NorQuin Quinoa Flours Go Global With Alliance and

Sweet Potato and Sausage Quinoa Bake. Last year, Bitcoin led a motley pack of so-called cryptocurrencies in one of the great booms in market history, soaring over per. - Gluten free Recipes #healthy #fall #fall #recipes #glutenfree

Sweet Potato and Sausage Quinoa Bake. Last year, Bitcoin led a motley pack of so-called cryptocurrencies in one of the great booms in market history, soaring over per. - Gluten free Recipes #healthy #fall #fall #recipes #glutenfree submitted by DeepBach to RecipeInspiration [link] [comments]

11-28 19:52 - 'When people tell me they'll sell at $10,000' (i.redd.it) by /u/quinoa removed from /r/Bitcoin within 20-30min

When people tell me they'll sell at $10,000
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Author: quinoa
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

The Not-Future of Meat (It's not beef. It's not plant protein. It's not … a good idea.)

We live in the Year of the Faux Burger. The meatless Impossible Whopper debuted at Burger Kings across the United States in August, while McDonald’s is rolling out what it calls the P.L.T. (plant, lettuce, tomato) in Canada to see if customers bite. Beyond Meat, which makes the patty for the P.L.T., went public in May and became the hottest stock of 2019, pushing the company’s valuation well into the billions. One hedge fund manager compared the enthusiasm over fake meat to early investor frenzy over Bitcoin.
Now into this burgeoning culinary niche comes a new offering: The Blend.
It’s a dull name for a curious product. The Blend, from Tyson Foods, is made using pea protein, just like Beyond Meat’s burger. Both come in brown-and-green packaging. Both are soy-free. There is one notable difference, however, between the two products. The Blend, in contrast to Beyond Burger, contains beef. The kind from actual cows.
The Blend is a new entry in an unlikely market category that has emerged in recent months: foods that aren’t quite meat, but aren’t really not meat, either. Hormel debuted its own gastronomic mishmash earlier this year as part of the Applegate Organics line—a fake-meat/real-meat, beef-and-mushroom patty that is, confusingly enough, called The Great Organic Blend Burger. The company bragged that it had created a “mouthwatering burger that epitomizes clean labels while also catering to the growing population of flexitarians.” Applegate’s president, John Ghingo, proclaimed it a “win, win, win for conscious carnivores.”
...If you’re a conscious or conflicted carnivore, why would eating planimals—a portmanteau that so far none of these companies has embraced—be an appealing dietary solution? Tyson’s tagline for The Blend, “Don’t Change Who You Are To Improve How You Eat,” suggests that there are consumers who want a burger with fewer calories and less saturated fat but worry that eating a straight-up veggie burger would mean surrendering some essential part of their identity. It’s a slippery slope from there to playing Hacky Sack shirtless at a farmer’s market.
As a non-vegetarian who often eats veggie burgers, I’m pretty much the target demo for this brave new protein category. My fellow flexitarians and I, who make up either one-third or one-fifth of the population depending on how you count, are usually motivated by overlapping concerns about health, animal welfare, and the environment. We care about these things, but not enough to abstain entirely from consuming flesh. In theory, the in-between burger is just what we’ve been looking for.
Or at least you see how a meat-company executive could arrive at that conclusion. If all these flexitarians are up for eating veggie burgers and beef burgers, they should be extra chuffed at the prospect of eating both at the same time. A sandwich that splits the difference—finally the code has been cracked! One imagines Tyson and Hormel executives nodding at this forward-thinking pitch while nibbling contentedly on Vienna sausages. (I’m guessing this is how meat-company executives behave behind closed doors.)
If only my inner conflict were so easily assuaged. The food industry’s approach to people like me—let them eat fake and steak—misunderstands how people like me choose what to eat. We tend to approach menu decision in terms of two rival pleasures, restraint and indulgence. Part of the upside of ordering a veggie burger or a kale salad or a quinoa-and-beet pilaf is the knowledge that you’re making a more healthful and ethical choice by avoiding meat. The Blend robs you of that smug buzz. To make matters worse, you’re not experiencing the borderline religious exaltation of a truly killer cheeseburger. Instead you’re settling for a meal you can neither thoroughly enjoy nor feel good about not thoroughly enjoying. If that makes sense.
https://www.wired.com/story/the-not-future-of-meat/
submitted by improvius to atlanticdiscussions [link] [comments]

