S9 Antminers for sale

We have 600 new Bitmain S9 Antminers for sale and ready to ship from Vancouver, British Columbia Canada warehouse. Authentic Bitman hardware backed by full customer support and 6 months warranty.
https://datacenterbuilders.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/IMG_5308-e1538458943837-1030x773.jpeg
  1. Hash Rate: 13.5 TH/s ±7%
  2. Power Consumption: 1323W (at the wall, with APW3, 93% efficiency, 25C ambient temp)
  3. Power Efficiency: 0.098 W/GH (at the wall, with APW3, 93% efficiency, 25C ambient temp)
  4. Rated Voltage: 11.60 ~13.00V
  5. ASIC Chip: BM1387
  6. Dimensions: 350mm(L)135mm(W)158mm(H)
  7. Cooling: 2x 12038 fans
  8. Operating Temperature: 0 C to 40 C
  9. Network Connection: Ethernet
  10. Default Frequency: 600M
If interested, please contact [email protected] with #miners required for pricing.
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submitted by MarketBot to HellsCrypto [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/CryptoCurrency] My concerns about SmartCash

The following post by KnifeOfPi2 is being replicated because some comments within the post(but not the post itself) have been openly removed.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ CryptoCurrency/comments/7oh2uz
The original post's content was as follows:
Hello folks!
I have been doing a lot of reading about the SmartCash cryptocurrency recently. SmartCash claims to be a private cryptocurrency that also focuses on a community-centered model.
However, a lot of what I've found has concerned me.
But first - I'd like to invite anyone with an opposing point of view to share their opinions after reading this. I'm not in this to spread baseless accusations, I just want an educated conversation. Please do not downvote simply because you disagree; instead, read my post, make a comment and discuss the topic with me. I've sent PM's to several people who support SmartCash in order to let them make their opinions clear.
That said, let's go through this point by point - we'll start with the distribution.
From the official SmartCash website:
Traditional cryptocurrencies, like Bitcoin, reward only the miners while neglecting the other actors that play an active role in maintaining, developing and promoting the project. SmartCash is a community-centric cryptocurrency, where community and development comes first. 80% of the block reward has been allocated to fund SmartHive community proposals as well as the Hive Teams. 20% of the remaining block reward has been allocated to Mining (5%) and SmartRewards (15%).
In the name of staying unbiased, I am going to acknowledge my ideological beliefs about mining, as well as my own personal biases as a miner, that miners should receive 100% of the rewards for the work they did. With this out of the way, let's discuss the mathematics of SmartCash's block reward distribution.
80% goes to community projects, 15% goes to SmartRewards (staking equivalent, but not used for consensus), and 5% goes to the miners. In theory, this will lead to 95% less miners than normal, ensuring miners get paid roughly the same. In practice, this won't necessarily be true.
But the existence of fewer miners also presents many issues. There have been several 51% attacks against cryptocurrencies that give all block rewards to miners - Krypton in 2016, Feathercoin in 2013, and Dashcoin (a cryptonote fork DSH, not DASH) by MinerGate in April of 2017.
Chain consensus with SmartCash is determined entirely by proof of work, not proof of stake; therefore you do not need to own any coins in order to attack the network and achieve 51% hashrate.
In the case of a cryptocurrency that gives miners 5% of the block rewards, achieving 51% of nethash is quite easy, because fewer people will be mining. SmartCash's current network hashrate is 10 Th/s or 10 trillion hashes per second; a conservative estimate for a GTX 1080's hashrate is 1 Gh/s or 1 billion hashes per second. Therefore, the network is currently secured by the equivalent of 10,000 GTX 1080 GPUs.
Given that this GPU costs approximately $500, it would take about $5 million to conduct a 51% attack on the network. At nicehash prices of ~0.3 BTC/TH/S/Day, this would cost ~$60,000 per day, taking into account a necessary raise in the offered price to 'persuade' more people to switch to Keccak algo, as only 2TH/s is currently for sale on Nicehash.
Even worse, Keccak (Smartcash’s hashing algorithm) was specifically designed to be ASIC-friendly. From the official Keccak website:
Keccak, the winner of the SHA-3 competition, is blazing fast when implemented on dedicated (ASIC) or programmable (FPGA) hardware.
So if somebody ever modified a Keccak ASIC for mining, it would also be easy to conduct a 51% attack.
Let’s move on. Remember how they said that 80% of the block rewards go to a community fund? That address is here, and it controls 55% of the SmartCash in existence. This address is used to fund proposals that are voted on by the community. The problem is that the private key to this address is owned by the developers - and regardless of their past honesty, this system still requires trust in them. A trust-required system is directly contrary to the principles of cryptocurrency. The developers, despite your trust in them, could still sell some of those coins at any time.
Next up we'll discuss SmartCash's privacy. SmartCash uses the Zerocoin protocol for privacy, as it was forked from Zcoin. Zerocoin breaks the link between sender and receiver, but unlike Zerocash and ringCT, it does not hide the transaction amount. Furthermore, SmartCash's privacy is optional, and it is transparent by default. Transparency by default is bad for the following reasons:
(1) it reduces the anonymity set
(2) it makes private transactions inherently more suspicious
(3) it allows sender to harm the privacy of recipient
(4) it makes it impossible to hide your wealth
(5) it makes the currency non-fungible.
My last concern with SmartCash is the coin distribution. Currently, as shown on the SmartCash Rich List, the top 100 addresses control 98.42% of funds. This is a highly unbalanced situation, and it also means that the vast majority of SmartCash wealth is held by a small number of people. With Bitcoin, the top 100 addresses control roughly 32% of funds, which is not perfect, but certainly much better.
In summary, SmartCash is a great idea - a private, community-oriented cryptocurrency - but it is executed in a suboptimal manner.
I would be happy to hear your opinions on this, whether you agree or disagree.
-KnifeOfPi2
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

