Top 10 Richest Bitcoin Owners Over The Years | UseTheBitcoin

TIL that FBI maintains a bitcoin wallet. The wallet comprises of bitcoins that FBI has seized from many sources. After the arrest of Ross William Ulbricht, the person behind Silk Road, all his Bitcoins were confiscated. This made FBI the holder of the largest wallet of bitcoins in the world.

TIL that FBI maintains a bitcoin wallet. The wallet comprises of bitcoins that FBI has seized from many sources. After the arrest of Ross William Ulbricht, the person behind Silk Road, all his Bitcoins were confiscated. This made FBI the holder of the largest wallet of bitcoins in the world. submitted by pingpong2019 to interestingasfuck [link] [comments]

FBI is global stakeholder in cryptocurrency, currently owns largest bitcoin wallet

FBI is global stakeholder in cryptocurrency, currently owns largest bitcoin wallet submitted by CryptoJunky to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

FBI has largest Bitcoin Wallet? Can someone shed some light?

I am very new to cryptocurrencies, and was reading about the Silk Road seizure of bitcoin wallets. What I don't understand is how they can access those wallets without the "private key"? Without both the public and private key, aren't the coins basically gone forever?
submitted by TheWeetodd to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Why The FBI Seized The World's Largest Bitcoin Wallet

Why The FBI Seized The World's Largest Bitcoin Wallet submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

FBI has largest Bitcoin Wallet? Can someone shed some light? /r/Bitcoin

FBI has largest Bitcoin Wallet? Can someone shed some light? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

FBI is global stakeholder in cryptocurrency, currently owns largest bitcoin wallet

FBI is global stakeholder in cryptocurrency, currently owns largest bitcoin wallet submitted by platypusmusic to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

FBI is global stakeholder in cryptocurrency, currently owns largest bitcoin wallet

submitted by rssr to test16 [link] [comments]

Weekly Crypto News — July, 03

What important crypto events happened last week?
Regulation, Government, Mass Adoption
📌 The U.S. court classified Coinbase as a traditional bank after the exchange revealed its customer information at the request of the FBI. This decision was made when considering the appeal of Richard Gratkowski, sentenced to 5 years and 10 months in prison. Earlier, the FBI found out that between June 2016 and May 2017, Richard Gratkovsky used Bitcoins to purchase prohibited pornographic materials involving minors. Having detected the wallets used by him, the agency turned to Coinbase with a request to disclose information about this client. The exchange complied with this requirement without a court order.
📌 Binance Exchange has confirmed the launch of a cryptocurrency debit card in partnership with Swipe. Information about this appeared on the official website of the company but later disappeared. One of the features of the card will be the ability to exchange cryptocurrencies for fiat money in real-time. Users will be able to transfer money to the card directly from the Binance trading account. Payments will be instant, funds can be spent immediately after crediting. In addition, cardholders will be able to withdraw cash from ATMs.
📌 The District of Columbia Bar has allowed lawyers in Washington D.C. to accept payments in Bitcoins and other cryptocurrencies. Representatives of the organization noted that cryptocurrencies are rapidly gaining popularity as a means of payment and lawyers cannot stand aside from these changes. Acceptance of payment in crypto is permissible if the lawyer is able to ensure the safe storage of assets. To do this, he must have basic knowledge in the field of blockchain.
Projects, Collaborations, Startups
📌 BlockFi, a company operating in the cryptocurrency lending market, reported a doubling of monthly revenue in the second quarter. The driver was halving and launching a mobile application. “By now, monthly income has quadrupled since the end of last year and doubled if we start from the end of March,” said Zac Prince, co-founder, and CEO of the startup.
📌 CoinGecko, an analytical service, has announced a partnership with cybersecurity company Hacken. As part of the collaboration, CoinGecko integrated into the so-called Trust Score cryptocurrency exchange security assessment metrics based on the platform data from Hacken. Among others, Hacken considers platform infrastructure security, including server security, two-factor user authentication, spam and phishing protection, and other criteria.
📌 According to Messari, the market capitalization of dollar-tied stablecoin Tether (USDT) reached $10.3 billion. The growth since the beginning of the year, when the figure was $4.76 billion, exceeded 116%. Other stablecoins are significantly inferior to USDT in terms of market supply.
📌 Binance cryptocurrency exchange has completed a major update of the trading engine, increasing the processing speed of operations by 10 times, company CEO Changpeng Zhao said. According to him, the update was the largest in the history of Binance. It took two years to develop it. Zhao noted that in doing so, the exchange is preparing the “next wave” of cryptocurrency market growth.
Blockchain
📌 According to Messari, Bitcoin and Ethereum account for more than 99% of the commissions received by all miners. Over the past 24 hours, the total amount of commissions in the Bitcoin network has amounted to $407,571. Ethereum has a significantly higher rate — $814,082.
📌 On June 30, at block # 637 056 in the Bitcoin network, the planned recalculation of mining complexity took place. The indicator has undergone the most insignificant change since March 22, 2010, having decreased by 0.0033% from 15.7847 T to 15.7842 T. Thus, the complexity of mining Bitcoin almost did not change for the first time in 10 years.
📌 A transaction of 101 857 BTC (~$ 933 million at the time of sending) was recorded in the Bitcoin network between anonymous addresses. Transaction passed between anonymous addresses. The commission was only 48 cents. An anonymous whale used the SegWit protocol, which reduced costs by 41%.
📌 One of the Bitcoin users included the message “Hello, Noah! Welcome to the world, little one” in one of the transactions, thus recording the birth of their first child. The unchanging and censorship-resistant nature of Bitcoin will ensure that this message remains forever on the blockchain while it continues to function. The current case demonstrates a widely discussed scenario for using the first cryptocurrency as a decentralized database.
Hacking, Cyber Crimes
📌 Russian Sergei Medvedev admitted involvement in the cybercriminal organization Infraud, which traded stolen personal data, compromised credit cards, malware, and other illegal things. “Over the course of its seven-year history, Infraud caused an estimated loss of about $2.2 billion and more than $568 million in actual losses to a wide range of financial institutions, sellers and individuals,” the US Department of Justice declared.
📌 The criminals received a $1.14 million ransom after a successful attack on the University of California. The software installed by hackers encrypted the data on the university’s servers at the School of Medicine, making the information temporarily unavailable. To fix the problem, the institution had to pay 116.4 BTC.
📌 An unknown hacker managed to withdraw $500,000 in altcoins WETH, WBTC, SNX, and LINK from the pool of the Balancer Labs DeFi project using a smart contract vulnerability that allowed an attacker to create a shortage of funds in the pools.

That’s all for now! For more details follow us on Twitter, subscribe to our YouTube channel, join our Telegram.
submitted by CoinjoyAssistant to btc [link] [comments]

Weekly Crypto News — July, 03

What important crypto events happened last week?
Regulation, Government, Mass Adoption
📌 The U.S. court classified Coinbase as a traditional bank after the exchange revealed its customer information at the request of the FBI. This decision was made when considering the appeal of Richard Gratkowski, sentenced to 5 years and 10 months in prison. Earlier, the FBI found out that between June 2016 and May 2017, Richard Gratkovsky used Bitcoins to purchase prohibited pornographic materials involving minors. Having detected the wallets used by him, the agency turned to Coinbase with a request to disclose information about this client. The exchange complied with this requirement without a court order.
📌 Binance Exchange has confirmed the launch of a cryptocurrency debit card in partnership with Swipe. Information about this appeared on the official website of the company but later disappeared. One of the features of the card will be the ability to exchange cryptocurrencies for fiat money in real-time. Users will be able to transfer money to the card directly from the Binance trading account. Payments will be instant, funds can be spent immediately after crediting. In addition, cardholders will be able to withdraw cash from ATMs.
📌 The District of Columbia Bar has allowed lawyers in Washington D.C. to accept payments in Bitcoins and other cryptocurrencies. Representatives of the organization noted that cryptocurrencies are rapidly gaining popularity as a means of payment and lawyers cannot stand aside from these changes. Acceptance of payment in crypto is permissible if the lawyer is able to ensure the safe storage of assets. To do this, he must have basic knowledge in the field of blockchain.
Projects, Collaborations, Startups
📌 BlockFi, a company operating in the cryptocurrency lending market, reported a doubling of monthly revenue in the second quarter. The driver was halving and launching a mobile application. “By now, monthly income has quadrupled since the end of last year and doubled if we start from the end of March,” said Zac Prince, co-founder, and CEO of the startup.
📌 CoinGecko, an analytical service, has announced a partnership with cybersecurity company Hacken. As part of the collaboration, CoinGecko integrated into the so-called Trust Score cryptocurrency exchange security assessment metrics based on the platform data from Hacken. Among others, Hacken considers platform infrastructure security, including server security, two-factor user authentication, spam and phishing protection, and other criteria.
📌 According to Messari, the market capitalization of dollar-tied stablecoin Tether (USDT) reached $10.3 billion. The growth since the beginning of the year, when the figure was $4.76 billion, exceeded 116%. Other stablecoins are significantly inferior to USDT in terms of market supply.
📌 Binance cryptocurrency exchange has completed a major update of the trading engine, increasing the processing speed of operations by 10 times, company CEO Changpeng Zhao said. According to him, the update was the largest in the history of Binance. It took two years to develop it. Zhao noted that in doing so, the exchange is preparing the “next wave” of cryptocurrency market growth.
Blockchain
📌 According to Messari, Bitcoin and Ethereum account for more than 99% of the commissions received by all miners. Over the past 24 hours, the total amount of commissions in the Bitcoin network has amounted to $407,571. Ethereum has a significantly higher rate — $814,082.
📌 On June 30, at block # 637 056 in the Bitcoin network, the planned recalculation of mining complexity took place. The indicator has undergone the most insignificant change since March 22, 2010, having decreased by 0.0033% from 15.7847 T to 15.7842 T. Thus, the complexity of mining Bitcoin almost did not change for the first time in 10 years.
📌 A transaction of 101 857 BTC (~$ 933 million at the time of sending) was recorded in the Bitcoin network between anonymous addresses. Transaction passed between anonymous addresses. The commission was only 48 cents. An anonymous whale used the SegWit protocol, which reduced costs by 41%.
📌 One of the Bitcoin users included the message “Hello, Noah! Welcome to the world, little one” in one of the transactions, thus recording the birth of their first child. The unchanging and censorship-resistant nature of Bitcoin will ensure that this message remains forever on the blockchain while it continues to function. The current case demonstrates a widely discussed scenario for using the first cryptocurrency as a decentralized database.
Hacking, Cyber Crimes
📌 Russian Sergei Medvedev admitted involvement in the cybercriminal organization Infraud, which traded stolen personal data, compromised credit cards, malware, and other illegal things. “Over the course of its seven-year history, Infraud caused an estimated loss of about $2.2 billion and more than $568 million in actual losses to a wide range of financial institutions, sellers and individuals,” the US Department of Justice declared.
📌 The criminals received a $1.14 million ransom after a successful attack on the University of California. The software installed by hackers encrypted the data on the university’s servers at the School of Medicine, making the information temporarily unavailable. To fix the problem, the institution had to pay 116.4 BTC.
📌 An unknown hacker managed to withdraw $500,000 in altcoins WETH, WBTC, SNX, and LINK from the pool of the Balancer Labs DeFi project using a smart contract vulnerability that allowed an attacker to create a shortage of funds in the pools.

That’s all for now! For more details follow us on Twitter, subscribe to our YouTube channel, join our Telegram.
submitted by CoinjoyAssistant to CryptoMarkets [link] [comments]

Weekly Crypto News — July, 03

What important crypto events happened last week?
Regulation, Government, Mass Adoption
📌 The U.S. court classified Coinbase as a traditional bank after the exchange revealed its customer information at the request of the FBI. This decision was made when considering the appeal of Richard Gratkowski, sentenced to 5 years and 10 months in prison. Earlier, the FBI found out that between June 2016 and May 2017, Richard Gratkovsky used Bitcoins to purchase prohibited pornographic materials involving minors. Having detected the wallets used by him, the agency turned to Coinbase with a request to disclose information about this client. The exchange complied with this requirement without a court order.
📌 Binance Exchange has confirmed the launch of a cryptocurrency debit card in partnership with Swipe. Information about this appeared on the official website of the company but later disappeared. One of the features of the card will be the ability to exchange cryptocurrencies for fiat money in real-time. Users will be able to transfer money to the card directly from the Binance trading account. Payments will be instant, funds can be spent immediately after crediting. In addition, cardholders will be able to withdraw cash from ATMs.
📌 The District of Columbia Bar has allowed lawyers in Washington D.C. to accept payments in Bitcoins and other cryptocurrencies. Representatives of the organization noted that cryptocurrencies are rapidly gaining popularity as a means of payment and lawyers cannot stand aside from these changes. Acceptance of payment in crypto is permissible if the lawyer is able to ensure the safe storage of assets. To do this, he must have basic knowledge in the field of blockchain.
Projects, Collaborations, Startups
📌 BlockFi, a company operating in the cryptocurrency lending market, reported a doubling of monthly revenue in the second quarter. The driver was halving and launching a mobile application. “By now, monthly income has quadrupled since the end of last year and doubled if we start from the end of March,” said Zac Prince, co-founder, and CEO of the startup.
📌 CoinGecko, an analytical service, has announced a partnership with cybersecurity company Hacken. As part of the collaboration, CoinGecko integrated into the so-called Trust Score cryptocurrency exchange security assessment metrics based on the platform data from Hacken. Among others, Hacken considers platform infrastructure security, including server security, two-factor user authentication, spam and phishing protection, and other criteria.
📌 According to Messari, the market capitalization of dollar-tied stablecoin Tether (USDT) reached $10.3 billion. The growth since the beginning of the year, when the figure was $4.76 billion, exceeded 116%. Other stablecoins are significantly inferior to USDT in terms of market supply.
📌 Binance cryptocurrency exchange has completed a major update of the trading engine, increasing the processing speed of operations by 10 times, company CEO Changpeng Zhao said. According to him, the update was the largest in the history of Binance. It took two years to develop it. Zhao noted that in doing so, the exchange is preparing the “next wave” of cryptocurrency market growth.
Blockchain
📌 According to Messari, Bitcoin and Ethereum account for more than 99% of the commissions received by all miners. Over the past 24 hours, the total amount of commissions in the Bitcoin network has amounted to $407,571. Ethereum has a significantly higher rate — $814,082.
📌 On June 30, at block # 637 056 in the Bitcoin network, the planned recalculation of mining complexity took place. The indicator has undergone the most insignificant change since March 22, 2010, having decreased by 0.0033% from 15.7847 T to 15.7842 T. Thus, the complexity of mining Bitcoin almost did not change for the first time in 10 years.
📌 A transaction of 101 857 BTC (~$ 933 million at the time of sending) was recorded in the Bitcoin network between anonymous addresses. Transaction passed between anonymous addresses. The commission was only 48 cents. An anonymous whale used the SegWit protocol, which reduced costs by 41%.
📌 One of the Bitcoin users included the message “Hello, Noah! Welcome to the world, little one” in one of the transactions, thus recording the birth of their first child. The unchanging and censorship-resistant nature of Bitcoin will ensure that this message remains forever on the blockchain while it continues to function. The current case demonstrates a widely discussed scenario for using the first cryptocurrency as a decentralized database.
Hacking, Cyber Crimes
📌 Russian Sergei Medvedev admitted involvement in the cybercriminal organization Infraud, which traded stolen personal data, compromised credit cards, malware, and other illegal things. “Over the course of its seven-year history, Infraud caused an estimated loss of about $2.2 billion and more than $568 million in actual losses to a wide range of financial institutions, sellers and individuals,” the US Department of Justice declared.
📌 The criminals received a $1.14 million ransom after a successful attack on the University of California. The software installed by hackers encrypted the data on the university’s servers at the School of Medicine, making the information temporarily unavailable. To fix the problem, the institution had to pay 116.4 BTC.
📌 An unknown hacker managed to withdraw $500,000 in altcoins WETH, WBTC, SNX, and LINK from the pool of the Balancer Labs DeFi project using a smart contract vulnerability that allowed an attacker to create a shortage of funds in the pools.