Nine Ridiculously Cheap Organic Dinners

https://preview.redd.it/igntosb1y0x01.jpg?width=650&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=1d37d9b74f713c48ed0ce199a34771cf0e617c61
We get it: Organic ingredients are effing expensive compared to their conventional counterparts. But that doesn't mean you have to settle for a plate of food you feel shitty about putting in your body—just smarten up about meal planning, instead. For example, you can swap out pricey organic meat and dairy for more cost-effective protein-packed fare like lentils, black beans, and whole grains. And never overlook the value—and time savings—you can get with buying an organic frozen meal or premade ingredients, from time to time. As you'll see from the nine dinners here, cheap and organic can actually go hand in hand: All our meals ring in at less than $5 per serving.
1) Mango, Avocado, and Black Bean Salad with Lime Dressing "Organic meats are going to be expensive; a pound of organic ground beef is roughly $7 at the supermarket," says Libby Mills, RDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. "But a can of organic black beans is a mere $2. A bag of dried organic black beans? Even cheaper."
Serves 6
2 ripe but firm avocados, pitted, peeled, and cubed3 Tbsp lime juice2 ripe but firm mangoes, pitted, peeled, and cubed1 jalapeño, stemmed, seeded, and finely chopped2 Tbsp chopped cilantro, plus more for garnish1 tsp freshly grated lime zest½ tsp sea salt¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper¼ tsp sugar3 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil1 can (15-oz) no-salt-added black beans, rinsed and drained
1. Gently toss avocado with 1 Tbsp of the lime juice in medium bowl. Add mango and jalapeño and gently toss to combine. Set aside.2. Whisk remaining 2 Tbsp lime juice, cilantro, lime zest, salt, pepper, and sugar in large bowl. Whisk in oil until thoroughly combined to make thick dressing. Add avocado mixture and black beans and toss gently. Spoon salad onto plates, garnish with cilantro and serve immediately.
(Recipe via Whole Foods Market)
2) Whole Grain Tabbouleh Salad No one thinks about whole grains as a protein source, but—surprise, surprise!—they are, with 1 cup of quinoa, oats, and even whole wheat averaging about 6 g of protein (the same amount found in an egg). Even better, organic grains are super budget-friendly. Organic quinoa costs, on average, $0.75 per 1/4 cup serving. "Buy bulk or store-brand organic grains, and prevent overbuying for a recipe by bringing your own measuring cups to the store to measure bulk ingredients," suggests Mills.
Serves 4Total Time: 35 minutes
1 c cooked quinoa, millet, or barley1¾ c vegetable broth1 lg ripe tomato, diced½ c finely chopped cucumber⅓ c chopped scallions⅓ c chopped fresh mint¼ c chopped fresh parsley and tender stems¼ c extra virgin olive oil3 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
1. Rinse quinoa in fine metal strainer until water runs clear. Transfer to medium saucepan. Add vegetable broth and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, covered, 30 minutes. Turn off heat and let stand 5 minutes. Fluff with fork. 2. Spread quinoa onto sheet pan to cool. (You can prepare quinoa a day in advance and keep chilled until ready to use.) Transfer cool quinoa to salad or mixing bowl.3. Add tomato, cucumber, scallions, mint, parsley, oil, lemon juice, and salt and pepper to taste. Stir well. Cover and chill before serving.Lentils are another plant-based protein and money-saving superstar. Organic large green lentils average about $2.49 per pound. "I love this recipe because it makes a light, yet substantial dinner in a pinch," says Mills.
Makes 2 quarts
1 c green lentils3 Tbsp olive oil2 lg stalks celery, diced2 med large carrots, peeled and diced1 lg onion, diced2 cloves garlic, minced2 tsp salt½ tsp freshly ground black pepper1 bay leaf1 qt vegetable or chicken brothPinch red-pepper flakes
1. In large pot, bring 1 qt water to a boil. Add lentils and remove from heat. Let soak for 15 minutes. Drain water and set lentils aside in bowl.2. Return same pot to stove; add oil then celery, carrots, and onion. Sauté over medium heat until vegetables are tender and onion is translucent. Add garlic, salt, pepper, and bay leaf. Cook, stirring, 1 minute.3. Add lentils and vegetable broth. Cover and simmer over low heat, 1 hour. Ensure liquid covers lentils, adding more broth if needed. Discard bay leaf before serving.4. Serve with red-pepper flakes and a dollop of sour cream.
For more summer flavor, add chard or spinach. Cut leaves into bite-size pieces, removing thick center veins. Add chard in the last 10 to 15 minutes of cooking time and the spinach in the last 5 minutes.
4) Vegan Zucchini-and-Cashew-Nut Stuffing"This recipe can be enjoyed as a main course casserole with a side of cooked asparagus and fresh garden salad," says Mills. "Or used as a stuffing to baked tomatoes, baby artichokes, or mushroom caps."
Serves 8 to 12
3 c oats2 c peeled and shredded zucchini2 c cooked quinoa2 c diced tomatoes2 c diced onions2 c vegetable broth1 c coarsely ground raw cashew nuts1 c minced fresh parsley3 garlic cloves, minced2 tsp sea salt
Mix all ingredients and pour into 13" x 9" pan lightly coated with cooking spray. Bake at 350°F for 45 to 50 minutes.
(Recipe via Libby Mills)
5) Shake and Eat SaladsAll you need is a mason jar and a good grip to shake up this organic meal. Sub in 2 to 3 tablespoons of salsa for the Honey Lime Cumin dressing to cut down on prep time and switch up the flavor.
Dressing1 Tbsp red wine vinegar2 tsp honey2 tsp fresh lime juicePinch cumin
Salad⅓ c cooked black beans or quinoa⅓ c cooked corn kernels1 Roma tomato, diced1 c chopped romaine lettuce, washed and dried
Add all ingredients to mason jar. Start with dressing ingredients, then beans, corn, and tomatoes. Add lettuce last. Chill until ready to shake and eat.
6) 365 Organic Vegetable Lasagna or Vegan Lasagna ($3.99 for 1 serving)Realistically, not everyone has time to make an elaborate, healthy meal come 8 PM. The good thing is that supermarkets like Whole Foods are stocking their freezer cases with affordable, pre-made organic dinners that are nothing like the sketchy TV dinners you ate as a kid. This lasagna is made with all organic ingredients and costs less than $4 per serving. All you need to do is heat and eat.
7) Engine 2 Plant-Strong Fiesta Blend and Wild Rice Blend ($3.99 for 3.5 servings)This brand's frozen whole-grain combos, like the Fiesta Blend and Wild Rice Blend, cost less than $1.25 per serving. Mix into salad, sautéed greens, or pair with a small piece of protein and you've got yourself a clean, well-balanced meal that's ready to eat in less than 10 minutes.
8) 365 Organic Quinoa with Vegetables ($3.99 for 2.5 servings)Quinoa does take a little while to cook, so no one will blame you for opting for a precooked batch every now and then. 365 Organic Quinoa with Vegetables is a mix of white and red quinoa, sweet potato, and zucchini. One serving rings up to about $1.50. Pair it with an organic turkey burger and dinner will still only set you back as much as one latte at Starbucks.
9) Amy's Black Bean Burrito ($2.99 for 1 serving)This quick and clean source of plant-based protein (8 g per serving) will replenish your body at the end of a rough day for less than $3. Heat it up, chow down, and bask in the glory of knowing that you could have paid for this meal with the loose change you have hanging out in the junk drawer.
Source