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fee,.,0.15,.,bitcoins,.,0 25,.,bitcoins,.,0.05,.,bitcoin,.,in euro,.,bitcoin,.,2.0,.,0.1,.,bitcoins,.,0.21,.,bitcoins,.,bitcoin,.,1st august,.,bitcoin,.,1 million,.,bitcoin,.,101,.,bitcoin,.,10 year chart,.,bitcoin,.,10000,.,bitcoin,.,148,.,,.,bitcoin,.,10 year prediction,.,bitcoin,.,100k,.,bitcoin,.,100 dollars,.,bitcoin,.,10 years ago,.,1,.,bitcoin,.,in gbp,.,1,.,bitcoin,.,in pounds,.,1,.,bitcoin,.,in £,.,1,.,bitcoin,.,to dollar,.,1,.,bitcoin,.,in inr,.,1,.,bitcoin,.,to euro,.,1,.,bitcoin,.,in gdp,.,1,.,bitcoin,.,in eur,.,1,.,bitcoin,.,to myr,.,1,.,bitcoin,.,in sterling,.,bitcoin,.,2010,.,bitcoin,.,2017,.,bitcoin,.,2020,.,bitcoin,.,2018,.,bitcoin,.,2009,.,bitcoin,.,2013,.,bitcoin,.,21 million,.,bitcoin,.,2012,.,bitcoin,.,2014,.,2,.,bitcoin,.,to usd,.,2,.,bitcoin,.,price,.,2,.,bitcoin,.,to inr,.,2,.,bitcoin,.,wallets,.,2,.,bitcoins to dollars,.,2,.,bitcoins free,.,2,.,bitcoins a month,.,2,.,bitcoin,.,qt,.,bitcoin,.,2 year chart,.,bitcoin,.,2 paypal,.,bitcoin,.,3000,.,bitcoin,.,31st july,.,bitcoin,.,3 confirmations,.,bitcoin,.,3.0,.,bitcoin,.,3 year chart,.,bitcoin,.,3 month chart,.,bitcoin,.,300,.,bitcoin,.,365 club,.,bitcoin,.,3000 usd,.,bitcoin,.,30 confirmations,.,3,.,bitcoins in gbp,.,3,.,bitcoins,.,3,.,bitcoins to usd,.,3,.,bitcoin,.,in euro,.,3,.,bitcoin,.,to eur,.,bitcoin,.,3 unlimited,.,bitcoin,.,3 day chart,.,bitcoin,.,3 address,.,bitcoin,.,4000,.,bitcoin,.,4chan,.,bitcoin,.,4 billion,.,bitcoin,.,401k,.,bitcoin,.,4 backpage,.,bitcoin,.,43,.,bitcoin,.,40000,.,bitcoin,.,4k,.,bitcoin,.,4 year chart,.,bitcoin,.,48,.,4,.,bitcoins,.,4,.,bitcoins to usd,.,4,.,bitcoins in gbp,.,4,.,bitcoin,.,to eur,.,bitcoins 4 backpage,.,bitcoin,.,4 igaming,.,bitcoin,.,4 u,.,bitcoin,.,4 november,.,bitcoin,.,4 cash,.,bitcoin,.,5 year chart,.,bitcoin,.,51 attack,.,bitcoin,.,500,.,bitcoin,.,5 year,.,bitcoin,.,500 000,.,bitcoin,.,5000,.,bitcoin,.,50000,.,bitcoin,.,5 year price,.,bitcoin,.,5 years ago,.,bitcoin,.,5 year forecast,.,5,.,bitcoins in pounds,.,5,.,bitcoins,.,5,.,bitcoins to usd,.,5,.,bitcoin,.,free,.,5,.,bitcoin,.,in euro,.,bitcoin,.,5 years,.,bitcoin,.,5 minutes,.,bitcoin,.,5 min,.,bitcoin,.,5 unlimited generator,.,bitcoin,.,666,.,bitcoin,.,6 months,.,bitcoin,.,6 confirmations,.,bitcoin,.,6 month chart,.,bitcoin,.,6000,.,bitcoin,.,60 minutes,.,bitcoin,.,6 confirmations time,.,bitcoin,.,6 month price,.,bitcoin,.,6 years ago,.,bitcoin,.,60 day chart,.,6,.,bitcoin,.,network confirmations,.,,.,
submitted by besterse to BestCryptoPlatform [link] [comments]