That’s all for now! For more details follow us on Twitter, subscribe to our YouTube channel, join our Telegram.
submitted by CoinjoyAssistant to CryptoNews [link] [comments]

Weekly Crypto News — July, 03

What important crypto events happened last week?
Regulation, Government, Mass Adoption
📌 The U.S. court classified Coinbase as a traditional bank after the exchange revealed its customer information at the request of the FBI. This decision was made when considering the appeal of Richard Gratkowski, sentenced to 5 years and 10 months in prison. Earlier, the FBI found out that between June 2016 and May 2017, Richard Gratkovsky used Bitcoins to purchase prohibited pornographic materials involving minors. Having detected the wallets used by him, the agency turned to Coinbase with a request to disclose information about this client. The exchange complied with this requirement without a court order.
📌 Binance Exchange has confirmed the launch of a cryptocurrency debit card in partnership with Swipe. Information about this appeared on the official website of the company but later disappeared. One of the features of the card will be the ability to exchange cryptocurrencies for fiat money in real-time. Users will be able to transfer money to the card directly from the Binance trading account. Payments will be instant, funds can be spent immediately after crediting. In addition, cardholders will be able to withdraw cash from ATMs.
📌 The District of Columbia Bar has allowed lawyers in Washington D.C. to accept payments in Bitcoins and other cryptocurrencies. Representatives of the organization noted that cryptocurrencies are rapidly gaining popularity as a means of payment and lawyers cannot stand aside from these changes. Acceptance of payment in crypto is permissible if the lawyer is able to ensure the safe storage of assets. To do this, he must have basic knowledge in the field of blockchain.
Projects, Collaborations, Startups
📌 BlockFi, a company operating in the cryptocurrency lending market, reported a doubling of monthly revenue in the second quarter. The driver was halving and launching a mobile application. “By now, monthly income has quadrupled since the end of last year and doubled if we start from the end of March,” said Zac Prince, co-founder, and CEO of the startup.
📌 CoinGecko, an analytical service, has announced a partnership with cybersecurity company Hacken. As part of the collaboration, CoinGecko integrated into the so-called Trust Score cryptocurrency exchange security assessment metrics based on the platform data from Hacken. Among others, Hacken considers platform infrastructure security, including server security, two-factor user authentication, spam and phishing protection, and other criteria.
📌 According to Messari, the market capitalization of dollar-tied stablecoin Tether (USDT) reached $10.3 billion. The growth since the beginning of the year, when the figure was $4.76 billion, exceeded 116%. Other stablecoins are significantly inferior to USDT in terms of market supply.
📌 Binance cryptocurrency exchange has completed a major update of the trading engine, increasing the processing speed of operations by 10 times, company CEO Changpeng Zhao said. According to him, the update was the largest in the history of Binance. It took two years to develop it. Zhao noted that in doing so, the exchange is preparing the “next wave” of cryptocurrency market growth.
Blockchain
📌 According to Messari, Bitcoin and Ethereum account for more than 99% of the commissions received by all miners. Over the past 24 hours, the total amount of commissions in the Bitcoin network has amounted to $407,571. Ethereum has a significantly higher rate — $814,082.
📌 On June 30, at block # 637 056 in the Bitcoin network, the planned recalculation of mining complexity took place. The indicator has undergone the most insignificant change since March 22, 2010, having decreased by 0.0033% from 15.7847 T to 15.7842 T. Thus, the complexity of mining Bitcoin almost did not change for the first time in 10 years.
📌 A transaction of 101 857 BTC (~$ 933 million at the time of sending) was recorded in the Bitcoin network between anonymous addresses. Transaction passed between anonymous addresses. The commission was only 48 cents. An anonymous whale used the SegWit protocol, which reduced costs by 41%.
📌 One of the Bitcoin users included the message “Hello, Noah! Welcome to the world, little one” in one of the transactions, thus recording the birth of their first child. The unchanging and censorship-resistant nature of Bitcoin will ensure that this message remains forever on the blockchain while it continues to function. The current case demonstrates a widely discussed scenario for using the first cryptocurrency as a decentralized database.
Hacking, Cyber Crimes
📌 Russian Sergei Medvedev admitted involvement in the cybercriminal organization Infraud, which traded stolen personal data, compromised credit cards, malware, and other illegal things. “Over the course of its seven-year history, Infraud caused an estimated loss of about $2.2 billion and more than $568 million in actual losses to a wide range of financial institutions, sellers and individuals,” the US Department of Justice declared.
📌 The criminals received a $1.14 million ransom after a successful attack on the University of California. The software installed by hackers encrypted the data on the university’s servers at the School of Medicine, making the information temporarily unavailable. To fix the problem, the institution had to pay 116.4 BTC.
📌 An unknown hacker managed to withdraw $500,000 in altcoins WETH, WBTC, SNX, and LINK from the pool of the Balancer Labs DeFi project using a smart contract vulnerability that allowed an attacker to create a shortage of funds in the pools.

That’s all for now! For more details follow us on Twitter, subscribe to our YouTube channel, join our Telegram.
submitted by CoinjoyAssistant to u/CoinjoyAssistant [link] [comments]

Weekly Crypto News — July, 03

What important crypto events happened last week?
Regulation, Government, Mass Adoption
📌 The U.S. court classified Coinbase as a traditional bank after the exchange revealed its customer information at the request of the FBI. This decision was made when considering the appeal of Richard Gratkowski, sentenced to 5 years and 10 months in prison. Earlier, the FBI found out that between June 2016 and May 2017, Richard Gratkovsky used Bitcoins to purchase prohibited pornographic materials involving minors. Having detected the wallets used by him, the agency turned to Coinbase with a request to disclose information about this client. The exchange complied with this requirement without a court order.
📌 Binance Exchange has confirmed the launch of a cryptocurrency debit card in partnership with Swipe. Information about this appeared on the official website of the company but later disappeared. One of the features of the card will be the ability to exchange cryptocurrencies for fiat money in real-time. Users will be able to transfer money to the card directly from the Binance trading account. Payments will be instant, funds can be spent immediately after crediting. In addition, cardholders will be able to withdraw cash from ATMs.
📌 The District of Columbia Bar has allowed lawyers in Washington D.C. to accept payments in Bitcoins and other cryptocurrencies. Representatives of the organization noted that cryptocurrencies are rapidly gaining popularity as a means of payment and lawyers cannot stand aside from these changes. Acceptance of payment in crypto is permissible if the lawyer is able to ensure the safe storage of assets. To do this, he must have basic knowledge in the field of blockchain.
Projects, Collaborations, Startups
📌 BlockFi, a company operating in the cryptocurrency lending market, reported a doubling of monthly revenue in the second quarter. The driver was halving and launching a mobile application. “By now, monthly income has quadrupled since the end of last year and doubled if we start from the end of March,” said Zac Prince, co-founder, and CEO of the startup.
📌 CoinGecko, an analytical service, has announced a partnership with cybersecurity company Hacken. As part of the collaboration, CoinGecko integrated into the so-called Trust Score cryptocurrency exchange security assessment metrics based on the platform data from Hacken. Among others, Hacken considers platform infrastructure security, including server security, two-factor user authentication, spam and phishing protection, and other criteria.
📌 According to Messari, the market capitalization of dollar-tied stablecoin Tether (USDT) reached $10.3 billion. The growth since the beginning of the year, when the figure was $4.76 billion, exceeded 116%. Other stablecoins are significantly inferior to USDT in terms of market supply.
📌 Binance cryptocurrency exchange has completed a major update of the trading engine, increasing the processing speed of operations by 10 times, company CEO Changpeng Zhao said. According to him, the update was the largest in the history of Binance. It took two years to develop it. Zhao noted that in doing so, the exchange is preparing the “next wave” of cryptocurrency market growth.
Blockchain
📌 According to Messari, Bitcoin and Ethereum account for more than 99% of the commissions received by all miners. Over the past 24 hours, the total amount of commissions in the Bitcoin network has amounted to $407,571. Ethereum has a significantly higher rate — $814,082.
📌 On June 30, at block # 637 056 in the Bitcoin network, the planned recalculation of mining complexity took place. The indicator has undergone the most insignificant change since March 22, 2010, having decreased by 0.0033% from 15.7847 T to 15.7842 T. Thus, the complexity of mining Bitcoin almost did not change for the first time in 10 years.
📌 A transaction of 101 857 BTC (~$ 933 million at the time of sending) was recorded in the Bitcoin network between anonymous addresses. Transaction passed between anonymous addresses. The commission was only 48 cents. An anonymous whale used the SegWit protocol, which reduced costs by 41%.
📌 One of the Bitcoin users included the message “Hello, Noah! Welcome to the world, little one” in one of the transactions, thus recording the birth of their first child. The unchanging and censorship-resistant nature of Bitcoin will ensure that this message remains forever on the blockchain while it continues to function. The current case demonstrates a widely discussed scenario for using the first cryptocurrency as a decentralized database.
Hacking, Cyber Crimes
📌 Russian Sergei Medvedev admitted involvement in the cybercriminal organization Infraud, which traded stolen personal data, compromised credit cards, malware, and other illegal things. “Over the course of its seven-year history, Infraud caused an estimated loss of about $2.2 billion and more than $568 million in actual losses to a wide range of financial institutions, sellers and individuals,” the US Department of Justice declared.
📌 The criminals received a $1.14 million ransom after a successful attack on the University of California. The software installed by hackers encrypted the data on the university’s servers at the School of Medicine, making the information temporarily unavailable. To fix the problem, the institution had to pay 116.4 BTC.
📌 An unknown hacker managed to withdraw $500,000 in altcoins WETH, WBTC, SNX, and LINK from the pool of the Balancer Labs DeFi project using a smart contract vulnerability that allowed an attacker to create a shortage of funds in the pools.

That’s all for now! For more details follow us on Twitter, subscribe to our YouTube channel, join our Telegram.
submitted by CoinjoyAssistant to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

Top crypto events over the last decade

Top crypto events over the last decade
https://preview.redd.it/5ct38iefxwg41.png?width=3600&format=png&auto=webp&s=36bbfa32ede0eaed258881791acaf42cba5a39d7
2020 marks a decade since cryptocurrency became a part of a daily routine. Mass adoption of crypto started with Bitcoin’s appearance in 2009. A lot has happened in the Crypto World since then. Now let’s take a look at the most significant events over the last crypto decade.
  • In 2009 the first block of Bitcoins was mined for a 50 Bitcoins reward. The same year there was the first Bitcoin hard fork which gave us Namecoin.
  • The first exchange appeared in 2010. It was bitcoinmarket.com which doesn’t exist anymore. The same year it was hacked for the first time. This unpleasant event showed the most obvious flaws in the system though. It was rather important to understand all the possible drawbacks, and right up to this moment a lot of efforts are taken to prevent accidents like these.
https://preview.redd.it/2bei49bgxwg41.jpg?width=992&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=c17047ee3bfbe43102fb786469fe53abd45e70df
  • 2010 was also a year when investors appeared. A lot of people are looking for an opportunity to invest in crypto now, but it has taken some time to learn that crypto can actually be an investment.
  • 2011 was a year of cryptocurrencies’ debuts. Swiftcoin appeared, and as a result of the second Bitcoin hard fork Litecoin came to the Crypto World.
  • In 2011, a physicist by training, 29-year-old Ross William Ulbricht, registered the Internet community called Silk Road on the anonymous Tor network. It has become one of the largest drug trafficking sites in the world. While the site was working, it managed to serve about a million customers, and the turnover of illicit substances exceeded $200 million. Almost all the payments were made in Bitcoins. In October 2013, the FBI closed the Silk Road and arrested 144,000 bitcoins, which at that time was about $100 million.
  • In 2012 people started talking about Bitcoin. It was even mentioned in some TV shows.
  • 2012 was marked by the birth of XRP.
  • By 2013 there were around 10 cryptocurrency assets.
  • In 2013 arguments about cryptocurrency regulation started. Countries had to find a way to deal with new technologies. Germany, Thailand, and China prohibited the use of cryptocurrencies. At the same time Canada launched the very first Bitcoin ATM.
https://preview.redd.it/ifqduu7hxwg41.jpg?width=900&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=9139c1dd510c504aea5ee0508e692be72b07f999
  • 2014 is famous for the biggest cryptocurrency exchange hack. 850 000 BTC was stolen when the Mt.Gox exchange was hacked.
  • In 2015 several new cryptocurrencies appeared. The Ethereum ecosystem was introduced. Thanks to Ethereum we use smart contracts now.
  • In 2015 the number of Bitcoin ATMs increased, and Argentina started to accept crypto as a payment for taxi rides.
  • In 2015 all the ICOs started. Augur was the first to do this.
  • Starting from 2015 more and more cryptocurrencies appeared. As a result we have 200 000 tokens running on smart contracts now.
  • In 2017 Japan decided to legalize Bitcoin as a payment method. In Norway Bitcoin became an authorized investment and payment.
  • 2017 is famous for the appearance of the most adorable blockchain project, CryptoKitties. It is not a currency, but an asset. The main thing that distinguishes CryptoKitties from all the other tokens is the uniqueness. Usually tokens are interchangeable. The value of your assets is expressed primarily in the number of tokens you have. The value of each CryptoKitty is different. What kinds of CryptoKitties you have is important. So, your only CryptoKitty may cost more than three CryptoKitties of another user. Nonetheless, CryptoKitties are in fact ERC-721 tokens built on the Ethereum blockchain. Everything is administered by smart contracts, and ETH is used for all transactions. CryptoKitties became very famous. Since December 2, new kitties appeared every 15 minutes. They became a powerful tool in showing people how to use blockchain technologies in a fun way. CryptoKitties were so attractive that at a certain moment in 2017 they congested the Ethereum network.
https://preview.redd.it/0tfc13zhxwg41.jpg?width=2500&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=cdd8291103d4d943d9de8390e130b9da3eb7eae8
  • 15 November 2018 was the time when BCH hard fork happened. It was a result of the inner conflict between two camps: Roger Ver and Jihan Wu on the one side, and Craig Steven Wright and Calvin Ayre on the other side. This discord was caused by different versions of software. The whole thing culminated in creating BCH with 32 MB block size limit and BSV (Bitcoin Satoshi’s Vision) with 128 MB block size limit.
  • 2018 was time for European countries to come together and discuss cryptocurrency regulation.
  • 2019 was not a good year for XRP. In June wallets that were hosted on Gatehub were hacked and 23 200 000 XRP was stolen. Upbit exchange did not have a great year either. It was hacked and lost 10 000 ETH.
https://preview.redd.it/r28fh1lixwg41.jpg?width=997&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=0647df98dca5d5ad973649787415a0f56c27f360
There were a lot of attempts to create a digital currency. Not all of them were successful. Finally, Bitcoin appeared and changed the world’s perception of the concept. It came a long way and became a whole industry. It is developing constantly involving more and more people on the way. The list of new cryptocurrencies is expanding rapidly. For the next decade there are still some problems to solve, but nonetheless the future of cryptocurrency seems to be extremely exciting.
submitted by SimpleSwapExchange to btc [link] [comments]

kraken.us Customer Support Number +1(888)-780-0222 Get Help Now If any Issues u/WeirdAcanthocephala6