Cryptocurrency #ICO #Blockchain #TokenSale #agrotechfarm #Token #AI #coin #bonus #platform #bitcoin #ethereum #crypto #currencies #project #ATF #cryptotrading #icoinvest #iconews #technology #agrotechnology #ecology #organicfood #organicindustry #Dinners #Cheap #Salad #Tabbouleh #Burrito

submitted by AgroTechFarmICO to u/AgroTechFarmICO [link] [comments]

Wanna know what folks in Birmingham 'Googled' the most in 2014?

Each year, Google calculates the top trending searches worldwide and releases them in it’s annual ‘Year in Search‘ feature. By analyzing spikes in search traffic in​ ​over a trillion searches, Google’s annual list aims to reflect the topics and people that defined 2014.
In addition to analyzing what the world as a whole searched for over the past 12 months, Google also chose select cities to analyze, including Birmingham, Alabama.
​So what were the most memorable moments for the people of Birmingham? Below you’ll find the Top Trending Searches and News/Events for the Magic City and the Top Trending Questions that Birmingham needed to find the answers to in 2014.
Top-10 Trending Searches in Birmingham in 2014:
  1. Robin Williams
  2. iPhone 6
  3. Ebola
  4. World Cup
  5. Joan Rivers
  6. Philip Seymour Hoffman
  7. Tony Stewart
  8. Black Friday
  9. NFL Draft
  10. Tracy Morgan
Top-10 Trending ​People in Birmingham in 2014
  1. Robin Williams
  2. Joan Rivers
  3. Philip Seymour Hoffman
  4. Tony Stewart
  5. Tracy Morgan
  6. Ray Rice
  7. Jennifer Lawrence
  8. Donald Sterling
  9. Renee Zellweger
  10. Iggy Azalea
Top-10 How To… Questions for Birmingham in 2014
  1. how to crochet
  2. how to coupon
  3. how to draw
  4. how to kiss
  5. how to knit
  6. how to budget
  7. how to sing
  8. how to meditate
  9. how to swaddle
  10. how to applique
Top-10 What is… Questions for Birmingham in 2014
  1. what is ebola
  2. what is als
  3. what is love
  4. what is isis
  5. what is lupus
  6. what is gluten
  7. what is bitcoin
  8. what is quinoa
  9. what is uber
  10. what is msg
Top-10 News and Events for Birmingham in 2014
  1. Ebola
  2. World Cup
  3. Black Friday
  4. NFL Draft
  5. Malaysia Airlines
  6. ALS ice bucket challenge
  7. Ferguson
  8. Kentucky Derby 2014
  9. Crimea
  10. March Madness 2014
submitted by jmwbama311 to Birmingham [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: AskEconomics top posts from 2016-12-11 to 2017-12-10 16:42 PDT

Period: 363.79 days
Submissions Comments
Total 1000 9010
Rate (per day) 2.75 24.68
Unique Redditors 765 1500
Combined Score 9038 28269