Trusted cloud mining services in overview

https://hashflare.io/3724EA75 (founded 2013): Contracts (One-year contracts): SHA-256: 1.5$ for 10 GH/s -> 150$ 1TH/s -> 1950$ 13TH/s (Yet 1950$ is only 1-year rental whereas your rig will stay yours forever) Fees: 0.0035 USD per every 10 GH/s (currently approx. 30% of daily earnings) ->Hashflare Profit: 3.79$-1.5$(Hardware)-1.2775$(Maintenance)=1.01$/year per 10 GH/s -> 1313$/year per 13 TH/s
SHA-256 (real S9 Miner): 2000$ 13TH/s (cf. Hashflare 1950$) Fees: 0.003$ USD per every 10 GH/s (currently approx. 25% of daily earnings) ->S9 mining rig(1400w with 0.1$ Cost pet KW/h) Profit: 3.79$-1.53$(Hardware)-1.095$(Maintenance)=1.16$/year per 10 GH/s -> 1508$/year per 13 TH/s (cf. Hashflare 1313$) But keep in mind that you can sell your hardware at any time as it stays yours forever (not 1-Year Contract) Profit w/o hardware: 3.79$-1.095$(Maintenance)=2.7$/year per 10 GH/s -> 3510$/year per 13 TH/s
*As you pay only for the hardware, you have to pay for the maintenance fees in both cases.
Conclusion: If you decide to buy your own hardware it will will stay yours forever. Nevertheless, keep in mind that you need a storage place for your mining rig and have to deal with the noise, so it should not be turned on 24/7 in your apartment.
Scrypt: 7.5$ for 1 MH/s -> 3750$ for 500 MH/s Fees: 0.01$ per every 1 MH/s (currently approx. 62% of daily earnings) ->(cf. real miner only 15%) Profit: 9.54$-7.5$(Hardware)-5$(Maintenance)=-2.96$/year per 1 MH/s -> -1480$/year per 500 MH/s)
Scrypt(real L3+ Miner): 5$ for 1 MH/s -> 2500$ for 500 MH/s Fees: 0.0038$ per every 1 MH/s (currently approx. 15% of daily earnings) ->L3+ mining rig (800w with 0.1$ Cost pet KW/h) Profit: 9.54$-5$(Hardware)-1.387$(Maintenance)=3.153$/year per 1 MH/s -> 1576$/year per 500 MH/s But keep in mind that you can sell your hardware at any time as it stays yours forever (not 1-Year Contract) Profit w/o hardware: 9.54$-1.387$(Maintenance)=8.153$/year per 1 MH/s -> 4076.5$/year per 500 MH/s
Conclusion: At this point I strongly advise not to buy any Scrypt contracts on Hashflare since you will end up losing money by doing so unless LTC suddenly skyrockets.
As other Hashflare contracts (Zero-fee contracts) are not profitable in my opinion, I will only briefly summarize the results: ETHASH: 2.2$ for 100 KH/s -> 220$ for 10 MH/s -> yields approx. 153$/year (0.51ETH), thus you will lose 67$ unless ETH goes magically up X11: 3.2$ for 1 MH/s -> 320$ for 100 MH/s -> yields approx. 60$/year (0.2 DASH), thus you will lose 260$ unless DASH goes magically up EQUIHASH: 2$ for 1 H/s -> 200$ for 100 H/s -> yields approx. 127$/year (0.54 ZEC), thus you will lose 73$ unless ZEC goes magically up