📷 kraken Customer Support Number +1-888-780-0222
In this guide, we’ll learn everything there is to know about the Coinbase vs Kraken rivalry!
So, you’re on our way to becoming a crypto buff and you’re ready to get trading! But, where do you start?!
Cryptocurrencies aren’t like bread, eggs, and milk. We can’t go down to our local store to get them, and Amazon definitely isn’t sending them with next-day delivery! Instead, we need to go to an online cryptocurrency exchange.
Essentially, these exchanges help us swap our local currency into cryptocurrency. They also provide a platform for trading cryptocurrencies, selling them and storing them. But with so many options available, which should you choose?
Kraken and Coinbase are some of the largest and most reputable online currency exchanges. However, it’s also important to understand their differences.
Back in 2011, the founder of Kraken, Jesse Powell, was working at the largest cryptocurrency exchange of its time, Mt. Gox. There had just been two major hacks, and security was becoming difficult to manage. Bitcoins were going missing. If this continued, the future of crypto was bleak.
Jesse thought that he could do a better job. He knew he could create a secure cryptocurrency exchange which would help people trust in the system and bring crypto into the mainstream!
So, he created Kraken. He focussed on security when creating Kraken; hackers were never going to get past his security system. And so far, it has worked — Kraken has never been hacked.
Now, Kraken aims to be the exchange that offers the widest range of cryptocurrencies that you can buy using fiat currencies (USD, EUR, JPY, etc.).
After its public refusal, Kraken expressed an intentionto return service to New York residence pending the removal of what it perceived as unfair and counterproductive licensing.
Coinsetter, announced to clients in December 2015 that it would thenceforth impose a $65 fee to offset the cost of the very same BitLicense Kraken refused to afford.
In absorbing Coinsetter, and by extension Cavirtex, the following month, Kraken opened up its platform to residents of 37 other states, and to all Canadian residents.
Alongside this deal, Kraken announced partnerships with payment providers SynapsePay in the U.S. and Vogogo in Canada, in order to provide its newest clients with access to fiat deposits and withdrawals respectively.
One month later, Kraken announced the completion of its Series B round of investment lead by SBI Investment, a prominent Japanese venture capitalist firm under SBI Holdings. Following this investment round,
Kraken announced two major acquisitions that year: Dutch exchange CleverCoin, which was acquired in June, and Glidera, a wallet service allowing users to directly fund Glidera bank accounts with fiat for the purchase of cryptocurrencies on the Kraken exchange.
Kraken's reputation for security was challenged amidst 2016's buildout of partnerships and acquisitions.
Multiple claims emerged in the latter half of July via news media and social networks that clients’ accounts had been compromised and funds stolen.
As Kraken went silent reportedly for investigation, users threatened to alert and petition the FBI's Cyber Crimes Division for redress. Within a month,
Kraken presented clarification that ‘Kraken’ was never compromised; that is, after internal investigation, the
security team reached the conclusion that Kraken systems, servers, and databases were not accessed by malicious attackers due to any identifiable vulnerability for which they would be responsible.
The company attributed affected users’ missing funds to phishing and man-in-the-middle attacks, and stressed the importance of enabling
Kraken websites security features, such as two-factor authentication for withdrawals or the Global Settings Lock to restrict unfamiliar IP access.
In the aftermath of the hack that wasn't, Kraken asserted recognition of their continued responsibility to protect clients, and stressed equally so, the client's responsibility in protecting him- or herself.
submitted by WeirdAcanthocephala6 to u/WeirdAcanthocephala6 [link] [comments]

Cryptocurrencies Vs Sanctions: The Battle Of The New Decade

Cryptocurrencies Vs Sanctions: The Battle Of The New Decade
In January, US President Donald Trump called for tougher economic sanctions against Iran amid a worsening conflict between the two countries. Pressure from America has been affecting the economy of former Persia for over 40 years, starting with the Islamic Revolution in 1979. But it seems that in 2020, the Iranians found a way to reduce the impact of many restrictions. In late January, journalists from the Arab international publication Asharq Al-Awsat told the world about Iran’s new bitcoin strategy, whose main goal is to circumvent international sanctions. At the same time, not only Iran, but also a number of other states are interested in the opportunity to deal with economic restrictions using digital money. Why do cryptocurrencies see salvation from sanctions? What role will CBDC play in this? And how do regulators imposing economic sanctions respond to the new movement?

https://preview.redd.it/2m36sp6cpvf41.jpg?width=1480&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=afb1b82de1514cda1ebc7acfcbb5c34f0b3d93d7

Iran and US example

Sanctions imposed on countries may differ in terms of severity and scope, but they are united by one thing — they negatively affect the local economy to a greater or lesser extent. Therefore, it is quite reasonable that many would like to get rid of them. Moreover, some countries, such as Iran, experience them very painfully. According to Asharq Al-Awsat reporters, only in the last two years, under the influence of US sanctions, the Iranian economy has dipped by 10–20%.
The example of Iran today is not just the most relevant. It also perfectly illustrates the severity of the sanctions and how cryptocurrencies help get around them. Under US restrictions, no American companies (including banks) are allowed to do business with Iranian partners. This actually cuts off Iran’s trade force, because the country is losing the ability to enter into profitable agreements with many of the world’s largest corporations. This situation is especially critical given how much Iran could earn from the US oil trade (just take a look at the UAE).
The second most important economic burden weighing on the shoulders of the Iranians is the ban on the use of dollars and disconnection from the international SWIFT system. For domestic transactions, such a restriction is useless and hits the state in about the same way as against a wall of peas. However, it seriously complicates foreign trade, because any Iranian international company is forced to rely on alternative currencies. This applies to absolutely all transactions with foreign companies, the vast majority of which use the dollar when conducting international business. Only a small part relies on the euro and even more so it is unlikely that any of the large companies will want to conduct transactions using the weak and unstable Iranian rial.
Naturally, pressure on Iran’s foreign policy negatively affects its internal state. In such a situation, bitcoin for the country becomes a kind of messiah, because it can be used to circumvent legal barriers and conduct international trade outside the traditional banking system. A good example: using bitcoin, you can conclude deals with foreign companies, including American ones (behind the scenes), and sell them the same oil.
Bitcoin is used not only by governments, but also ordinary citizens. Cryptocurrency for them is almost the only opportunity to send a transfer abroad and save money with high inflation and devaluation of the national currency.
At the same time, the Iranians consider Bitcoin not only as a payment instrument, but also as a source of income. We are talking about banal mining, which unfolded on a large scale amid cheap Iranian electricity and the constant devaluation of the rial.
Asharq Al-Awsat cites 2019 data:
• Last year, 1,650 Iranians using bitcoin were interviewed. • It turned out that 25% of them earn on cryptocurrencies from $ 500 to $ 3000 per month, including mining.
Initially, the idea of ​​mining was not particularly liked by the government, which prefers to punish the locals for the abuse of cheap electricity. However, in August 2019, mining in the country was recognized as a legal sector of the economy. Since then, regulators have issued more than a thousand licenses for the legal mining of bitcoins to local entrepreneurs. At the same time, today, the Iranian authorities themselves produce cryptocurrency and use the received coins to finance the state and carry out trade transactions in circumvention of sanctions.

Cryptocurrencies as a salvation from sanctions

Iran’s example is far from the only one when it comes to the use of digital money with the goal of circumventing sanctions in one way or another. For instance:
• At the end of 2018, the Venezuelan government launched its own digital coin, Petro. Technically, this is just another ERC20 token based on Ethereum. But in practice it is a tool for concluding international transactions bypassing sanctions imposed by the American government. When launching the national cryptocurrency, President Nicolas Maduro bluntly stated that Petro would help the country “break the financial blockade.” It cannot be said that the Venezuelan initiative has succeeded at the international level, however, the very idea is a “wake-up call” for world sanctions. • In November 2019, the BRICS countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa) expressed interest in creating a single cryptocurrency for trade settlements between the members of the union. This is a certain analogue of SWIFT, the main purpose of which is to protect itself from sanctions in order to avoid situations, as in Iran. A similar question is especially acute for China, which is waging a trade war with the United States and runs the risk of running into serious economic measures on the part of Washington, as well as for Russia, which is under growing pressure from world regulators. • Two months ago, US law enforcement authorities arrested Ethereum developer Virgil Griffith for aiding the DPRK authorities in circumventing sanctions. The FBI claims that Griffith attended a local blockchain conference and talked about options for using cryptocurrencies for illegal international payments. First and foremost, US authorities fear that North Koreans will use knowledge to fund a nuclear weapons program. • A few days ago, the popular Blockchain.com crypto wallet (formerly Blockchain.info) added the ability to quickly convert the Turkish lira to BTC and vice versa. Turks are interested in diversifying their savings, since the national currency is experiencing serious problems and today it is estimated at only 20% of its value in 2008. In many ways, for its problems, the lyre should “thank” the American sanctions imposed on Turkey for its role in the situation with Syria. And even if they were canceled in October, the US Senate in December called on Trump to apply new economic restrictions in response to the fact that Turkey is a member of NATO and does not shy away from purchases of Russian defense systems. Amid these problems, foreign banks are gradually ceasing their activities in the country, exacerbating the unenviable position of the Turks. Meanwhile, already a quarter of citizens are actively using bitcoins and are thus protected from the consequences of sanctions. In an attempt to save the economy, the Turkish government is seriously considering the use of national digital currencies.
It is interesting that with the help of cryptocurrencies it is possible to bypass not only international, but also internal corporate sanctions in almost any country in the world. We are talking about the most common state prohibitions on any product or service. The fact is that in almost all countries of the world such restrictions imply a legal backdoor for ordinary citizens, because the criminal liability applies only to service providers, but not to consumers.
Let us illustrate with the example of Norway. The government has officially banned the gambling sector. Under the law, almost everything that remotely resembles gambling rates is prohibited. Nevertheless, the growing number of new online casinos suggests that the ban does not work. Why is that? Because local gaming platforms are managed anonymously, use advanced security measures and implement a cryptocurrency payment system. As a result, the authorities, purely technically unable to track the owners and close illegal sites. But most importantly, the Norwegians are calmly betting on digital money, without fear of the wrath of regulators and any legal consequences. Just because the law says that the consumer is not to blame.

Is this good or bad

All of the above looms in a rather controversial picture:
• On the one hand, crypto enthusiasts around the world should be proud that the blockchain technology has turned out to be so powerful and effective that entire countries consider cryptocurrencies as a way to repulse sanctions. In this way, states can gain long-awaited freedom and pursue the policy that they consider necessary. • On the other hand, sanctions are imposed for a reason. For some countries, this is salvation, but for others, problems. In today’s economy and politics, sanctions play an important role. In this aspect, the States see cryptocurrencies as a threat to national security, so every year they tighten the screws on crypto projects more tightly and tighten the noose around the neck of the cryptocurrency exchange.
Forbes blockchain expert Jason Brett, a former representative of the American Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), believes that the American authorities are confused and urgently need help from the crypto industry. Talented blockchain specialists could help develop economic sanctions that are effective in the world of cryptocurrencies. But until then, the expert believes, the policy of Americans regarding digital money will remain quite aggressive, and in their attempts to curb technology they will restrain its growth.
submitted by affilcoin to u/affilcoin [link] [comments]