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 75 points, 11 submissions: Ask_Everything
    1. How did Ireland become SO WEALTHY in spite of being hit by the Great Recession so hard? (10 points, 4 comments)
    2. Peru's economy grew by 7.8% per year since 2009. Is this due to quinoa exports? (8 points, 4 comments)
    3. Why can't employers hire 16% more employees and pay ALL of their employees 14% less in aggregare? This would make the unemployment rate 0% without adding to employer costs. (8 points, 10 comments)
    4. In the USA, an we have employee owned businesses like Bob’s Red Mill. Is there a model that allows a business to be municipal owned or partly owned by the municipality? (7 points, 3 comments)
    5. What are the best leading indicators for the economy or the stock market? (7 points, 11 comments)
    6. EITC VS Higher Minimum Wage for poverty reduction and reducing income inequality (6 points, 9 comments)
    7. How would implementing a $15/hour minimum wage NOT contribute to inflation across the board (thus negating its effect)? (6 points, 13 comments)
    8. In Communist USSR, (1) was the Gini Coefficient = ~0? (2) If everyone earned about the same amount, then was there poverty? (3) What were some economic triumphs of Communism? (6 points, 12 comments)
    9. India and China had equal Per Capita GDP (PPP) in '89. Why are all economic predictions of India so much more pessimistic about India than for China? (6 points, 4 comments)
    10. Why is there a black market for USD in developing countries? (6 points, 4 comments)
  2. 62 points, 6 submissions: VanGod21
    1. How much money could be collected with pigouvian and land/natural resource taxes in the United States? (21 points, 3 comments)
    2. Is income inequality an externality? (17 points, 16 comments)
    3. Why do private companies get the patent on drugs funded by the government? (9 points, 2 comments)
    4. Would cutting the corporate tax increase investment? (6 points, 4 comments)
    5. When is it better for the government to borrow money for spending rather than pay with taxes? (5 points, 5 comments)
    6. What are the biggest externalities in the United States? (4 points, 4 comments)
  3. 61 points, 6 submissions: BainCapitalist
    1. ACA replacement bill is out. Any changes from the original talking points that were released? (17 points, 1 comment)
    2. Examples of 'good' infrastructure plans? (12 points, 2 comments)
    3. Applications of blockchain technology? (9 points, 4 comments)
    4. Articles/ books on wartime economics? (8 points, 3 comments)
    5. Can I have a breakdown on all the major theories on the emergence of money? (8 points, 17 comments)
    6. Question about X-Tax (7 points, 6 comments)
  4. 54 points, 5 submissions: benjaminikuta
    1. Millennials are earning 20% less than boomers did at the same age in life... (19 points, 8 comments)
    2. Does marketing make society better off, or is it rent seeking? (12 points, 3 comments)
    3. The Interstate Commerce Act of 1887 regulated the railroads, forced consistent cargo rates and eliminated price discrimination between long and short haul fares. Would it be fair to describe the law as enforcing a kind of "rail neutrality"? What was the impact of the law? (8 points, 1 comment)
    4. What if instead of a ban on plastic grocery bags, there was just an extreme tax? (8 points, 20 comments)
    5. What are some examples of natural monopolies that exist or would exist without government intervention? (7 points, 25 comments)
  5. 54 points, 3 submissions: Alethean
    1. If major countries go to war, what happens to their debt obligations? (30 points, 3 comments)
    2. Does the world have a contingency plan for a Chinese recession or financial crisis? (15 points, 11 comments)
    3. Is there much risk of contagion or a reduction in aggregate demand if/when bitcoin collapses? (9 points, 4 comments)
  6. 52 points, 3 submissions: Municipal_Man
    1. What are the most profound ideas of economics in the last 20 years? (35 points, 53 comments)
    2. Where can I find the Debt of a city and the GDP of a city? (10 points, 4 comments)
    3. What are the DISADVANTAGES of the EITC? (7 points, 3 comments)
  7. 48 points, 6 submissions: zangerinus
    1. net neutrality: good or bad? (13 points, 25 comments)
    2. In the 50's a single person in the US with a decent job requiring little or even no education could provide a comfortable home, education for their children, etc etc by themselves. Why were they paid so much or why hasn't that pay transitioned to 2017? (9 points, 9 comments)
    3. Best behavioral economics textbook? (7 points, 5 comments)
    4. Will US debt be a problem in the future? (7 points, 13 comments)
    5. Books/sources on Public Choice theory? (6 points, 2 comments)
    6. How to help third world countries? Why is foreign aid controversial among economists? (6 points, 10 comments)
  8. 48 points, 4 submissions: dewarr
    1. If the USSR was so ineffecient, how was it such a superpower? (21 points, 24 comments)
    2. Is Schrumpeter's "Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy" remotely approachable for a relative layperson? (11 points, 5 comments)
    3. Good history of economics textbook? (9 points, 5 comments)
    4. Does the concept of economic utility stem from ethical utiliarianism? (7 points, 6 comments)