To sum it up, of course you can try your luck and hope that one of the altcoins will skyrocket to the moon and then you will make some money by joining these contracts. Nevertheless, you could also simply buy the following altcoin and make some money by simply holding the altcoin currency on an exchange. So as far as I am concerned, the only reasonable contract in Hashflare at the moment is the SHA-256 Contract.
https://www.eobot.com/new.aspx?referid=261758 (founded 2013): Eobot offers several contracts like Cloud Folding, SETI, Scrypt etc. Though they are not very profitable and thus I dont want to discuss them in detail. The only reasonable contract would be the SHA-256 5-Year Rental: 6.8$ for 10 GH/s (cf. Hashflare only 1.5$) but also keep in mind that it is a 5 Year Contract and not one year contract(cf. 1.5$*5=7.5$ for 5-Year Hashflare SHA-256).
SHA-256 5-Year Rental: 6.8$ for 10 GH/s Fees: 0.0021$ per every 10 GH/s (cf. Hashflare 0.0035$) Profit: 3.79$-(6.8$/5=1.36$)-0.77$(Maintenance)=1.66$/year per 10 GH/s -> 2158$/year per 13 TH/s (cf. Hashflare 1313$)
https://www.hashnest.com/(founded 2013): Hashnest belongs to BitMain(world's foremost producer of ASIC bitcoin mining hardware) and offers you different cloud mining possibilities. What is interesting about this site is the fact that you can buy other people´s cloud mining power vice versa (can sell it back at any time) on the Market. It is very beginner-friendly since they have the possibility to start with as little as 8000 Satoshi and buy 1 GH/s. Yet keep in mind that the withdrawal fee is 20.000 Satoshi, so you should invest at least 40.000 Satoshi in order to make some money after the withdrawal fees are deducted.
Contracts (lifetime): AntL3+: 7$ for 1 MH/s -> 3500$ for 500 MH/s (cf. L3+ mining rig discussed above) Fees: 0.0027$ USD per every 1 MH/s (currently approx. 10% of daily earnings) Profit: 9.57$-7$(Hardware)-0.98$(Maintenance)=1.59$/year per 1MH/s -> 795$/year per 500 MH/s (cf. Hashflare - 1480$) But keep in mind that you can sell your hardware at any time and it is a lifetime contract so it stays yours forever (no 1-Year Contract) Profit w/o hardware: 9.57$-0.98$(Maintenance)=8.59$/year per 1MH/s -> 4295$/year per 500 MH/s
AntS9: 3.51$ for 10 GH/s -> 351$ 1TH/s -> 4563$ 13TH/s (cf. Hashflare 1950$) Fees: 0.0019$ USD per every 10 GH/s (currently approx. 18.5% of daily earnings) Profit: 3.79$-3.51$(Hardware)-0.69$(Maintenance)=-0.4$/year per 10 GH/s -> -533$/year per 13 TH/s But keep in mind that you can sell your hardware at any time and it is a lifetime contract so it stays yours forever (no 1-Year Contract) Profit w/o hardware: 3.79$-0.69$(Maintenance)=3.1$/year per 10 GH/s -> 4300 $/year per 13 TH/s (cf. Hashflare 1313$)