Top crypto events over the last decade

Top crypto events over the last decade

https://preview.redd.it/knrz672dwwg41.png?width=3600&format=png&auto=webp&s=5f3ebf91ec0d2d6fddc9384fd973315cf7e4e3e5
2020 marks a decade since cryptocurrency became a part of a daily routine. Mass adoption of crypto started with Bitcoin’s appearance in 2009. A lot has happened in the Crypto World since then. Now let’s take a look at the most significant events over the last crypto decade.
  • In 2009 the first block of Bitcoins was mined for a 50 Bitcoins reward. The same year there was the first Bitcoin hard fork which gave us Namecoin.
  • The first exchange appeared in 2010. It was bitcoinmarket.com which doesn’t exist anymore. The same year it was hacked for the first time. This unpleasant event showed the most obvious flaws in the system though. It was rather important to understand all the possible drawbacks, and right up to this moment a lot of efforts are taken to prevent accidents like these.
https://preview.redd.it/6h4rluwdwwg41.jpg?width=992&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=d9b938d15142eac43a64a05a1d11b492e2f1f322
  • 2010 was also a year when investors appeared. A lot of people are looking for an opportunity to invest in crypto now, but it has taken some time to learn that crypto can actually be an investment.
  • 2011 was a year of cryptocurrencies’ debuts. Swiftcoin appeared, and as a result of the second Bitcoin hard fork Litecoin came to the Crypto World.
  • In 2011, a physicist by training, 29-year-old Ross William Ulbricht, registered the Internet community called Silk Road on the anonymous Tor network. It has become one of the largest drug trafficking sites in the world. While the site was working, it managed to serve about a million customers, and the turnover of illicit substances exceeded $200 million. Almost all the payments were made in Bitcoins. In October 2013, the FBI closed the Silk Road and arrested 144,000 bitcoins, which at that time was about $100 million.
  • In 2012 people started talking about Bitcoin. It was even mentioned in some TV shows.
  • 2012 was marked by the birth of XRP.
  • By 2013 there were around 10 cryptocurrency assets.
  • In 2013 arguments about cryptocurrency regulation started. Countries had to find a way to deal with new technologies. Germany, Thailand, and China prohibited the use of cryptocurrencies. At the same time Canada launched the very first Bitcoin ATM.
https://preview.redd.it/yqmqqpwewwg41.jpg?width=900&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=97a8adbdd1dded2c33aa1c9651175d54651454a1
  • 2014 is famous for the biggest cryptocurrency exchange hack. 850 000 BTC was stolen when the Mt.Gox exchange was hacked.
  • In 2015 several new cryptocurrencies appeared. The Ethereum ecosystem was introduced. Thanks to Ethereum we use smart contracts now.
  • In 2015 the number of Bitcoin ATMs increased, and Argentina started to accept crypto as a payment for taxi rides.
  • In 2015 all the ICOs started. Augur was the first to do this.
  • Starting from 2015 more and more cryptocurrencies appeared. As a result we have 200 000 tokens running on smart contracts now.
  • In 2017 Japan decided to legalize Bitcoin as a payment method. In Norway Bitcoin became an authorized investment and payment.
  • 2017 is famous for the appearance of the most adorable blockchain project, CryptoKitties. It is not a currency, but an asset. The main thing that distinguishes CryptoKitties from all the other tokens is the uniqueness. Usually tokens are interchangeable. The value of your assets is expressed primarily in the number of tokens you have. The value of each CryptoKitty is different. What kinds of CryptoKitties you have is important. So, your only CryptoKitty may cost more than three CryptoKitties of another user. Nonetheless, CryptoKitties are in fact ERC-721 tokens built on the Ethereum blockchain. Everything is administered by smart contracts, and ETH is used for all transactions. CryptoKitties became very famous. Since December 2, new kitties appeared every 15 minutes. They became a powerful tool in showing people how to use blockchain technologies in a fun way. CryptoKitties were so attractive that at a certain moment in 2017 they congested the Ethereum network.
https://preview.redd.it/uvifvwtfwwg41.jpg?width=2500&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=2091e747922b81efae9257d15e924d804eb85bfd
  • 15 November 2018 was the time when BCH hard fork happened. It was a result of the inner conflict between two camps: Roger Ver and Jihan Wu on the one side, and Craig Steven Wright and Calvin Ayre on the other side. This discord was caused by different versions of software. The whole thing culminated in creating BCH with 32 MB block size limit and BSV (Bitcoin Satoshi’s Vision) with 128 MB block size limit.
  • 2018 was time for European countries to come together and discuss cryptocurrency regulation.
  • 2019 was not a good year for XRP. In June wallets that were hosted on Gatehub were hacked and 23 200 000 XRP was stolen. Upbit exchange did not have a great year either. It was hacked and lost 10 000 ETH.
https://preview.redd.it/1km3kvrgwwg41.jpg?width=997&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=e07c6929dafd73535dfab29e243966bbddd19d3f
There were a lot of attempts to create a digital currency. Not all of them were successful. Finally, Bitcoin appeared and changed the world’s perception of the concept. It came a long way and became a whole industry. It is developing constantly involving more and more people on the way. The list of new cryptocurrencies is expanding rapidly. For the next decade there are still some problems to solve, but nonetheless the future of cryptocurrency seems to be extremely exciting.
submitted by SimpleSwapExchange to CryptoCurrencyTrading [link] [comments]

Top crypto events over the last decade

Top crypto events over the last decade

https://preview.redd.it/sq4dzdy5vwg41.png?width=3600&format=png&auto=webp&s=78d5072b99f48b3cfa6cd07afda9f3b562bcf324
2020 marks a decade since cryptocurrency became a part of a daily routine. Mass adoption of crypto started with Bitcoin’s appearance in 2009. A lot has happened in the Crypto World since then. Now let’s take a look at the most significant events over the last crypto decade.
  • In 2009 the first block of Bitcoins was mined for a 50 Bitcoins reward. The same year there was the first Bitcoin hard fork which gave us Namecoin.
  • The first exchange appeared in 2010. It was bitcoinmarket.com which doesn’t exist anymore. The same year it was hacked for the first time. This unpleasant event showed the most obvious flaws in the system though. It was rather important to understand all the possible drawbacks, and right up to this moment a lot of efforts are taken to prevent accidents like these.
https://preview.redd.it/ydgdqdw6vwg41.jpg?width=992&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=238682017e54ff82ba8d7b6bf759c31f980a504e
  • 2010 was also a year when investors appeared. A lot of people are looking for an opportunity to invest in crypto now, but it has taken some time to learn that crypto can actually be an investment.
  • 2011 was a year of cryptocurrencies’ debuts. Swiftcoin appeared, and as a result of the second Bitcoin hard fork Litecoin came to the Crypto World.
  • In 2011, a physicist by training, 29-year-old Ross William Ulbricht, registered the Internet community called Silk Road on the anonymous Tor network. It has become one of the largest drug trafficking sites in the world. While the site was working, it managed to serve about a million customers, and the turnover of illicit substances exceeded $200 million. Almost all the payments were made in Bitcoins. In October 2013, the FBI closed the Silk Road and arrested 144,000 bitcoins, which at that time was about $100 million.
  • In 2012 people started talking about Bitcoin. It was even mentioned in some TV shows.
  • 2012 was marked by the birth of XRP.
  • By 2013 there were around 10 cryptocurrency assets.
  • In 2013 arguments about cryptocurrency regulation started. Countries had to find a way to deal with new technologies. Germany, Thailand, and China prohibited the use of cryptocurrencies. At the same time Canada launched the very first Bitcoin ATM.
https://preview.redd.it/ihloag98vwg41.jpg?width=900&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=66a54edb739c689139213d387b33c29a97b7480d
  • 2014 is famous for the biggest cryptocurrency exchange hack. 850 000 BTC was stolen when the Mt.Gox exchange was hacked.
  • In 2015 several new cryptocurrencies appeared. The Ethereum ecosystem was introduced. Thanks to Ethereum we use smart contracts now.
  • In 2015 the number of Bitcoin ATMs increased, and Argentina started to accept crypto as a payment for taxi rides.
  • In 2015 all the ICOs started. Augur was the first to do this.
  • Starting from 2015 more and more cryptocurrencies appeared. As a result we have 200 000 tokens running on smart contracts now.
  • In 2017 Japan decided to legalize Bitcoin as a payment method. In Norway Bitcoin became an authorized investment and payment.
  • 2017 is famous for the appearance of the most adorable blockchain project, CryptoKitties. It is not a currency, but an asset. The main thing that distinguishes CryptoKitties from all the other tokens is the uniqueness. Usually tokens are interchangeable. The value of your assets is expressed primarily in the number of tokens you have. The value of each CryptoKitty is different. What kinds of CryptoKitties you have is important. So, your only CryptoKitty may cost more than three CryptoKitties of another user. Nonetheless, CryptoKitties are in fact ERC-721 tokens built on the Ethereum blockchain. Everything is administered by smart contracts, and ETH is used for all transactions. CryptoKitties became very famous. Since December 2, new kitties appeared every 15 minutes. They became a powerful tool in showing people how to use blockchain technologies in a fun way. CryptoKitties were so attractive that at a certain moment in 2017 they congested the Ethereum network.
https://preview.redd.it/oz48y1g9vwg41.jpg?width=2500&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=4721d40913ca0de719e07331300d979610ea68b7
  • 15 November 2018 was the time when BCH hard fork happened. It was a result of the inner conflict between two camps: Roger Ver and Jihan Wu on the one side, and Craig Steven Wright and Calvin Ayre on the other side. This discord was caused by different versions of software. The whole thing culminated in creating BCH with 32 MB block size limit and BSV (Bitcoin Satoshi’s Vision) with 128 MB block size limit.
  • 2018 was time for European countries to come together and discuss cryptocurrency regulation.
  • 2019 was not a good year for XRP. In June wallets that were hosted on Gatehub were hacked and 23 200 000 XRP was stolen. Upbit exchange did not have a great year either. It was hacked and lost 10 000 ETH.
https://preview.redd.it/djmzr6oavwg41.jpg?width=997&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=d08c447c081fd0e4d7f90762c8a66262b6dfb547
There were a lot of attempts to create a digital currency. Not all of them were successful. Finally, Bitcoin appeared and changed the world’s perception of the concept. It came a long way and became a whole industry. It is developing constantly involving more and more people on the way. The list of new cryptocurrencies is expanding rapidly. For the next decade there are still some problems to solve, but nonetheless the future of cryptocurrency seems to be extremely exciting.
submitted by SimpleSwapExchange to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

Customers of the bitcoin exchange lost all the money because its head died

For almost a year, the story with one of Canada's largest cryptocurrency exchanges, Quadriga CX, has been going on. In early 2019, the company announced the death of the head of the company — 30-year-old Gerald Cotten. She added that only he knew the passwords and keys to the wallets where tens of thousands of users ' bitcoins are stored. This was ostensibly his security measure, but because of this, Quadriga CX cannot refund customers.
Such an unusual situation, as well as mysterious details from the past and the circumstances of Cotten's death, have led to theories that the head of the exchange actually fabricated his death to hide with users ' cryptocurrency-that's $ 160 million.
By December 2019, suspicions had reached such a stage that Quadriga CX depositors demanded the exhumation of the body. All to make sure that Gerald Cotten is really dead and not hiding with their bitcoins.
One person for all passwords
Cotten's death was announced in January 2019, with 9 December 2018 as the date of death. According to Quadriga CX, the CEO of the company died from complications of Crohn's disease on the way to the opening of an orphanage in India. And his death was not the only tragedy-the exchange's customers learned that only he had access to their bitcoins.
We are talking about "cold" wallets without access to the Internet, which are considered one of the most reliable means to store cryptocurrency. Passwords from them and encryption keys knew only Cotten, according to Quadriga CX, as he wanted to ensure maximum security.
As a result, the cryptocurrency savings of more than 75 thousand people were in limbo. That's about $ 160 million.
The wife of the deceased Jennifer Cotten said she tried to find recovery codes, but "repeated intensified searches" came to nothing. "My husband did most of his business from his encrypted laptop, but I don't know the password," she said. According to Jennifer, over the hacking of the laptop fought several experts and one managed to crack email. But the messages there are supposedly not just encrypted, but self-destruct.
On January 28, the Quadriga CX website went offline, and representatives of the company almost stopped communicating with customers. Then there was speculation on Reddit: what if Gerald Cotten faked his death to appropriate the money for himself? And together with journalists, they began their investigation.
Reasons for doubt
The doubts of Quadriga CX customers can be understood: there are many suspicious factors in the story. It all started with the cause of death-Crohn's disease, a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that rarely ends in death.
According to Reddit users, Cotten "died extremely well" in India, where there are more opportunities to fake a death than in Canada. The wife of the head of Quadriga CX published the death certificate as evidence, but she was no longer believed.
Further-more. Cotten had changed his will two weeks before his trip to India, leaving his wife a large inheritance. Among the items in the will: two houses in different regions of Canada, two cars, a yacht and a small Cessna 400 plane. Cotten's total assets are nearly $ 10 million.
At the same time, Quadriga CX experienced financial problems throughout 2018. The crypto exchange entered the market in 2013 and became one of the local leaders, but since the beginning of 2018 it has been "at war" with The canadian Imperial Bank (CIBC), which froze $ 22 million without an established owner. At the same time, customers began to complain that they could not access the cryptocurrency.
According to the publication Decrypt, the popularity of the platform gradually fell, and Cotten blamed the traditional banking system of Canada, which put a spoke in the wheels of the cryptocurrency community. In early December, representatives of Quadriga CX announced that the problems with CIBC were solved-a few days before the death of the head of the company.
In February, the Nova Scotia Supreme court appointed audit firm Ernst & Young to review all financial transactions of the cryptocurrency exchange. The Agency's investigation revealed "significant problems and irregularities" in the management of the Quadriga CX.
According to experts Ernst & Young, those encrypted" cold " wallets were not 160 million dollars, but several hundred thousand. Presumably, Cotten transferred large amounts of client deposits to his personal accounts, hidden behind pseudonyms.
The widow Cotten disavowed her husband's actions, saying she knew nothing about it. Auditors managed to track down and return a small part of the funds to customers, another part was paid by Jennifer Cotten. But thousands of crypto investors were still left without their deposits. Quadriga CX started the procedure of bankruptcy.
Skeletons in the closet
The most active clients of the cryptocurrency exchange, confident that Cotten is still alive, organized an investigative Telegram chat "Quadriga Uncovered". The number of participants in the chat numbered 500 people, periodically there were journalists and even FBI agents who were also interested in the story. In total, according to media reports, four different services from different countries are involved in the case.
Internet detectives began to study Cotten's youth and discovered that as early as 2003 He was an active user of the TalkGold forum, where "high-yield investment projects"were shared and discussed. Most of them are classic financial pyramids. Cotten supposedly launched at least a few similar projects, promoting them on the forum. He was 15 years old.
At some point, Cotten met Michael Patrin, with whom They later founded Quadriga CX. Representatives of the canadian cryptocurrency industry recalled that Patrin appeared in the community suddenly: "It quickly became clear that he is not who he claims to be. Sometimes he introduced himself as Michael from India, sometimes as Michael from Pakistan, sometimes as Michael from Italy. But he knew what he was doing."
Canadian media claim that Michael Patrin is the pseudonym of Omar Danani, and he used to live in California. Danani was found guilty of fraud and money laundering, he spent 18 months in prison. He was linked to the website Shadowcrew, where stolen credit cards and Bank card numbers were traded.
In 2007, Omar was released, after which he allegedly moved to Canada and changed his name. Initially he was Omar Patrin, and a year later he became Michael Patrin. The co-founder of Quadriga CX has denied this information several times.
To dig and prove
The story of the cryptocurrency exchange has been going on for more than a year. Quadriga CX users have filed a class action lawsuit against the platform, but it is already considered bankrupt. During this time, journalists and Internet detectives have formulated three main versions of what could happen to 160 million dollars in cryptocurrency.
Cotten did die, but his death was used to hide the fact that the Quadriga CX had no money. The company was experiencing financial difficulties, the head of the company transferred money to himself, and the startup itself could "burn out" on unsuccessful cryptocurrency trading. Perhaps, after Cotten's death, the management decided that it was possible to cover their tracks with a story about passwords from wallets;
Quadriga CX-originally a fraudulent firm through which Cotten and Omar Danani (aka Michael Patrin) engaged in money laundering. This is indicated by details from the past of both co founders of the company;
The failure of the Quadriga CX is simply the result of terrible management of the company. As the business grew, Cotten failed. There are approximately 215 cryptocurrency exchanges in the world. 36 exchanges closed for various reasons. Perhaps the story of Quadriga CX is just another failure in the cryptocurrency market.
Many interlocutors of canadian journalists from employees of cryptocurrency companies, as well as doctors specializing in Crohn's disease, believe that Gerald Cotten died for real. But if so, depositors are unlikely to get their money and bitcoins back. So it's probably easier for them to believe in a conspiracy.
In December 2019, users of the Quadriga CX demanded that Cotten's body be exhumed. Law firm Miller Thomson, representing the interests of investors, justified this "questionable circumstances" of the death of the head of the company. Cotten's widow and former Quadriga CX management oppose the grave opening. The decision on exhumation will be made by the spring of 2020
More https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmYpavSD9aALIt_lhde2Ewg?view_as=subscriber
submitted by chapikla to u/chapikla [link] [comments]