  9. 46 points, 5 submissions: jomdo
    1. Does the U.S. have a different definition than the rest of the world, in regards to what exactly "Middle Class" is? (13 points, 14 comments)
    2. What are some fictional books that appears to have a realistic running economy- looking for books where one would later go back and say, "Hey maybe this happened because of ----" (10 points, 0 comments)
    3. What are some economic indicators of corruption? (9 points, 7 comments)
    4. Does anyone have a source that compares the income of every nation's lowest quintile? (8 points, 0 comments)
    5. How is it that there are modern nations with more income inequality than the Roman Empire (based on a study published by Cambridge) (6 points, 12 comments)
  10. 43 points, 5 submissions: neoliberalQuestions
    1. Is unilateral free trade as beneficial as bi/multilateral free trade agreements? Are there greater costs to it compared with other free trade arrangements? [x-post from /AskSocialScience] (11 points, 5 comments)
    2. How much contribution does healthcare make to health outcomes in the US compared with other factors like lifestyle, diet, environment, etc.? How does the US's mix of factors compare to those of other developed countries? (10 points, 2 comments)
    3. In the US, certain localities have short-run reduced employment prospects due to positive productivity shocks (automation, trade, etc.). What frictions/market failures prevent workers in these places from retraining themselves and moving away? (10 points, 6 comments)
    4. Is market power as little a problem (and anti-trust as ineffective at promoting consumer welfare) as depicted in this Econtalk podcast with Don Bourdreaux? (7 points, 10 comments)
    5. How might relatively low income localities mitigate the effects of a high national minimum wage? (5 points, 9 comments)
  11. 40 points, 4 submissions: CarltonFrater
    1. Am I crazy for wanting to be an economist? (13 points, 13 comments)
    2. Would a Masters Degree in Economics be a good choice for me? (11 points, 14 comments)
    3. Will Automation Lead to Drastic Unemployment and a Depression as some Speculate? (10 points, 14 comments)
    4. What is the relation between government spending as a percentage of GDP? (6 points, 1 comment)
  12. 37 points, 5 submissions: MTGTCG
    1. Which country has the best policies and institutions in place for economic growth? (11 points, 6 comments)
    2. What problems do mainstream economists have with libertarian beliefs? (9 points, 9 comments)
    3. Foreign Aid to the 3rd World (6 points, 4 comments)
    4. Intellectual Property, is it needed? (6 points, 2 comments)
    5. What is the best way to design the tax system if the goal is GDP growth? (5 points, 24 comments)
  13. 36 points, 4 submissions: Semaug
    1. What sort of impacts will Trump's proposed tariffs have on the economy? (13 points, 6 comments)
    2. Did economists see the 2008 recession coming? (10 points, 5 comments)
    3. What percentage of Venezuela's economy is run by the state(SOEs)? (7 points, 4 comments)
    4. Does the US spend a disproportionate amount on drug R&D compared to other countries? If so, is this related to the lack of price control? (6 points, 1 comment)
  14. 36 points, 4 submissions: rishijoesanu
    1. How do economists price carbon? (12 points, 14 comments)
    2. Can someone ELI5 Amartya Sen's Liberal Paradox? (10 points, 5 comments)
    3. Does automation cause Job loss in the long run? Thoughts on the new Kurzgesagt video? (9 points, 34 comments)
    4. What aspects of Ray Dalio's video "How The Economic Machine Works" is wrong or oversimplified? (5 points, 0 comments)
  15. 35 points, 5 submissions: remarkablecereal
    1. If people find a cheap way to make near unlimited amounts of gold, would the money backed by gold become worthless? (11 points, 10 comments)
    2. Is the "robot" revolution different this time? (7 points, 1 comment)
    3. When misers hoard wealth, can the market pretend it doesn't exist? (6 points, 11 comments)
    4. Why is war expensive? (6 points, 22 comments)
    5. Why is labour cheaper in developing countries? (5 points, 6 comments)
  16. 35 points, 2 submissions: Jyan
    1. Why tax brackets, rather than a smooth increase? (22 points, 8 comments)
    2. Judea Pearl wrote that "men were more qualified than equally paid women", in contrast to the usual statement on gender inequality. Is anyone aware of a citation? (13 points, 1 comment)
  17. 35 points, 2 submissions: Paul_2
    1. Is "Basic Economics" by Thomas Sowell reliable? (25 points, 3 comments)
    2. What is the standard of proof in economics? (10 points, 10 comments)
  18. 35 points, 1 submission: PM_ME_MESSY_BUNS
    1. /memenomics posts aside, is Ben Bernanke really a hero? Did the Fed save us from something much worse during the recession? How bad would it have been if the Fed acted as poorly and lamely as it did before/during the Great Depression? (35 points, 5 comments)
  19. 33 points, 2 submissions: johnfrance
    1. Most important books or papers in economics published since 2000? (27 points, 5 comments)
    2. Looking for good secondary literature on Ricardo, and JS Mill? (6 points, 2 comments)
  20. 33 points, 1 submission: papermarioguy02
    1. What parts of Friedman's "The Role of Monetary Policy" are now part of the economic consensus? (33 points, 1 comment)