AntS7: 2.45$ for 10 GH/s -> 245$ 1TH/s -> 3185$ 13TH/s (cf. Hashflare 1950$) Fees: 0.0041$ USD per every 10 GH/s (currently approx. 40% of daily earnings) Profit: 3.79$-2.45$(Hardware)-1.49$(Maintenance)=-0.15$/year per 10 GH/s -> -195$/year per 13 TH/s But keep in mind that you can sell your hardware at any time and it is a lifetime contract so it stays yours forever Profit w/o hardware: 3.79$-1.49$(Maintenance)=2.3$/year per 10 GH/s -> 2990$/year per 13 TH/s
https://www.genesis-mining.com/a/1671951: (founded 2014; discussing only small contracts, bigger contracts cheeper) BTC (Lifetime contract): 1.5$ for 10 GH/s -> 30$ for 200 GH/s -> 150$ for 1TH/s -> 1950$ for 13 TH/s Fees: 0.0028$ per every 10 GH/s (currently approx. 29% of daily earnings) Profit: 3.79$-1.5$(Hardware)-1.02$(Maintenance)=1.27$/year per 10 GH/s -> 1651$/year per 13 TH/s (cf. Hashflare 1313$) But keep in mind that it is a lifetime contract so the hardware stays yours as long as profitable Profit w/o hardware: 3.79$-1.02$(Maintenance)=2.77$/year per 10 GH/s -> 3601$/year per 13 TH/s
Contracts (2 years w/o fees) ETH: 30$ for 1 MH/s -> 300$ for 10 MH/s Profit: 15.31$*2-30$(Hardware)= 0.62$/2 years per 1 MH/s -> 6.2$/2 years per 10 MH/s
LTC: 14$ for 1 MH/s -> 28$ for 2 MH/s -> 140$ for 10 MH/s Profit: 9.57$*2-14$(Hardware)= 5.14$/2 years per 1 MH/s -> 51.4$/2 years per 10 MH/s
ZCASH: 48$ for 25H/s Profit: 31.78$*2-48$(Hardware)= 13.56$/2 years per 25H/s
MONERO: 50$ for 60H/s Profit: 32.58$*2-50$(Hardware)= 15.16$/2 years per 60H/s
DASH: 6$ for 1 MH/s -> 30$ for 5 MH/s -> 60$ for 10 MH/s Profit: 0.59$*2-6$(Hardware)= -4.82$/2 years per 1 MH/s -> -48.2$/2 years per 10 MH/s
Best contracts at the moment: Genesis Mining: SHA-256-> 1651$/year per 13 TH/s Hashflare: SHA-256 -> 1313$/year per 13 TH/s Eobot: SHA-256 -> 2158$/year per 13 TH/s (*buying a 5yr contract, thus the outcome may be quite unpredictable!) Hashnest: L3+ -> 795$/year per 500 MH/s
This review should not be taken as financial advice, merely an analysis of current options. Since cryptocurrencies are highly volatile, cloud mining as well as mining in general involve certain risks e.g. difficulty increase, price drops etc. If you have any additional information or questions feel free to comment and I will try to answer as soon as possible :)
submitted by adamec213 to Bitconnect [link] [comments]