I'm an Undercover FBI Agent on the Deep Web

Part one
My name is Special Agent “Barry Allen” . (Not my real name of course) It's actually my code name. Given to me by my colleagues. You may recognize this name from the comic book character “The Flash”. I was given this name due to my quickness to obtain IP addresses , bypass firewalls and hack into certain deep web sites and shut them down. That is my area of expertise.
However, I've also been assigned to a Joint Task Force before which tracked and arrested drug runners, firearms dealers and human trafficking rings. Believe it or not. The federal government is everywhere. Social media, Reddit, YouTube. You name it. We have our guys on it. We monitor everything. That being said, the FBI only has jurisdiction to operate within the borders of the United States.
In this new digital age we find ourselves living, Cybercrime is much more of a direct threat. Now more than ever…
Yes in the past we feared as a nation, biological and chemical warfare. As an example, right after 9/11 the United States had an Anthrax attack. In the FBI, it was known as “Amerithrax” Letters were mailed containing anthrax spores to several news media offices and to Democratic Senators Tom Daschle and Patrick Leahy, killing 5 people and infecting 17 others. Once the victim opened the letters they would immediately be exposed to the spores. Inhaling them is the most deadly form of the attacks. And it quickly destroys your immune and respiratory system's.Back then there were no known cures and it was difficult to treat as the symptoms often times confused doctors. The death rate once exposed was nearly 95% .No one was ever officially arrested or tried as the primary suspect for this horrific crime. If you ask me though, the scariest part of this investigation is where it led us….To a lab on an Army base. Essentially the US Army was weaponizing Anthrax using independent scientists specializing in microbiological warfare.
Of course though, if you wanted to bring down Western Civilization today , all you'd have to do is manipulate or destroy our satellites and we would be back in the dark ages. Computers, banks , grocery stores and cell phones, power plants, even the water filtration system runs with electronics and the ability to communicate with satellites.
Essentially, our world now depends on this. It's scary to think about. Especially when 14 year olds are hacking into the largest banks in the world from their mother's basement. Somehow they are able to bypass the best security systems we know of. (I personally believe they are using password skimmers) We joke in my department that in order to work for us, you simply only need to be smarter than a teenager.
My background is in IT while in the military. While serving i also obtained several certifications and degrees in my field..
I worked alongside someone i never thought i would. Turns out the federal government often times hires former hackers to “consult” for them. In fact they have an army of internet soldiers at their disposal. I was actually trained by a convicted felon. It's been said he is one of the best hackers in the world. Eventually i was put in contact with men in the FBI. Essentially went through a series of rigorous “tests” to determine my operating field of work. After seeing our skills, they then placed myself and the felon on the Cyber Anti-Terrorism unit (or CAT as we call it) .
Our first assignment was to locate a man on the Deep Web known only as “Captain Death” He runs this anonymous site in which the viewers would donate bitcoin to watch unspeakable acts of torture, mutilation and murder. Often times called “Red Rooms”. After searching for a while, clicking on every single link given to us, we found the exact link which directed us to the host site.We visited the website. For a moment the page was completely black. So we waited a few moments. Suddenly a bright red colored text appears across the top of the screen. “Welcome! To the house of pain, tonight's events will commence in 2 minutes. Enjoy” Looking over at my colleague, Jeff begins penetrating the sites security systems attempting to find the IP address of the hosts location. Viewing the site still with my eyes locked onto the screen. Using my laptop separate from Jeffs. The monitor goes black, Then a video attempts to load. Buffering now for several minutes. “Any luck Jeff”? I ask. “I'm searching for a weakness in the security firewall. Give me a minute” he responds. Frustrated i say, “We may not have a minute” Using access control, Jeff was able to find and manipulate the users login information bringing down the video before the it began. Believe it or not. One of the weakest points to a website can often times be it's login feature. Jeff found a vulnerability in the source codes software and exploited it. Still haven't found the guy. As that process is much more difficult. For now, we can rest a little bit easier knowing his account is compromised.
The best hack is when you can invade a security system and not ever be noticed. This was not one of those instances. “Who are you” appears on Jeff's computer screen. He responds quickly “The Dark Knight” in bold green text as he looks over the offenders account. Attempting to track down banking information. Recent transactions. Even bitcoin exchange.
Searching over the vast amount of data pouring into the site. Seems they have gone through great lengths to keep themselves hidden from the public. The Identity of the perp is still unknown. Patting Jeff on the shoulder i thank him for saving my eyes from witnessing god only knows what. I suppose for now it's a small victory. “Let's take a break Jeff” I urge. Shutting down our laptops we exit the dark cold room we sat in with monitors, computers, servers and many other electronic components all around us. One thing to remember, heat is the enemy of electronics. and for some strange reason, we enjoy freezing our asses off while hacking.
Walking outside Jeff lights up a cigarette and takes a drag. Putting on his sunglasses “Want one?” He asks “No thanks, they really break my concentration, I don't seem to function well with that in my system” i reply… he scoffs and quietly whispers (amateur) while choking and coughing. I smile and look up “Yeah well at least I can breathe” I say laughing. (A smile forming on ny face) We begin walking to a nearby restaurant. My phone lights up and rings loudly. It's my supervisor. “Go for Barry” I speak confidently. My boss is breathing heavily into the phone and says sternly “What's the News on Captain Death”? I begin to inform him on our progress and our struggles. “Keep me posted Barry, good work.” He says. (Not telling him Jeff did most of the work, i feel bad for taking credit for this one)
Reaching the doors of the bar and grill, I notice a man sitting in the corner of the restaurant with his family. Jumping back quickly while peering around the corner. Jeff gives me a strange look as I inform him that man is a fugitive from an earlier investigation. I call in for back up and sit back in our unmarked unit waiting for the Cavalry to arrive as he is armed and extremely dangerous. 15 minutes pass as back up swarms the parking lot. We exit the vehicle and surround the building. Rushing in 12 men strong, guns drawn we make the arrest. Fortunately, he did not resist. No civilians were harmed on the takedown.This man has been on the run for months moving from state to state. I had previously set up a sting operation to illegally buy stolen guns from the man which had been arranged through the deep web. However , this particular sting was an in-person arms deal. He appeared very spooked and got away from us before the transaction was made. After searching his panel van today we found an entire armory of weapons. A few days pass and we now have a search warrant issued by the judge for his last known address. Confiscating all of his computers, hard drives and weapons. My partner and I found a hidden room below the living room floor boards with $1.4 million dollars in it. It also had passports and other documents. He was ready to flee the country for sure. Why he was out in public is beyond me. Though often times, men like him feel they are untouchable and above the law.
It's several weeks later and work has been slow. (Not sure if that is good or bad) Until today that is, I began chatting on forums and meeting interesting characters in chat rooms. On the clear net and deep web. Today I met a dark shadowy figure online. He claims to have worked with a group of hackers who specializes in debit and credit card theft online. (Playing the part ask in a private chat) “How much does this pay?” Moments pass with no answer. I sit and wait for a response. A message appears with a link and a phone number. “Contact him for a trial run, if you do well. He'll set you up with further work” he writes. (Thinking for a moment, finally an adversary worth hunting) Typing quickly I say “Who is he, do you know him personally”? He responds rapidly and the text box closes after he writes “Rule number one, no names!” Fortunately I was able to copy the link and phone number before my computer screen went completely blank.
Reaching for the burner phone i recently acquired i begin dialing the number provided. It rings several times. No answer. So i check out the link i copied. Right before i click on it. My phone lights up and rings beside me forcing me to jump out of my seat. Startled i look at the cell phone. Mildly confused as it reads 'unknown number’. Quickly i answer the phone. A man on the other end speaks. “How did you find this number”? he asks. I inform him i was searching online for a while. Im new and im looking for work. “I was told you're the man to call if i wanted some action, i need the money” i implore. “Competition is next week, meet at this address, winner gets a spot on my team, if you think you're up for the test, be on time” he demands. I thank him and abruptly hang up.
Jeff comes over to my place. He has some info on low level guys in the fraudulent/stolen debit card scheme. Using an unmarked and totally not suspicious surveillance van. We follow a few men on their day to day operations. For the most part, this portion of our job is the worst. Very daunting and boring. Sitting and waiting isn't exactly glamourous as the movies depict it to be.
From what we can tell so far these men are using credit card skimmers. Victims of credit card skimming are completely blindsided by the theft. They notice fraudulent charges on their accounts or money withdrawn from their accounts, but their credit and debit cards never left their possession. How did the theft happen?
You may be wondering, what exactly is this? Credit card skimming is a type of credit card theft where crooks use a small device to steal credit card information in an otherwise legitimate credit or debit card transaction. When a credit or debit card is swiped through a skimmer, the device captures and stores all the details stored in the card's magnetic stripe. The stripe contains the credit card number and expiration date and the credit card holder's full name. Thieves use the stolen data to make fraudulent charges either online or with a counterfeit credit card.
These men have been using these small devices all over the local area and surrounding states as well. Targeting the nicer areas of town. Attaching the devices to the ATMs. Sitting a short distance away in their cars watching each victim approaching. Laughing all the way to the bank...so to speak. After several days of stake-outs. Out team makes the arrests. Finding blank cards, machines and large sums of cash on hand. After hours of interrogations we learn a much bigger scheme is in the works. The men inform us that they were merely a distraction for a much larger crime. My supervisor gives us clearance to make a deal with them. Lessening their charges if they are willing to cooperate. Speaking with the men for 3 more hours we learn what's really going on. The next few days are extremely tense as our offices try to warn all the banks and even get the media involved.
Calling every bank, big and small we alert them of the situation that cybercriminals are poised to carry out an “ATM cash-out,” an operation that gives thieves access to untold sums of money by bypassing security measures on an ATM. If successful, the operation has the potential to be a heist unlike any we’ve ever seen.
The FBI has obtained unspecified reporting indicating cyber criminals are planning to conduct a global Automated Teller Machine (ATM) cash-out scheme in the coming days, likely associated with an unknown card issuer breach and commonly referred to as an ‘unlimited operation‘.
These unlimited operations compromise financial institutions or payment processors by installing malware that allows hackers to exploit network access, allowing admin-level access. Once inside, they can disable fraud protection, raise maximum ATM withdrawal amounts (and transaction limits) and withdraw large sums of money. Millions, potentially.
All they’ll need to carry out the attack are debit and credit card numbers found on the dark web, and dummy cards, also known as “blanks,” to attach the numbers to.
The cyber criminals typically create fraudulent copies of legitimate cards by sending stolen card data to co-conspirators who imprint the data on reusable magnetic strip cards, such as gift cards purchased at retail stores. At a pre-determined time, the co-conspirators withdraw account funds from ATMs using these cards.
It's nearly a week later and im preparing for my tests. I have my laptop ready in its case. Im extremely nervous.The information given to me is that i am to meet at this very strange building on the outskirts of town. I have no idea what to expect. I must come in first place to become a member of the team and ultimately take down the leader of this cybercrime domestic terrorist.
If things go according to his plan.He could potentially put the entire country on its knees and our banking systems would completely collapse.Chaos and madness will spread like wildfires. Millions of people unable to access their money will riot and destroy stores. Stealing food and everything they can get their hands on. The police will be overrun and unable to do anything about it. The military would most certainly be called in an attempt to regain order. Mass hysteria ensues. To the extremes we have never seen before. I must stop him. Before its too late….
Part 2
The day has come and I just received the call I've long avoided. It is time. The competition for top tier hackers are meeting at this building in which i believed to have been abandoned. We are in the surveillance van. Heading towards our destination. Our equipment is all packed up. Wearing a wire on my chest. (Hopefully they don't pat me down upon entry) Jeff is driving recklessly, as he has a bad habit of being late. Testing the audio in the back of the van. Generally this is done days before an operation. However, we are rather short on time. (Not pointing any fingers)
Leaving the city limits, we now enter a heavily wooded area. There is only one way in. The road is turning into rubble. Small rocks are shooting from our tires .Lights are fading behind us as we venture further into the forest. Jeff now using high beams. We notice it's grown quiet. Other than hearing the tires on the gravel road. There seems to be less and less wildlife in the area. I got this feeling like we are being watched.
Checking my cell phone, we have lost all signal. (Is this a trap)? i thought . Our other equipment seems to work just fine. I can begin to see dim lights in the distance. We must be nearing the competition. “You ready for this?” (Jeff asks while blowing smoke out the window) I start to swat the backdraft of the smoke billowing back into my window. “Yeah, I'm ready, you should really consider cutting back on the smokes.” I utter. Just then, a pack of Marlboros are hurled in my direction. “We're here , Barry. Make sure you have everything.” (Jeff commands) “I'm all set.” I reply.
Jeff stops the Van on the gravel. Exiting the vehicle, i grab my backpack while adjusting my clothes. (I found some glasses with regular lens in them, so as to ‘look the part’) Walking towards the building i speak quietly into my chest microphone. “Test, test chest mic, how do you read me” i ask. (Jeffs growly voice comes into my earpiece) “Loud and clear, good luck” he responds.
One odd thing i notice right away as my feet kick up against the rocks on the ground is that there is only one vehicle other than ours. A large bus. Slightly confused, i look in every direction while also investigating the bus. Seems as though it's empty. (Later i would learn everyone else met up at a different location and they all took the bus to get here).
Reaching the suspicious looking building, i reach for the door handle. As the door opens with little force, loud music hits me as well as bright flashing lights. What the hell? Walking around i find what i was looking for in a back room. “You're late , take your seat.” a well dressed man says (Seeing one empty seat left) Grabbing my laptop from the bag. Booting it up and joining the their local area network. Connection established. A strange software automatically downloads on my laptop.
The man who greeted me walks over to examine my screen. “We will wait until this participant is ready” (he tells everyone else) Minutes pass and the program has finished installing. What's on my screen is a D O D login showing the user name and password empty fields. “Ok everyone, your first task will be to crack the code and gain entry into this system. You have ten minutes to access the servers and find the login information. The first 10 people who accomplish this task will advance to the next round, good luck, your time starts now!” he explained.
A voice come over my earpiece once more .“Ok Barry, i'm linked up with your laptop, i can see everything you see. I will now control everything remotely. How do you read”? Jeff says quietly. “I hear you, I'll let you take over from here.” I reply. My colleague begins typing away like mad. It's been said he can type up to 153 words per minute. Looking at my screen, the computer is changing rapidly, each window appearing with different streams of code. (Almost like what you seen in the movie The Matrix) Which i suppose is a foreign language to most people. It can seem overwhelming at times. Normally. I would be doing this.
Jeff is far better and faster than i. It's not worth the risk. This task is far too important. There is much at stake here. As he continues going in through the firewall. More boxes open and close all over the screen. I appear as if im typing away. As there is a man walking around watching each potential hacker perform their duties. Not sure if it's the leader of this anonymous group. He is in a dark suit and all i can see is the flashes of light from each monitor.
Maybe it's just my paranoia but i feel like he keeps shooting me these awfully suspicious looks. Have to stay focused. Come on Barry. You need this. Concentrate! Keep your head in the game. I can't lose myself in the moment. Oh wait a minute, i just now remembered. I'm not even in control of my machine. Jeff, i sure as hell hope you know what you're doing…
“Barry, you DO know i just heard everything you said, right? Now shut the hell up and let me work. We only have 4 minutes left!!” Jeff urges. “Well then hurry up you lung cancer having prick, I'm dying in here. Must be 90 degrees” i whisper. Just then (Access granted) appears on my screen. The login information has been hacked. Instantly i jump up as if I've just won in BINGO. “I'm in!!!” I yell loudly to the man. He nods and another man comes over to confirm the legitimacy of my claim.
After confirmation is given a few moments later. Myself and several others are ushered to another room not first seen when you enter the building. First we are taken down a flight of unkempt stairs creaking and groaning with every step. Feeling as it could give out at any moment. Our group reaches the bottom of the stairs and are now on a platform. A mechanical whirring is heard as we now are being lowered even further underground. “Where the hell are we going”? One man asks in fear. “Silence fool”!! (Says the man in a nice dark suit) Finally the platform stops as i would approximate we are at least 80 feet underground.
A long dark hallway is before us. Lit dimly by low hanging lights. Which never seem to end as far as we can see. Walking for several minutes i no longer hear my associate in my ear piece. So i remove it quickly before anyone notices. There is a musty smell that has disturbed me immediately coming down here. It grows stronger the closer we get to the direction we are headed. Im last in line only in front of what i assess is a hired goon.
Stopping for a moment im pushed forward on my upper back near my shoulders. (I swear if i wasn't trying to save the world right now, I'd just take out my service pistol and blow this cocksucker away. No one would miss him) We reach a large old wooden door with absolutely no handle or markings of any kind. The leader pushes up against the wall near the door and it opens slowly. Everyone pours in single file line. There is a large wooden table with chairs almost like a conference room. “Take your seats please” the leader addresses. “You're all probably wondering what the hell we are doing down here, well you're here for a job. Also i didn't want any interference of any kind. Just in case the government is watching us. There's no way they could possibly hear what's being said this far underground.” He explains.
“Congratulations to each of you that has moved on to the next round. You 10 have been chosen to advance to the next stage in the competition. This following task will include various stages of difficulty. You will be chosen at random by a computer so it's completely fair. Each of you are to hack into some the world's largest banks and bring down their servers. Please come back to this location. Your names have been taken down and we shall contact you if anything changes. I expect to see all of you back with us .Same time next week. 6 days from now. That is all for now, thank you.”
The leader finishes and leaves the room first. Each man muttering and chatting loudly. I can hear only bits and pieces as everyone is talking loudly. Minutes pass and we are escorted out of the building. Everyone begins walking towards the bus. I veer towards my van and am stopped by the same man who pushed me earlier. “Just where the hell do you think you're going”? He asks. “Oh i didn't get the meet up spot, i had to drive here.” I respond while swatting away his hand from my shoulder. The man reaches in his pocket pulling out a card. “Be at this location and be on time or we will find someone else” the man urges. I snatch the card and stuff it into my wallet.
Reaching the van, i hop in and drive away. “What the hell happened in there”? Jeff demands. I begin informing him of everything that took place and explained the situation. He nods and tells me good work. Wait a minute, this doesn't look right. Jeff looks at me puzzled. Something is off. I don't remember any of this. Now there's a fork in the road. Is this the way we came? I thought i remembered it being only a one way in and one way out. “You went off the gravel road, move over,let me drive.” Jeff says. Hey sorry man, I'm a hacker. Not a tracker. Just get us the hell out of here. I'm more lost than Atlantis.
About an hour passes and Jeff somehow gets us out of the woods and back to the main road. We head back towards my house. But suddenly he makes a detour. “Screw this man. After all that i need a damn drink. You down”? Jeff asks. “Well in the words of my father, If you have time to think, you have time to drink” i utter proudly. (Then again dad was a major alcoholic, so perhaps that's bad advice) “Well alright then” jeff says as he floors the gas pedal.
Roughly 20 minutes later we arrive at his favourite bar where he immediately opens up a tab. I'm worried as I've heard he drinks like a fish. Not to mention we are both armed in a bar. (Yes that's illegal but screw you i am F B I. Remember folks, laws are made to be broken, otherwise, I'd be out of a job)
Crap i think i have lost my colleague. I begin walking around the establishment and am stunned to see this gorgeous blonde woman cross my path. We strike up a conversation and i soon forget about Jeff. (Meh oh well he is a grown man, i am sure he will be fine) She asks what i do for work and of course i lie. Never know when you need to run a background check on someone. Besides telling the whole world you're an undercover FBI agent isn't exactly the best idea. Or so the Bureau instructed us.
We continue chatting for a while and eventually part ways as it began to get late into the night we exchange numbers and she leaves gracefully. I walk outside to see the van still parked in the same spot. A bit puzzled i go over to inspect the van thinking maybe he just passed out in the front seat. I arrive at the driver's side door and open it to find all of our equipment gone and jeff is nowhere to be found. Freaking out i run back into the bar searching all over even behind the bar next to the register.
The bathrooms are empty and it's closing time. I have no idea where he went.. Did he leave with some one or was he was abducted possibly, either way i am completely dead if my supervisor finds out about this. I have to find him and the equipment. And who the hell was that girl, could she have something to do with this? I need answers. Oh no. I just realized, my laptop is also missing. If that information gets in the wrong hands. It could have catastrophic consequences…...
submitted by BeardedVeteran to DrCreepensVault [link] [comments]