Top Commenters

  1. zzzzz94 (2400 points, 299 comments)
  2. RobThorpe (1525 points, 515 comments)
  3. MrDannyOcean (1401 points, 185 comments)
  4. he3-1 (599 points, 65 comments)
  5. riggorous (534 points, 178 comments)
  6. generated_regressor (487 points, 131 comments)
  7. Petros557 (450 points, 112 comments)
  8. Integralds (432 points, 59 comments)
  9. ZerexTheCool (407 points, 99 comments)
  10. whyrat (394 points, 116 comments)
  11. Randy_Newman1502 (385 points, 80 comments)
  12. Cutlasss (369 points, 79 comments)
  13. isntanywhere (349 points, 93 comments)
  14. Cross_Keynesian (347 points, 59 comments)
  15. King_Freedom (339 points, 109 comments)
  16. themcattacker (321 points, 115 comments)
  17. IDontGiveAFuckDude (269 points, 78 comments)
  18. Greenhorn24 (266 points, 91 comments)
  19. jmo10 (240 points, 72 comments)
  20. panick21 (227 points, 108 comments)
  21. say_wot_again (203 points, 36 comments)
  22. bon_pain (174 points, 49 comments)
  23. UpsideVII (164 points, 37 comments)
  24. gorbachev (164 points, 27 comments)
  25. VodkaHaze (153 points, 33 comments)
  26. Yankee9204 (151 points, 33 comments)
  27. Hypers0nic (146 points, 33 comments)
  28. adam7684 (131 points, 21 comments)
  29. Philosopher013 (128 points, 38 comments)
  30. FinancialEconomist (127 points, 26 comments)
  31. loaengineer0 (123 points, 26 comments)
  32. neoliberalQuestions (121 points, 33 comments)
  33. Cystee (115 points, 33 comments)
  34. a_s_h_e_n (110 points, 31 comments)
  35. Frexican (106 points, 25 comments)
  36. ManWithAMasterplan (106 points, 18 comments)
  37. brberg (103 points, 22 comments)
  38. MiltonFriedom (102 points, 32 comments)
  39. Rimshotsgalore (100 points, 31 comments)
  40. HeFlipYa (97 points, 33 comments)
  41. VineFynn (96 points, 18 comments)
  42. electrodraco (94 points, 10 comments)
  43. MrCava (90 points, 26 comments)
  44. WikiTextBot (86 points, 50 comments)
  45. wumbotarian (86 points, 16 comments)
  46. Holophonist (85 points, 13 comments)
  47. MaesterMagoo (79 points, 26 comments)
  48. FatBabyGiraffe (77 points, 19 comments)
  49. badbooksaintbad (76 points, 17 comments)
  50. econ_learner (76 points, 15 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. Is there even one economist in here that thinks Trump's protectionist agenda will result in welfare gains for the American people? by deleted (38 points, 39 comments)
  2. What are the most profound ideas of economics in the last 20 years? by Municipal_Man (35 points, 53 comments)
  3. /memenomics posts aside, is Ben Bernanke really a hero? Did the Fed save us from something much worse during the recession? How bad would it have been if the Fed acted as poorly and lamely as it did before/during the Great Depression? by PM_ME_MESSY_BUNS (35 points, 5 comments)
  4. What parts of Friedman's "The Role of Monetary Policy" are now part of the economic consensus? by papermarioguy02 (33 points, 1 comment)
  5. Maybe a dumb question but, If we're so good at producing efficiently why can't more people live in a single income? by thebshwckr (30 points, 33 comments)
  6. My friend recently published this - help me prank him by gosick (30 points, 11 comments)
  7. If major countries go to war, what happens to their debt obligations? by Alethean (30 points, 3 comments)
  8. What programming language should an Economist learn? by MrEconomist206 (29 points, 61 comments)
  9. What is it really like to be an economist? by ListenAndObserve (28 points, 5 comments)
  10. Why does Marxism seem to be so much more prevalent in philosophical circles than in economic ones? by Oedium (27 points, 36 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 85 points: zzzzz94's comment in Can anyone explain why Austrian Economics is so unpopular?
  2. 67 points: say_wot_again's comment in Who hates Milton Friedman most?
  3. 45 points: he3-1's comment in Why does Marxism seem to be so much more prevalent in philosophical circles than in economic ones?
  4. 41 points: MrDannyOcean's comment in What is an economists opinion on Libertarianism?
  5. 39 points: he3-1's comment in How can I learn enough about economics to make informed voting decisions?
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[uncensored-r/Bitcoin] When people tell me they'll sell at $10,000