Raspberry Pi & ASIC combo?

I have a Raspberry Pi and want to learn about bitcoin mining so I am looking to get an ASIC miner for educational purposes. I'm not trying to spend a ton of money so I was thinking of getting a Butterfly Labs 60 GH/s off of ebay.
Are there any other ASIC miners I should be looking at that's compatible with the Raspberry Pi?
submitted by FiftyBands to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

[SG] In-Stock in US: USB DualMiner 300-350Kh/s at 60 watts + 8Gh/s-11.25Gh/s Bitcoin - 260k Doge each

Finally in Stock.
These ASIC miners will mine Dogecoin and Bitcoin at the same time. These are low power consumption units, so you will save money in energy cost. They draw about 60 watts each while mining.
The worlds first ASIC miner that can operate in three modes. Mode 1: Scrypt only (Litecoin/Dogecoin) Mode 2: SHA only (Bitcoin) Mode 3: SHA & Scrypt combined.
Each unit is capable of producing up to the following: Scrypt only mode: 350 KH/S SHA only mode: 11.25 GH/S Combined Scrypt & SHA mode: 8Gh/s SHA + 300Kh/s Scrypt
All figures are approximations.
Note: you will need a power supply for each these. It needs to be: 12Volt 7Amp , adapter : 5.5mm x 2.1mm.
300k Doge each, Includes US shipping. (upped the cost due to weak Doge.) New listing here: http://www.reddit.com/dogemarket/comments/1zeaju/sg_asic_350400khs_at_7watts_dogecoinscrypt_mine
http://imgur.com/i6LfdpL
http://imgur.com/pZ0zt6C
http://imgur.com/qBQRx5G
submitted by Sseleman to dogemarket [link] [comments]

I am considering investing my money into bit coin mining and have some questions about ASIC's

So live in my parents house in the southwestern US where the house runs on mounted solar panels(free power). I have considered investing in either the 50 GH/s Bitcoin Miner from BFL or the Avalon ASIC which says it mines 60 GH/s either way when I type this into a Calculator it SAYS i should pay off the 3-6 thousand dollar investment in like 20 days. This all sounds to good to be true. I want to know your opinion.
submitted by JonathanDnD to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Gumtree and bitCoin :)