Top crypto events over the last decade

Top crypto events over the last decade

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2020 marks a decade since cryptocurrency became a part of a daily routine. Mass adoption of crypto started with Bitcoin’s appearance in 2009. A lot has happened in the Crypto World since then. Now let’s take a look at the most significant events over the last crypto decade.
  • In 2009 the first block of Bitcoins was mined for a 50 Bitcoins reward. The same year there was the first Bitcoin hard fork which gave us Namecoin.
  • The first exchange appeared in 2010. It was bitcoinmarket.com which doesn’t exist anymore. The same year it was hacked for the first time. This unpleasant event showed the most obvious flaws in the system though. It was rather important to understand all the possible drawbacks, and right up to this moment a lot of efforts are taken to prevent accidents like these.
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  • 2010 was also a year when investors appeared. A lot of people are looking for an opportunity to invest in crypto now, but it has taken some time to learn that crypto can actually be an investment.
  • 2011 was a year of cryptocurrencies’ debuts. Swiftcoin appeared, and as a result of the second Bitcoin hard fork Litecoin came to the Crypto World.
  • In 2011, a physicist by training, 29-year-old Ross William Ulbricht, registered the Internet community called Silk Road on the anonymous Tor network. It has become one of the largest drug trafficking sites in the world. While the site was working, it managed to serve about a million customers, and the turnover of illicit substances exceeded $200 million. Almost all the payments were made in Bitcoins. In October 2013, the FBI closed the Silk Road and arrested 144,000 bitcoins, which at that time was about $100 million.
  • In 2012 people started talking about Bitcoin. It was even mentioned in some TV shows.
  • 2012 was marked by the birth of XRP.
  • By 2013 there were around 10 cryptocurrency assets.
  • In 2013 arguments about cryptocurrency regulation started. Countries had to find a way to deal with new technologies. Germany, Thailand, and China prohibited the use of cryptocurrencies. At the same time Canada launched the very first Bitcoin ATM.
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  • 2014 is famous for the biggest cryptocurrency exchange hack. 850 000 BTC was stolen when the Mt.Gox exchange was hacked.
  • In 2015 several new cryptocurrencies appeared. The Ethereum ecosystem was introduced. Thanks to Ethereum we use smart contracts now.
  • In 2015 the number of Bitcoin ATMs increased, and Argentina started to accept crypto as a payment for taxi rides.
  • In 2015 all the ICOs started. Augur was the first to do this.
  • Starting from 2015 more and more cryptocurrencies appeared. As a result we have 200 000 tokens running on smart contracts now.
  • In 2017 Japan decided to legalize Bitcoin as a payment method. In Norway Bitcoin became an authorized investment and payment.
  • 2017 is famous for the appearance of the most adorable blockchain project, CryptoKitties. It is not a currency, but an asset. The main thing that distinguishes CryptoKitties from all the other tokens is the uniqueness. Usually tokens are interchangeable. The value of your assets is expressed primarily in the number of tokens you have. The value of each CryptoKitty is different. What kinds of CryptoKitties you have is important. So, your only CryptoKitty may cost more than three CryptoKitties of another user. Nonetheless, CryptoKitties are in fact ERC-721 tokens built on the Ethereum blockchain. Everything is administered by smart contracts, and ETH is used for all transactions. CryptoKitties became very famous. Since December 2, new kitties appeared every 15 minutes. They became a powerful tool in showing people how to use blockchain technologies in a fun way. CryptoKitties were so attractive that at a certain moment in 2017 they congested the Ethereum network.
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  • 15 November 2018 was the time when BCH hard fork happened. It was a result of the inner conflict between two camps: Roger Ver and Jihan Wu on the one side, and Craig Steven Wright and Calvin Ayre on the other side. This discord was caused by different versions of software. The whole thing culminated in creating BCH with 32 MB block size limit and BSV (Bitcoin Satoshi’s Vision) with 128 MB block size limit.
  • 2018 was time for European countries to come together and discuss cryptocurrency regulation.
  • 2019 was not a good year for XRP. In June wallets that were hosted on Gatehub were hacked and 23 200 000 XRP was stolen. Upbit exchange did not have a great year either. It was hacked and lost 10 000 ETH.
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There were a lot of attempts to create a digital currency. Not all of them were successful. Finally, Bitcoin appeared and changed the world’s perception of the concept. It came a long way and became a whole industry. It is developing constantly involving more and more people on the way. The list of new cryptocurrencies is expanding rapidly. For the next decade there are still some problems to solve, but nonetheless the future of cryptocurrency seems to be extremely exciting.
submitted by SimpleSwapExchange to CryptoMarkets [link] [comments]

I'm an Undercover FBI Agent on the Deep Web.