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Cereal, a Taste of Nostalgia, Looks for Its Next Chapter

NYT - https://archive.is/AdvGg
King Vitaman and I were tight when I was young. Sweetened cereals were a rarity in my house, so beating my siblings to breakfast was the only way to make sure the king and I would have some time together.
I got up early to follow his animated adventures on the back of the box. Even the ingredient list, with its parade of unintelligible words and the promise of a full day’s supply of vitamins and iron, seemed endlessly fascinating. I was rapt until the bowl was empty and his sugarcoated golden crowns had turned the milk to syrup.
Now, I watch my young daughter stare at her cereal box in the morning, pondering a stalk of organic wheat or the plight of a koala. I wonder if she will ever have the sentimental pleasure of her own King Vitaman.
Breakfast cereal is a powerful engine of nostalgia — the warm, helpful kind, not the morose, depressive kind. The relationship starts with babies, who use Cheerios like Bitcoin, and stretches into old age. Almost half of all American baby boomers and nearly 40 percent of the generation born before them say the cereals they loved as children remain their favorites, according to an August 2015 report by Mintel, the global market research company.
But breakfast cereal, both as a cultural marker and a profit center, is at a crossroads. Since the late 1990s, its popularity has been slowly fading. Sales, which totaled $13.9 billion in 2000, dipped last year to about $10 billion.
Younger consumers are not as attached to cold cereal for breakfast as their forebears, analysts and cereal makers agree. They either don’t eat breakfast at all, or eat it somewhere other than home. And when they do eat breakfast, a bowl of cold cereal is often replaced by hot grains, smoothies, yogurt or breakfast sandwiches.
Some analysts, like Euromonitor, predict that cereal will continue its slide, while others, like Packaged Facts, are forecasting a turnaround. So are the big cereal producers. This month, John A. Bryant, the Kellogg Company’s chief executive, predicted that its cereal sales in the United States would actually grow by 1 or 2 percent this year.
Although breakfast cereal seems simple enough, fitting the right one with the right customer has become a challenge in an age of niche preferences, when even the specific grain and where it came from are critical to shoppers.
“The cereal category is certainly shifting,” said Melissa Abbott, director of culinary insights for the Hartman Group, a consumer food research organization. “Consumers over all are less interested in industrially processed grains as a meaningful start to their day.”
Some organic and other brands perceived as more healthful are selling well, so General Mills has added three organic cereals to its Annie’s line of children’s foods. By April, it hopes to introduce Frosted Oat Flakes, Berry Bunnies and Cocoa Bunnies in Whole Foods stores.
Kellogg’s, which Mr. Bryant told investors this month had not always been on top of consumer tastes, is banking on a better mix of healthful cereals. It has just introduced a Nourish line of Special K with quinoa, and is looking at ways to repackage cereal into single servings and more eco-friendly bags.
The dream of all these companies is to capture the all-powerful and elusive millennial eater, who just isn’t all that into cereal for breakfast. It’s just too much work, for one thing. Almost 40 percent of the millennials surveyed by Mintel for its 2015 report said cereal was an inconvenient breakfast choice because they had to clean up after eating it.
In the college cafeteria, eating any cereal you want for three meals a day is no longer a rite of passage. Bon Appétit Management Company, the California food service firm whose clients include tech giants like Google and more than 100 college campuses, said other options were preferred at breakfast. Locally made granola, protein bars and hot cereals like congee or oatmeal are popular.
The cold cereals that baby boomers grew up on have been relegated to a category called “comfort brands,” and Bon Appétit offers only a couple of choices on its traditional cafeteria lines. At Emory University in Atlanta, it’s Raisin Bran and Lucky Charms. Cheerios are served not because everyone has loved them since childhood, but because they are gluten free. The organic offering is Kashi Sweet Potato Sunshine. (At other places on campus, the company does sell a wider array of cereals like Frosted Flakes and
Still, this generation of young people may be the ones who save cereal. But it probably won’t be because they are eating it for breakfast, or because they are moved by vague claims of health, nutrition or environmental impact. Millennials are snackers, and not easily fooled by packaging or advertising, but they are as nostalgia-driven as any group of cereal eaters.
“I literally had three bowls of cereal for dinner last night,” said Christina Tosi, the New York pastry chef who founded the Milk Bar cafes and made the milk left in the bottom of a cereal bowl a culinary phenomenon by turning it into ice cream. She is a big fan of Lucky Charms and Frosted Flakes.
Ms. Tosi, 34, could be considered either a member of Generation X or a millennial. Like many people her age, she thinks of cereal more as a creative outlet or a way to dip into the past than as breakfast.
Since the business began slumping in the 1990s, cereal companies have been trying to position cereal as something other than breakfast, putting it into crackers and snack bars. But Ms. Tosi, who consults for Kellogg’s, said they haven’t exploited all the various ways cereal is being used.
“They have to embrace that people love the flavor and texture of cereal and the vintage nature, but it’s not about breakfast,” Ms. Tosi said.
Ms. Tosi is not the first to play with cereal in the professional kitchen. A decade ago, the chef Ferran Adrià of the innovative El Bulli restaurant in Spain poured a rich reduced seafood broth over Rice Krispies for a dish called Kellogg’s paella.
Off-market uses for cereal have seemed to accelerate recently. Last year, the Bedrock Fizz at the Eddy restaurant developed a fan base among young New Yorkers who appreciated a $16 cocktail infused with Fruity Pebbles. Trisha Yearwood, the country singer who is also a cooking celebrity, created a cocktail in which she infused milk with Cinnamon Toast Crunch cereal and mixed it with Fireball Cinnamon Whisky.
Cereal manufacturers are starting to catch on. Recently, Kellogg paid a young, culturally diverse group of chefs to create dishes using its cereals. Among them was Danny Bowien, the man behind Mission Chinese Food in New York and San Francisco, and a lifelong Corn Flakes fan. For a special breakfast menu he served in December, Mr. Bowien matched Frosted Flakes with matcha milk and green tea powder, and poured bacon-infused soy milk over Corn Pops, topping the dish with a fried egg.
Fancy cocktails and cutting-edge cuisine may not do much to budge sales figures. But the chefs may lend breakfast cereal some needed cachet — and visibility — if only by eating it.
Kyle Mendenhall, the executive chef of the Kitchen, a restaurant group in Boulder, Colo., likes to pour cream or whole milk over Honey Nut Cheerios, the nation’s top-selling brand.
“Every chef is probably a cereal guy,” he said, “because 90 percent of them go home at 2 in the morning and eat what’s there because they don’t want to cook anymore.”
See Also: Junk Food Junkie - http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xw94y9_junk-food-junkie-best-of-the-bar-bands_music
submitted by ShaunaDorothy to nutrition [link] [comments]