Basically I wanted to sell my ASIC miner on gumtree. but my Add kept removed from the site. so I have asked them why. here is a transcript of the chat :)
http://puu.sh/54I2b/20db0c8979.png
• Rossana P: Hello, you are chatting with Rossana, how can I help? Kindly provide your ad id or email address if you haven’t already provided these details on the pre-chat form.
• You: Hi there, i have question regarding my add which has been removed
• You: Ive checked the allowed items on your gumtree : http://gumtree.force.com/Help/articles/General_Information/Items-not-allowed-on-GumtreeYou: and cannot find anything regarding my product that i wanted to sell
• Rossana P: Let me take a look at that for youYou: yes please
• Rossana P: Your ad was removed as we do not allow bit coins and other online points to be sold. Therefore items that contain this are not allowed
• Rossana P: are you there?
• You: sorryYou: yes
• You: it is not bitcoin
• You: its a device which can be purchased from your sister website ebay.
• You: REf: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Butterfly-Labs-BitForce-60-GH-s-BFL-ASIC-Miner-In-UK-/271306181008?pt=UK_Computing_Other_Computing_Networking&hash=item3f2b1bc990You: it is listed as computing and other computing hardware
• Rossana P: let me check for you
• You: sure!
• Rossana P: I have looked into this for you and as you can receive bitcoins with the device and we do not allow bitcoins, we cannot allow your item
• Rossana P: I apologise for any inconvenience caused
• You: This product does not explicitly receives bitcoin. it is a sha256 processor which designed to perform calculations. having said that it can be used for bitcoin calculations.
• You: you are allowing computer to be sold, bit coins can be gained from computers too
• Rossana P: Yes, however as it can be used for bit coins we do not allow it. I apologise for the inconvenience caused. We will gladly allow other ads posted by you however in this case we cannot
• You: may i know the difference between allowing computers and not allowing ASIC devices?
• You: just to inform you.. Mobile phones could be used to produce bit coins
• Rossana P: I can imagine that this can be frustrating to encounter however we cannot allow your ad. I will forward on your feedback
• You: You took the time to give me an answer for which I didn't questioned.
• You: Computers, mobile phones, graphic cards can be used to gain bitcoins.. why would you restrict ASIC devices only?
• Rossana P: these are our posting rules and as this devices can be used for bit coins we do not allow it.You:http://gumtree.force.com/Help/articles/General_Information/Items-not-allowed-on-GumtreeYou: is your restriction. could you please point me out where exactly i can find about this device?You: on your restriction list*
• Rossana P: The item is not named in the list however it can be related to virtual merchandise due to bit coins which we do not allow
• You: define merchandise.
• You: it has nothing to do with VIRTUAL merchandise
• You: it is an actual product which is capable of perform complex calculations. it can be used for mathematical purposes, educational purposes anything but calculations
• Rossana P: As advised these are our terms and conditions and we cannot allow you ad to go live as the item can be used for bit coins we do not allow. I apologise for any inconvenience caused and I can imagine that this can be frustrating , however this does not comply with our posting rules as advised by our policy review team, with whom I have consulted. for this reason I cannot advise you further or otherwise on the matter.You: would i be able to take legal action against you? because you haven't listed the item on your restriction list. And failing to give provide a correct statement.
• Rossana P: As advised we do not allow the ad as it can be used for bit coins which we do not allow. I cannot advise you further or otherwise on the matter, for that reason I will have to terminate this chat
And disconnected :D
submitted by xkrishx to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bit.Asic - finally received our first Bitcoin Asic Mining Rig from Butterfly Labs

https://bitfunder.com/asset/BIT.ASIC
We are happy to announce that we have finally received our first Bitcoin Asic Mining Rig from Butterfly Labs.
Butterfly Labs Orders: check out the images tab for screen shots and pictures of hardware we have received that are currently in production.
Order # 100049260, pay-dated 4/2/2013, for 1 Butterfly Labs (30 GH/s Bitcoin Miner) (Purchased and Confirmed)
Order # 100031677, pay-dated 4/2/2013, for 1 Butterfly Labs (30 GH/s Bitcoin Miner) (Purchased and Confirmed)
Order # 100067004, pay-dated 6/16/2013, for 1 Butterfly Labs (50 GH/s Bitcoin Miner with 10 GH/s upgrade totaling 60 GH/s) (Purchased and Confirmed)
Order # 100069703, pay-dated 7/1/2013, for 1 Butterfly Labs (50 GH/s Bitcoin Miner with 10 GH/s upgrade totaling 60 GH/s) (Purchased and Confirmed)
KnCMiner Orders:
Order #3246, pay-dated 7/3/2013, for 1 KnCMiner (100 GH/s Mercury Bitcoin Miner) (Purchased and Confirmed)
NEWEST Order #4345, pay-dated 7/23/2013, for 1 KnCMiner (400 GH/s Jupiter Bitcoin Miner) (Purchased and Confirmed)
** Total Hashing Power: 5.5GH/s - Actively Mining
*** Dividends: will be paid every Sunday
About the Issuer:
We are a team of IT professionals & business owners with expertise in the fields of server hardware / infrastructure and web engineering.
Alongside our ongoing mining activities, we recently launched Bit.co.in which offers the crypto-currency community a free address shortener. This is a launch pad for many ideas we have for the developing community.
We are actively involved in the forums.
Bitcoin Talk user profile: coinminers
Butterfly Labs user profile: bit.co.in
Feel free to contact us at:
Email: [email protected]
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bitcoinshortener
submitted by nimanator to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