Part one
My name is Special Agent “Barry Allen” . (Not my real name of course) It's actually my code name. Given to me by my colleagues. You may recognize this name from the comic book character “The Flash”. I was given this name due to my quickness to obtain IP addresses , bypass firewalls and hack into certain deep web sites and shut them down. That is my area of expertise.
However, I've also been assigned to a Joint Task Force before which tracked and arrested drug runners, firearms dealers and human trafficking rings. Believe it or not. The federal government is everywhere. Social media, Reddit, YouTube. You name it. We have our guys on it. We monitor everything. That being said, the FBI only has jurisdiction to operate within the borders of the United States.
In this new digital age we find ourselves living, Cybercrime is much more of a direct threat. Now more than ever…
Yes in the past we feared as a nation, biological and chemical warfare. As an example, right after 9/11 the United States had an Anthrax attack. In the FBI, it was known as “Amerithrax” Letters were mailed containing anthrax spores to several news media offices and to Democratic Senators Tom Daschle and Patrick Leahy, killing 5 people and infecting 17 others. Once the victim opened the letters they would immediately be exposed to the spores. Inhaling them is the most deadly form of the attacks. And it quickly destroys your immune and respiratory system's.Back then there were no known cures and it was difficult to treat as the symptoms often times confused doctors. The death rate once exposed was nearly 95% .No one was ever officially arrested or tried as the primary suspect for this horrific crime. If you ask me though, the scariest part of this investigation is where it led us….To a lab on an Army base. Essentially the US Army was weaponizing Anthrax using independent scientists specializing in microbiological warfare.
Of course though, if you wanted to bring down Western Civilization today , all you'd have to do is manipulate or destroy our satellites and we would be back in the dark ages. Computers, banks , grocery stores and cell phones, power plants, even the water filtration system runs with electronics and the ability to communicate with satellites.
Essentially, our world now depends on this. It's scary to think about. Especially when 14 year olds are hacking into the largest banks in the world from their mother's basement. Somehow they are able to bypass the best security systems we know of. (I personally believe they are using password skimmers) We joke in my department that in order to work for us, you simply only need to be smarter than a teenager.
My background is in IT while in the military. While serving i also obtained several certifications and degrees in my field..
I worked alongside someone i never thought i would. Turns out the federal government often times hires former hackers to “consult” for them. In fact they have an army of internet soldiers at their disposal. I was actually trained by a convicted felon. It's been said he is one of the best hackers in the world. Eventually i was put in contact with men in the FBI. Essentially went through a series of rigorous “tests” to determine my operating field of work. After seeing our skills, they then placed myself and the felon on the Cyber Anti-Terrorism unit (or CAT as we call it) .
Our first assignment was to locate a man on the Deep Web known only as “Captain Death” He runs this anonymous site in which the viewers would donate bitcoin to watch unspeakable acts of torture, mutilation and murder. Often times called “Red Rooms”. After searching for a while, clicking on every single link given to us, we found the exact link which directed us to the host site.We visited the website. For a moment the page was completely black. So we waited a few moments. Suddenly a bright red colored text appears across the top of the screen. “Welcome! To the house of pain, tonight's events will commence in 2 minutes. Enjoy” Looking over at my colleague, Jeff begins penetrating the sites security systems attempting to find the IP address of the hosts location. Viewing the site still with my eyes locked onto the screen. Using my laptop separate from Jeffs. The monitor goes black, Then a video attempts to load. Buffering now for several minutes. “Any luck Jeff”? I ask. “I'm searching for a weakness in the security firewall. Give me a minute” he responds. Frustrated i say, “We may not have a minute” Using access control, Jeff was able to find and manipulate the users login information bringing down the video before the it began. Believe it or not. One of the weakest points to a website can often times be it's login feature. Jeff found a vulnerability in the source codes software and exploited it. Still haven't found the guy. As that process is much more difficult. For now, we can rest a little bit easier knowing his account is compromised.
The best hack is when you can invade a security system and not ever be noticed. This was not one of those instances. “Who are you” appears on Jeff's computer screen. He responds quickly “The Dark Knight” in bold green text as he looks over the offenders account. Attempting to track down banking information. Recent transactions. Even bitcoin exchange.
Searching over the vast amount of data pouring into the site. Seems they have gone through great lengths to keep themselves hidden from the public. The Identity of the perp is still unknown. Patting Jeff on the shoulder i thank him for saving my eyes from witnessing god only knows what. I suppose for now it's a small victory. “Let's take a break Jeff” I urge. Shutting down our laptops we exit the dark cold room we sat in with monitors, computers, servers and many other electronic components all around us. One thing to remember, heat is the enemy of electronics. and for some strange reason, we enjoy freezing our asses off while hacking.
Walking outside Jeff lights up a cigarette and takes a drag. Putting on his sunglasses “Want one?” He asks “No thanks, they really break my concentration, I don't seem to function well with that in my system” i reply… he scoffs and quietly whispers (amateur) while choking and coughing. I smile and look up “Yeah well at least I can breathe” I say laughing. (A smile forming on ny face) We begin walking to a nearby restaurant. My phone lights up and rings loudly. It's my supervisor. “Go for Barry” I speak confidently. My boss is breathing heavily into the phone and says sternly “What's the News on Captain Death”? I begin to inform him on our progress and our struggles. “Keep me posted Barry, good work.” He says. (Not telling him Jeff did most of the work, i feel bad for taking credit for this one)
Reaching the doors of the bar and grill, I notice a man sitting in the corner of the restaurant with his family. Jumping back quickly while peering around the corner. Jeff gives me a strange look as I inform him that man is a fugitive from an earlier investigation. I call in for back up and sit back in our unmarked unit waiting for the Cavalry to arrive as he is armed and extremely dangerous. 15 minutes pass as back up swarms the parking lot. We exit the vehicle and surround the building. Rushing in 12 men strong, guns drawn we make the arrest. Fortunately, he did not resist. No civilians were harmed on the takedown.This man has been on the run for months moving from state to state. I had previously set up a sting operation to illegally buy stolen guns from the man which had been arranged through the deep web. However , this particular sting was an in-person arms deal. He appeared very spooked and got away from us before the transaction was made. After searching his panel van today we found an entire armory of weapons. A few days pass and we now have a search warrant issued by the judge for his last known address. Confiscating all of his computers, hard drives and weapons. My partner and I found a hidden room below the living room floor boards with $1.4 million dollars in it. It also had passports and other documents. He was ready to flee the country for sure. Why he was out in public is beyond me. Though often times, men like him feel they are untouchable and above the law.
It's several weeks later and work has been slow. (Not sure if that is good or bad) Until today that is, I began chatting on forums and meeting interesting characters in chat rooms. On the clear net and deep web. Today I met a dark shadowy figure online. He claims to have worked with a group of hackers who specializes in debit and credit card theft online. (Playing the part ask in a private chat) “How much does this pay?” Moments pass with no answer. I sit and wait for a response. A message appears with a link and a phone number. “Contact him for a trial run, if you do well. He'll set you up with further work” he writes. (Thinking for a moment, finally an adversary worth hunting) Typing quickly I say “Who is he, do you know him personally”? He responds rapidly and the text box closes after he writes “Rule number one, no names!” Fortunately I was able to copy the link and phone number before my computer screen went completely blank.
Reaching for the burner phone i recently acquired i begin dialing the number provided. It rings several times. No answer. So i check out the link i copied. Right before i click on it. My phone lights up and rings beside me forcing me to jump out of my seat. Startled i look at the cell phone. Mildly confused as it reads 'unknown number’. Quickly i answer the phone. A man on the other end speaks. “How did you find this number”? he asks. I inform him i was searching online for a while. Im new and im looking for work. “I was told you're the man to call if i wanted some action, i need the money” i implore. “Competition is next week, meet at this address, winner gets a spot on my team, if you think you're up for the test, be on time” he demands. I thank him and abruptly hang up.
Jeff comes over to my place. He has some info on low level guys in the fraudulent/stolen debit card scheme. Using an unmarked and totally not suspicious surveillance van. We follow a few men on their day to day operations. For the most part, this portion of our job is the worst. Very daunting and boring. Sitting and waiting isn't exactly glamourous as the movies depict it to be.
From what we can tell so far these men are using credit card skimmers. Victims of credit card skimming are completely blindsided by the theft. They notice fraudulent charges on their accounts or money withdrawn from their accounts, but their credit and debit cards never left their possession. How did the theft happen?
You may be wondering, what exactly is this? Credit card skimming is a type of credit card theft where crooks use a small device to steal credit card information in an otherwise legitimate credit or debit card transaction. When a credit or debit card is swiped through a skimmer, the device captures and stores all the details stored in the card's magnetic stripe. The stripe contains the credit card number and expiration date and the credit card holder's full name. Thieves use the stolen data to make fraudulent charges either online or with a counterfeit credit card.
These men have been using these small devices all over the local area and surrounding states as well. Targeting the nicer areas of town. Attaching the devices to the ATMs. Sitting a short distance away in their cars watching each victim approaching. Laughing all the way to the bank...so to speak. After several days of stake-outs. Out team makes the arrests. Finding blank cards, machines and large sums of cash on hand. After hours of interrogations we learn a much bigger scheme is in the works. The men inform us that they were merely a distraction for a much larger crime. My supervisor gives us clearance to make a deal with them. Lessening their charges if they are willing to cooperate. Speaking with the men for 3 more hours we learn what's really going on. The next few days are extremely tense as our offices try to warn all the banks and even get the media involved.
Calling every bank, big and small we alert them of the situation that cybercriminals are poised to carry out an “ATM cash-out,” an operation that gives thieves access to untold sums of money by bypassing security measures on an ATM. If successful, the operation has the potential to be a heist unlike any we’ve ever seen.
The FBI has obtained unspecified reporting indicating cyber criminals are planning to conduct a global Automated Teller Machine (ATM) cash-out scheme in the coming days, likely associated with an unknown card issuer breach and commonly referred to as an ‘unlimited operation‘.
These unlimited operations compromise financial institutions or payment processors by installing malware that allows hackers to exploit network access, allowing admin-level access. Once inside, they can disable fraud protection, raise maximum ATM withdrawal amounts (and transaction limits) and withdraw large sums of money. Millions, potentially.
All they’ll need to carry out the attack are debit and credit card numbers found on the dark web, and dummy cards, also known as “blanks,” to attach the numbers to.
The cyber criminals typically create fraudulent copies of legitimate cards by sending stolen card data to co-conspirators who imprint the data on reusable magnetic strip cards, such as gift cards purchased at retail stores. At a pre-determined time, the co-conspirators withdraw account funds from ATMs using these cards.
It's nearly a week later and im preparing for my tests. I have my laptop ready in its case. Im extremely nervous.The information given to me is that i am to meet at this very strange building on the outskirts of town. I have no idea what to expect. I must come in first place to become a member of the team and ultimately take down the leader of this cybercrime domestic terrorist.
If things go according to his plan.He could potentially put the entire country on its knees and our banking systems would completely collapse.Chaos and madness will spread like wildfires. Millions of people unable to access their money will riot and destroy stores. Stealing food and everything they can get their hands on. The police will be overrun and unable to do anything about it. The military would most certainly be called in an attempt to regain order. Mass hysteria ensues. To the extremes we have never seen before. I must stop him. Before its too late….
Part 2
The day has come and I just received the call I've long avoided. It is time. The competition for top tier hackers are meeting at this building in which i believed to have been abandoned. We are in the surveillance van. Heading towards our destination. Our equipment is all packed up. Wearing a wire on my chest. (Hopefully they don't pat me down upon entry) Jeff is driving recklessly, as he has a bad habit of being late. Testing the audio in the back of the van. Generally this is done days before an operation. However, we are rather short on time. (Not pointing any fingers)
Leaving the city limits, we now enter a heavily wooded area. There is only one way in. The road is turning into rubble. Small rocks are shooting from our tires .Lights are fading behind us as we venture further into the forest. Jeff now using high beams. We notice it's grown quiet. Other than hearing the tires on the gravel road. There seems to be less and less wildlife in the area. I got this feeling like we are being watched.
Checking my cell phone, we have lost all signal. (Is this a trap)? i thought . Our other equipment seems to work just fine. I can begin to see dim lights in the distance. We must be nearing the competition. “You ready for this?” (Jeff asks while blowing smoke out the window) I start to swat the backdraft of the smoke billowing back into my window. “Yeah, I'm ready, you should really consider cutting back on the smokes.” I utter. Just then, a pack of Marlboros are hurled in my direction. “We're here , Barry. Make sure you have everything.” (Jeff commands) “I'm all set.” I reply.
Jeff stops the Van on the gravel. Exiting the vehicle, i grab my backpack while adjusting my clothes. (I found some glasses with regular lens in them, so as to ‘look the part’) Walking towards the building i speak quietly into my chest microphone. “Test, test chest mic, how do you read me” i ask. (Jeffs growly voice comes into my earpiece) “Loud and clear, good luck” he responds.
One odd thing i notice right away as my feet kick up against the rocks on the ground is that there is only one vehicle other than ours. A large bus. Slightly confused, i look in every direction while also investigating the bus. Seems as though it's empty. (Later i would learn everyone else met up at a different location and they all took the bus to get here).
Reaching the suspicious looking building, i reach for the door handle. As the door opens with little force, loud music hits me as well as bright flashing lights. What the hell? Walking around i find what i was looking for in a back room. “You're late , take your seat.” a well dressed man says (Seeing one empty seat left) Grabbing my laptop from the bag. Booting it up and joining the their local area network. Connection established. A strange software automatically downloads on my laptop.
The man who greeted me walks over to examine my screen. “We will wait until this participant is ready” (he tells everyone else) Minutes pass and the program has finished installing. What's on my screen is a D O D login showing the user name and password empty fields. “Ok everyone, your first task will be to crack the code and gain entry into this system. You have ten minutes to access the servers and find the login information. The first 10 people who accomplish this task will advance to the next round, good luck, your time starts now!” he explained.
A voice come over my earpiece once more .“Ok Barry, i'm linked up with your laptop, i can see everything you see. I will now control everything remotely. How do you read”? Jeff says quietly. “I hear you, I'll let you take over from here.” I reply. My colleague begins typing away like mad. It's been said he can type up to 153 words per minute. Looking at my screen, the computer is changing rapidly, each window appearing with different streams of code. (Almost like what you seen in the movie The Matrix) Which i suppose is a foreign language to most people. It can seem overwhelming at times. Normally. I would be doing this.
Jeff is far better and faster than i. It's not worth the risk. This task is far too important. There is much at stake here. As he continues going in through the firewall. More boxes open and close all over the screen. I appear as if im typing away. As there is a man walking around watching each potential hacker perform their duties. Not sure if it's the leader of this anonymous group. He is in a dark suit and all i can see is the flashes of light from each monitor.
Maybe it's just my paranoia but i feel like he keeps shooting me these awfully suspicious looks. Have to stay focused. Come on Barry. You need this. Concentrate! Keep your head in the game. I can't lose myself in the moment. Oh wait a minute, i just now remembered. I'm not even in control of my machine. Jeff, i sure as hell hope you know what you're doing…
“Barry, you DO know i just heard everything you said, right? Now shut the hell up and let me work. We only have 4 minutes left!!” Jeff urges. “Well then hurry up you lung cancer having prick, I'm dying in here. Must be 90 degrees” i whisper. Just then (Access granted) appears on my screen. The login information has been hacked. Instantly i jump up as if I've just won in BINGO. “I'm in!!!” I yell loudly to the man. He nods and another man comes over to confirm the legitimacy of my claim.
After confirmation is given a few moments later. Myself and several others are ushered to another room not first seen when you enter the building. First we are taken down a flight of unkempt stairs creaking and groaning with every step. Feeling as it could give out at any moment. Our group reaches the bottom of the stairs and are now on a platform. A mechanical whirring is heard as we now are being lowered even further underground. “Where the hell are we going”? One man asks in fear. “Silence fool”!! (Says the man in a nice dark suit) Finally the platform stops as i would approximate we are at least 80 feet underground.
A long dark hallway is before us. Lit dimly by low hanging lights. Which never seem to end as far as we can see. Walking for several minutes i no longer hear my associate in my ear piece. So i remove it quickly before anyone notices. There is a musty smell that has disturbed me immediately coming down here. It grows stronger the closer we get to the direction we are headed. Im last in line only in front of what i assess is a hired goon.
Stopping for a moment im pushed forward on my upper back near my shoulders. (I swear if i wasn't trying to save the world right now, I'd just take out my service pistol and blow this cocksucker away. No one would miss him) We reach a large old wooden door with absolutely no handle or markings of any kind. The leader pushes up against the wall near the door and it opens slowly. Everyone pours in single file line. There is a large wooden table with chairs almost like a conference room. “Take your seats please” the leader addresses. “You're all probably wondering what the hell we are doing down here, well you're here for a job. Also i didn't want any interference of any kind. Just in case the government is watching us. There's no way they could possibly hear what's being said this far underground.” He explains.
“Congratulations to each of you that has moved on to the next round. You 10 have been chosen to advance to the next stage in the competition. This following task will include various stages of difficulty. You will be chosen at random by a computer so it's completely fair. Each of you are to hack into some the world's largest banks and bring down their servers. Please come back to this location. Your names have been taken down and we shall contact you if anything changes. I expect to see all of you back with us .Same time next week. 6 days from now. That is all for now, thank you.”
The leader finishes and leaves the room first. Each man muttering and chatting loudly. I can hear only bits and pieces as everyone is talking loudly. Minutes pass and we are escorted out of the building. Everyone begins walking towards the bus. I veer towards my van and am stopped by the same man who pushed me earlier. “Just where the hell do you think you're going”? He asks. “Oh i didn't get the meet up spot, i had to drive here.” I respond while swatting away his hand from my shoulder. The man reaches in his pocket pulling out a card. “Be at this location and be on time or we will find someone else” the man urges. I snatch the card and stuff it into my wallet.
Reaching the van, i hop in and drive away. “What the hell happened in there”? Jeff demands. I begin informing him of everything that took place and explained the situation. He nods and tells me good work. Wait a minute, this doesn't look right. Jeff looks at me puzzled. Something is off. I don't remember any of this. Now there's a fork in the road. Is this the way we came? I thought i remembered it being only a one way in and one way out. “You went off the gravel road, move over,let me drive.” Jeff says. Hey sorry man, I'm a hacker. Not a tracker. Just get us the hell out of here. I'm more lost than Atlantis.
About an hour passes and Jeff somehow gets us out of the woods and back to the main road. We head back towards my house. But suddenly he makes a detour. “Screw this man. After all that i need a damn drink. You down”? Jeff asks. “Well in the words of my father, If you have time to think, you have time to drink” i utter proudly. (Then again dad was a major alcoholic, so perhaps that's bad advice) “Well alright then” jeff says as he floors the gas pedal.
Roughly 20 minutes later we arrive at his favourite bar where he immediately opens up a tab. I'm worried as I've heard he drinks like a fish. Not to mention we are both armed in a bar. (Yes that's illegal but screw you i am F B I. Remember folks, laws are made to be broken, otherwise, I'd be out of a job)
Crap i think i have lost my colleague. I begin walking around the establishment and am stunned to see this gorgeous blonde woman cross my path. We strike up a conversation and i soon forget about Jeff. (Meh oh well he is a grown man, i am sure he will be fine) She asks what i do for work and of course i lie. Never know when you need to run a background check on someone. Besides telling the whole world you're an undercover FBI agent isn't exactly the best idea. Or so the Bureau instructed us.
We continue chatting for a while and eventually part ways as it began to get late into the night we exchange numbers and she leaves gracefully. I walk outside to see the van still parked in the same spot. A bit puzzled i go over to inspect the van thinking maybe he just passed out in the front seat. I arrive at the driver's side door and open it to find all of our equipment gone and jeff is nowhere to be found. Freaking out i run back into the bar searching all over even behind the bar next to the register.
The bathrooms are empty and it's closing time. I have no idea where he went.. Did he leave with some one or was he was abducted possibly, either way i am completely dead if my supervisor finds out about this. I have to find him and the equipment. And who the hell was that girl, could she have something to do with this? I need answers. Oh no. I just realized, my laptop is also missing. If that information gets in the wrong hands. It could have catastrophic consequences…...
submitted by BeardedVeteran to mrcreeps [link] [comments]