Cereal, a Taste of Nostalgia, Looks for Its Next Chapter

NYT - https://archive.is/AdvGg
King Vitaman and I were tight when I was young. Sweetened cereals were a rarity in my house, so beating my siblings to breakfast was the only way to make sure the king and I would have some time together.
I got up early to follow his animated adventures on the back of the box. Even the ingredient list, with its parade of unintelligible words and the promise of a full day’s supply of vitamins and iron, seemed endlessly fascinating. I was rapt until the bowl was empty and his sugarcoated golden crowns had turned the milk to syrup.
Now, I watch my young daughter stare at her cereal box in the morning, pondering a stalk of organic wheat or the plight of a koala. I wonder if she will ever have the sentimental pleasure of her own King Vitaman.
Breakfast cereal is a powerful engine of nostalgia — the warm, helpful kind, not the morose, depressive kind. The relationship starts with babies, who use Cheerios like Bitcoin, and stretches into old age. Almost half of all American baby boomers and nearly 40 percent of the generation born before them say the cereals they loved as children remain their favorites, according to an August 2015 report by Mintel, the global market research company.
But breakfast cereal, both as a cultural marker and a profit center, is at a crossroads. Since the late 1990s, its popularity has been slowly fading. Sales, which totaled $13.9 billion in 2000, dipped last year to about $10 billion.
Younger consumers are not as attached to cold cereal for breakfast as their forebears, analysts and cereal makers agree. They either don’t eat breakfast at all, or eat it somewhere other than home. And when they do eat breakfast, a bowl of cold cereal is often replaced by hot grains, smoothies, yogurt or breakfast sandwiches.
Some analysts, like Euromonitor, predict that cereal will continue its slide, while others, like Packaged Facts, are forecasting a turnaround. So are the big cereal producers. This month, John A. Bryant, the Kellogg Company’s chief executive, predicted that its cereal sales in the United States would actually grow by 1 or 2 percent this year.
Although breakfast cereal seems simple enough, fitting the right one with the right customer has become a challenge in an age of niche preferences, when even the specific grain and where it came from are critical to shoppers.
“The cereal category is certainly shifting,” said Melissa Abbott, director of culinary insights for the Hartman Group, a consumer food research organization. “Consumers over all are less interested in industrially processed grains as a meaningful start to their day.”
Some organic and other brands perceived as more healthful are selling well, so General Mills has added three organic cereals to its Annie’s line of children’s foods. By April, it hopes to introduce Frosted Oat Flakes, Berry Bunnies and Cocoa Bunnies in Whole Foods stores.
Kellogg’s, which Mr. Bryant told investors this month had not always been on top of consumer tastes, is banking on a better mix of healthful cereals. It has just introduced a Nourish line of Special K with quinoa, and is looking at ways to repackage cereal into single servings and more eco-friendly bags.
The dream of all these companies is to capture the all-powerful and elusive millennial eater, who just isn’t all that into cereal for breakfast. It’s just too much work, for one thing. Almost 40 percent of the millennials surveyed by Mintel for its 2015 report said cereal was an inconvenient breakfast choice because they had to clean up after eating it.
In the college cafeteria, eating any cereal you want for three meals a day is no longer a rite of passage. Bon Appétit Management Company, the California food service firm whose clients include tech giants like Google and more than 100 college campuses, said other options were preferred at breakfast. Locally made granola, protein bars and hot cereals like congee or oatmeal are popular.
The cold cereals that baby boomers grew up on have been relegated to a category called “comfort brands,” and Bon Appétit offers only a couple of choices on its traditional cafeteria lines. At Emory University in Atlanta, it’s Raisin Bran and Lucky Charms. Cheerios are served not because everyone has loved them since childhood, but because they are gluten free. The organic offering is Kashi Sweet Potato Sunshine. (At other places on campus, the company does sell a wider array of cereals like Frosted Flakes and
Still, this generation of young people may be the ones who save cereal. But it probably won’t be because they are eating it for breakfast, or because they are moved by vague claims of health, nutrition or environmental impact. Millennials are snackers, and not easily fooled by packaging or advertising, but they are as nostalgia-driven as any group of cereal eaters.
“I literally had three bowls of cereal for dinner last night,” said Christina Tosi, the New York pastry chef who founded the Milk Bar cafes and made the milk left in the bottom of a cereal bowl a culinary phenomenon by turning it into ice cream. She is a big fan of Lucky Charms and Frosted Flakes.
Ms. Tosi, 34, could be considered either a member of Generation X or a millennial. Like many people her age, she thinks of cereal more as a creative outlet or a way to dip into the past than as breakfast.
Since the business began slumping in the 1990s, cereal companies have been trying to position cereal as something other than breakfast, putting it into crackers and snack bars. But Ms. Tosi, who consults for Kellogg’s, said they haven’t exploited all the various ways cereal is being used.
“They have to embrace that people love the flavor and texture of cereal and the vintage nature, but it’s not about breakfast,” Ms. Tosi said.
Ms. Tosi is not the first to play with cereal in the professional kitchen. A decade ago, the chef Ferran Adrià of the innovative El Bulli restaurant in Spain poured a rich reduced seafood broth over Rice Krispies for a dish called Kellogg’s paella.
Off-market uses for cereal have seemed to accelerate recently. Last year, the Bedrock Fizz at the Eddy restaurant developed a fan base among young New Yorkers who appreciated a $16 cocktail infused with Fruity Pebbles. Trisha Yearwood, the country singer who is also a cooking celebrity, created a cocktail in which she infused milk with Cinnamon Toast Crunch cereal and mixed it with Fireball Cinnamon Whisky.
Cereal manufacturers are starting to catch on. Recently, Kellogg paid a young, culturally diverse group of chefs to create dishes using its cereals. Among them was Danny Bowien, the man behind Mission Chinese Food in New York and San Francisco, and a lifelong Corn Flakes fan. For a special breakfast menu he served in December, Mr. Bowien matched Frosted Flakes with matcha milk and green tea powder, and poured bacon-infused soy milk over Corn Pops, topping the dish with a fried egg.
Fancy cocktails and cutting-edge cuisine may not do much to budge sales figures. But the chefs may lend breakfast cereal some needed cachet — and visibility — if only by eating it.
Kyle Mendenhall, the executive chef of the Kitchen, a restaurant group in Boulder, Colo., likes to pour cream or whole milk over Honey Nut Cheerios, the nation’s top-selling brand.
“Every chef is probably a cereal guy,” he said, “because 90 percent of them go home at 2 in the morning and eat what’s there because they don’t want to cook anymore.”
See Also: Junk Food Junkie - http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xw94y9_junk-food-junkie-best-of-the-bar-bands_music
submitted by ShaunaDorothy to AnythingGoesHealth [link] [comments]

#SunnyHealthFitness Guide: Protein-Packed Power Quinoa Salad Recipe #Quinoa #Healthy Food Review : Fiesta Quinoa ( Season's Choice ) CHOFAN DE QUINOA EMOLIENTE PAANO MAGLUTO NG TORTANG SARDINAS/HOW TO COOK TORTANG SARDINAS/TIPID ULAM TIPS/LUTONG SARDINAS

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#SunnyHealthFitness Guide: Protein-Packed Power Quinoa Salad Recipe #Quinoa #Healthy

CHOFAN DE QUINOA rubia gray. Loading... Unsubscribe from rubia gray? ... Banking on Bitcoin YouTube Movies. 2017 · Documentary; 1:23:41. Teen Wolf YouTube Movies. 1985 · Comedy; How To Pay Off Your Mortgage Fast Using Velocity Banking How To Pay Off Your Mortgage In 5-7 Years - Duration: 41:34. Think Wealthy with Mike Adams 686,896 views Protein-Packed Power Quinoa Salad Recipe This protein-packed quinoa salad makes for an easy snack or meal. Meal prep a big batch to have on hand to eat throughout the week. ... Banking on Bitcoin ... 🔴 Jack Dorsey interview: Bitcoin BTC Event & Twitter news updates [April 29, 2020] Twitter 2,017 watching Live now Black Bean and Rice Burger Patties - Meatless Monday - Martha Stewart ... High Protein n fibre food. It also controls Weight loss.Specially for Diabetic people n all age group people.Do try Everyone tq.

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