BFL 60GH/s Butterfly Labs Single Bitcoin ASIC Miner 1400 Mh/s Ethereum Linzhi ASIC Miner Now Starting Production Rockminer R-Box ASIC Bitcoin Miner Setup Guide [TUTORIAL] HEX16A ASIC Bitcoin Miner W7 Butterflylabs Single Sc 60GH/s

Model Release Date Hashrate Power Algo Revenue 24h Profit 24h Top Coin; Bitmain Antminer Z15: Jun 2020: 420.00 kh/s: 1510W: Equihash $27.50 $23.88 The Avalon Nano 3 is a 3.6 GH/s miner, which will earn you about $1 per year. No fan is required and it just plugs into your USB port on any computer. Bitmain Antrouter R1 Wifi Solo Bitcoin Miner. The Bitmain AntRouter isn’t exactly a USB miner, but it is similar. To start mining Bitcoin, you'll need cheap electricity (a lot of it), an internet connection, and at least one Bitcoin mining hardware device - an ASIC Bitcoin miner. In the very early days (2009-2011) you could mine Bitcoin with a CPU, then mining software was created to utilize the computing power of a GPU, then came FPGAs, and in 2013 the 60 GH/s ASIC Bitcoin Miner - Single by Butterfly Labs. 3.0 out of 5 stars 10 ratings | 6 answered questions Currently unavailable. We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock. Customers also shopped for. Page 1 of 1 Start over Page 1 of 1 . This shopping feature will continue to load items when the Enter key is pressed. AntMiner V9~4TH/s @ 0.253W/GH Bitcoin/Bitcoin Cash ASIC Miner (V9) AntMiner L3++ Scrypt ASIC Litecoin Miner (L3++) AntMiner Bitmain New Power Supply APW7 PSU 1800w 110v 220v Much Better Than APW3++ for S9 or L3+ or Z9 Mini or D3 w/ 10 Connectors

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BFL 60GH/s Butterfly Labs Single Bitcoin ASIC Miner

Butterfly Labs 5 GH/s ASIC Bitcoin mining rig, ... Butterfly Labs ASIC bitcoin miner, Fluke 107...and a fair bit more. ... How to setup a 60 GH/s Butterfly Labs BFL Single SC ASIC Miner - Duration GPU Mining KILLER - The Innosilicon Ethereum ASIC Miner - A10 Review, Mining Profits, and Tutorial! - Duration: 16:24. ... USB Bitcoin Miner - The Power of 1000's Computers - Duration: 15:24. How to setup USB Asic Miner Blue Fury bitcoin miner 2.2~2.7 GH/s - Duration: 10:22. Eyeboot 13,457 views. ... Setup 60 GH/s Butterfly Labs BFL Single SC ASIC Miner - Duration: 4:00. KnCMiner Jupiter - Bitcoin Miner 500GH/s+ 28nm ASIC chips - unboxing and setup 1080p - Duration: 4:18. Florian Uhlemann 131,017 views This video will teach you how to setup R-Box bitcoin miner using cgminer on windows. For the full guide visit: https://www.eyeboot.com/how-to-setup-rockminer...

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