A few stories about Brian Krebs: The independent cybercrime journalist who exposes criminals on the internet

First, a bit of introduction before we get into the living drama that is Brian Krebs.
Brian Krebs has been a journalist for decades, starting in the late 90s. He got his start at The Washington Post, but what he's most famous for are his exposes on criminal businesses and individuals who perpetuate cyber crime worldwide. In 2001, he got his interest in cybercrime piqued when a computer worm locked him out of his own computer. In 2005, he shifted from working as a staff writer at The Washington Post's tech newswire to writing for their security blog, "Security Wire". During his tenure there, he started by focusing on the victims of cybercrime, but later also started to focus on the perpetrators of it as well. His reporting helped lead to the shutdown of McColo, a hosting provider who provided service to some of the world's biggest spammers and hackers. Reports analyzing the shutdown of McColo estimated that global spam volume dropped by between 40 and 70 percent. Further analysis revealed it also played host to child pornography sites, and the Russian Business Network, a major Russian cybercrime ring.
In 2009, Krebs left to start his own site, KrebsOnSecurity. Since then, he's been credited with being the first to report on major events such as Stuxnet and when Target was breached, resulting in the leakage of 40 million cards. He also regularly investigates and reveals criminals' identities on his site. The latter has made him the bane of the world of cybercrime, as well as basically a meme, where criminals will include references like Made by Brian Krebs in their code, or name their shops full of stolen credit cards after him.
One of his first posts on his new site was a selection of his best work. While not particularly dramatic, they serve as an excellent example of dogged investigative work, and his series reveal the trail of takedowns his work has documented, or even contributed to.
And now, a selection of drama involving Krebs. Note, all posts are sarcastically-tinged retellings of the source material which I will link throughout. I also didn't use the real names in my retellings, but they are in the source material. This took way too long to write, and it still does massively condense the events described in the series. Krebs has been involved with feuds with other figures, but I'd argue these tales are the "main" bits of drama that are most suited for here.

Fly on the Wall

By 2013, Krebs was no stranger to cybercriminals taking the fight to the real world. He was swatted previously to the point where the police actually know to give him a ring and see if there'd actually been a murder, or if it was just those wacky hackers at it again. In addition, his identity was basically common knowledge to cybercriminals, who would open lines of credit in his name, or find ways to send him money using stolen credit cards.
However, one particular campaign against him caught his eye. A hacker known as "Fly" aka "Flycracker" aka "MUXACC1" posted on a Russian-language fraud forum he administered about a "Krebs fund". His plan was simple. Raise Bitcoin to buy Heroin off of a darknet marketplace, address it to Krebs, and alert his local police via a spoofed phone call. Now, because Krebs is an investigative journalist, he develops undercover presences on cybercrime forums, and it just so happened he'd built up a presence on this one already.
Guys, it became known recently that Brian Krebs is a heroin addict and he desperately needs the smack, so we have started the "Helping Brian Fund", and shortly we will create a bitcoin wallet called "Drugs for Krebs" which we will use to buy him the purest heroin on the Silk Road. My friends, his withdrawal is very bad, let’s join forces to help the guy! We will save Brian from the acute heroin withdrawal and the world will get slightly better!
Fly had first caught Krebs' attention by taunting him on Twitter, sending him Tweets including insults and abuse, and totally-legit looking links. Probably either laced with malware, or designed to get Krebs' IP. He also took to posting personal details such as Krebs' credit report, directions to his house, and pictures of his front door on LiveJournal, of all places.
So, after spotting the scheme, he alerted his local police that he'd probably have someone sending him some China White. Sure enough, the ne'er-do-wells managed to raise 2 BTC, which at the time was a cool $200 or so. They created an account on the premiere darknet site at the time, The Silk Road under the foolproof name "briankrebs7". They found one seller who had consistently high reviews, but the deal fell through for unknown reasons. My personal theory is the seller decided to Google where it was going, and realized sending a gram of dope into the waiting arms of local law enforcement probably wasn't the best use of his time. Still, the forum members persevered, and found another seller who was running a buy 10 get 2 free promotion. $165 of Bitcoin later, the drugs were on their way to a new home. The seller apparently informed Fly that the shipment should arrive by Tuesday, a fact which he gleefully shared with the forum.
While our intrepid hero had no doubt that the forum members were determined to help him grab the tail of the dragon, he's not one to assume without confirmation, and enlisted the help of a graduate student at UCSD who was researching Bitcoin and anonymity on The Silk Road, and confirmed the address shared by Fly was used to deposit 2 BTC into an account known to be used for money management on the site.
By Monday, an envelope from Chicago had arrived, containing a copy of Chicago confidential. Taped inside were tiny baggies filled with the purported heroin. Either dedicated to satisfied customers, or mathematically challenged, the seller had included thirteen baggies instead of the twelve advertised. A police officer arrived to take a report and whisked the baggies away.
Now, Fly was upset that Krebs wasn't in handcuffs for drug possession, and decided to follow up his stunt by sending Krebs a floral arrangement shaped like a cross, and an accompanying threatening message addressed to his wife, the dire tone slightly undercut by the fact that it was signed "Velvet Crabs". Krebs' curiosity was already piqued from the shenanigans with the heroin, but with the arrival of the flowers decided to dive deeper into the сука behind things.
He began digging into databases from carding sites that had been hacked, but got his first major breakthrough to his identity from a Russian computer forensics firm. Fly had maintained an account on a now-defunct hacking forum, whose database was breached under "Flycracker". It turns out, the email Flycracker had used was also hacked at some point, and a source told Krebs that the email was full of reports from a keylogger Fly had installed on his wife's computer. Now, because presumably his wife wasn't part of, or perhaps even privy to her husband's illicit dealings, her email account happened to be her full legal name, which Krebs was able to trace to her husband. Now, around this time, the site Fly maintained disappeared from the web, and administrators on another major fraud forum started purging his account. This is a step they typically take when they suspect a member has been apprehended by authorities. Nobody knew for sure, but they didn't want to take any chances.
More research by Krebs revealed that the criminals' intuition had been correct, and Fly was arrested in Italy, carrying documents under an assumed name. He was sitting in an Italian jail, awaiting potential extradition to the United States, as well as potentially facing charges in Italy. This was relayed to Krebs by a law enforcement official who simply said "The Fly has been swatted". (Presumably while slowly removing a pair of aviator sunglasses)
While Fly may have been put away, the story between Krebs and Fly wasn't quite over. He did end up being extradited to the US for prosecution, but while imprisoned in Italy, Fly actually started sending Krebs letters. Understandably distrustful after the whole "heroin" thing, his contacts in federal law enforcement tested the letter, and found it to be clean. Inside, there was a heartfelt and personal letter, apologizing for fucking with Krebs in so many ways. He also forgave Krebs for posting his identity online, leading him to muse that perhaps Fly was working through a twelve-step program. In December, he received another letter, this time a simple postcard with a cheerful message wishing him a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Krebs concluded his post thusly:
Cybercrooks have done some pretty crazy stuff to me in response to my reporting about them. But I don’t normally get this kind of closure. I look forward to meeting with Fly in person one day soon now that he will be just a short train ride away. And he may be here for some time: If convicted on all charges, Fly faces up to 30 years in U.S. federal prison.
Fly ultimately was extradited. He plead guilty and was sentenced to 41 months in jail

vDOS and Mirai Break The Internet

Criminals are none too happy when they find their businesses and identities on the front page of KrebsOnSecurity. It usually means law enforcement isn't far behind. One such business was known as vDOS. A DDOS-for-hire (also known as a "booter" or a "stresser") site that found itself hacked, with all their customer records still in their databases leaked. Analysis of the records found that in a four-month time span, the service had been responsible for about 8.81 years worth of attack time, meaning on average at any given second, there were 26 simultaneous attacks running. Interestingly, the hack of vDOS came about from another DDOS-for-hire site, who as it turns out was simply reselling services provided by vDOS. They were far from the only one. vDOS appeared to provide firepower to a large number of different resellers.
In addition to the attack logs, support messages were also among the data stolen. This contained some complaints from various clients who complained they were unable to launch attacks against Israeli IPs. This is a common tactic by hackers to try and avoid unwanted attention from authorities in their country of residence. This was confirmed when two men from Israel were arrested for their involvement in owning and running vDOS. However, this was just the beginning for this bit of drama.
The two men arrested went by the handles "applej4ck" and "Raziel". They had recently published a paper on DDOS attack methods in an online Israeli security magazine. Interestingly, on the same day the men were arrested, questioned, and released on bail, vDOS went offline. Not because it had been taken down by Israeli authorities, not because they had shut it down themselves, but because a DDOS protection firm, BackConnect Security, had hijacked the IP addresses belonging to the company. To spare a lot of technical detail, it's called a BGP hijack, and it basically works by a company saying "Yeah, those are our addresses." It's kind of amazing how much of the internet is basically just secured by the digital equivalent of pinky swears. You can read some more technical detail on Wikipedia. Anyway, we'll get back to BackConnect.
Following the publication of the story uncovering the inner workings of vDOS, KrebsOnSecurity was hit with a record breaking DDOS attack, that peaked at 620/Gbps, nearly double the most powerful DDOS attack previously on record. To put that in perspective, that's enough bandwidth to download 5 simultaneous copies of Interstellar in 4K resolution every single second, and still have room to spare. The attack was so devastating, Akamai, one of the largest providers of DDOS protection in the world had to drop Krebs as a pro bono client. Luckily, Google was willing to step in and place his site under the protection of Google's Project Shield, a free service designed to protect the news sites and journalists from being knocked offline by DDOS attacks.
This attack was apparently in retaliation for the vDOS story, since some of the data sent in the attack included the string "freeapplej4ck". The attack was executed by a botnet of Internet of Things (or IoT) devices. These are those "smart" devices like camera systems, routers, DVRs. Basically things that connect to the cloud. An astounding amount of those are secured with default passwords that can be easily looked up from various sites or even the manufacturers' websites. This was the start of a discovery of a massive botnet that had been growing for years.
Now time for a couple quick side stories:
Dyn, a company who provides DNS to many major companies including Twitter, Reddit, and others came under attack, leaving many sites (including Twitter and Reddit) faltering in the wake of it. Potentially due to one of their engineers' collaboration with Krebs on another story. It turned out that the same botnet that attacked Krebs' site was at least part of the attack on Dyn
And back to BackConnect, that DDOS protection firm that hijacked the IP addresses from vDOS. Well it turns out BGP Hijacks are old hat for the company. They had done it at least 17 times before. Including at least once (purportedly with permission) for the address 1.3.3.7. Aka, "leet". It turns out one of the co-founders of BackConnect actually posted screenshots of him visiting sites that tell you your public IP address in a DDOS mitigation industry chat, showing it as 1.3.3.7. They also used a BGP Hijack against a hosting company and tried to frame a rival DDOS mitigation provider.
Finally, another provider, Datawagon was interestingly implicated in hosting DDOS-for-hire sites while offering DDOS protection. In a Skype conversation where the founder of Datawagon wanted to talk about that time he registered dominos.pizza and got sued for it, he brings up scanning the internet for vulnerable routers completely unprompted. Following the publication of the story about BackConnect, in which he was included in, he was incensed about his portrayal, and argued with Krebs over Skype before Krebs ultimately ended up blocking him. He was subsequently flooded with fake contact requests from bogus or hacked Skype accounts. Shortly thereafter, the record-breaking DDOS attack rained down upon his site.
Back to the main tale!
So, it turns out the botnet of IoT devices was puppeteered by a malware called Mirai. How did it get its name? Well, that's the name its creator gave it, after an anime called Mirai Nikki. How did this name come to light? The creator posted the source code online. (The name part, not the origin. The origin didn't come 'til later.) The post purported that they'd picked it up from somewhere in their travels as a DDOS industry professional. It turns out this is a semi-common tactic when miscreants fear that law enforcement might come looking for them, and having the only copy of the source code of a malware in existence is a pretty strong indicator that you have something to do with it. So, releasing the source to the world gives a veneer of plausible deniability should that eventuality come to pass. So who was this mysterious benefactor of malware source? They went by the name "Anna-senpai".
As research on the Mirai botnet grew, and more malware authors incorporated parts of Mirai's source code into their own attacks, attention on the botnet increased, and on the people behind it. The attention was presumably the reason why Hackforums, the forum where the source code was posted, later disallowed ostensible "Server Stress Tester" services from being sold on it. By December, "Operation Tarpit" had wrought 34 arrests and over a hundred "knock and talk" interviews questioning people about their involvement.
By January, things started to come crashing down. Krebs published an extensive exposé on Anna-senpai detailing all the evidence linking them to the creation of Mirai. The post was so big, he included a damn glossary. What sparked the largest botnet the internet had ever seen? Minecraft. Minecraft servers are big business. A popular one can earn tens of thousands of dollars per month from people buying powers, building space, or other things. It's also a fiercely competitive business, with hundreds of servers vying for players. It turns out that things may have started, as with another set of companies, two rival DDOS mitigation providers competing for customers. ProTraf was a provider of such mitigation technology, and a company whose owner later worked for ProTraf had on at least one occasion hijacked addresses belonging to another company, ProxyPipe. ProxyPipe had also been hit with DDOS attacks they suspected to be launched by ProTraf.
While looking into the President of ProTraf, Krebs realized he'd seen the relatively uncommon combination of programming languages and skills posted by the President somewhere else. They were shared by Anna-senpai on Hackforums. As Krebs dug deeper and deeper into Anna-senpai's online presence, he uncovered other usernames, including one he traced to some Minecraft forums where a photoshopped picture of a still from Pulp Fiction contained the faces of BackConnect, which was a rival to ProTraf's DDOS mitigation business, and another face. A hacker by the name of Vyp0r, who another employee of ProTraf claimed betrayed his trust and blackmailed him into posting the source of another piece of malware called Bashlite. There was also a third character photoshopped into the image. An anime character named "Yamada" from a movie called B Gata H Hei.
Interestingly, under the same username, Krebs found a "MyAnimeList" profile which, out of 9 titles it had marked as watched, were B Gata H Hei, as well as Mirai Nikki, the show from which Mirai derived its name. It continues on with other evidence, including DDOS attacks against Rutgers University, but in short, there was little doubt in the identity of "Anna-senpai", but the person behind the identity did contact Krebs to comment. He denied any involvement in Mirai or DDOS attacks.
"I don’t think there are enough facts to definitively point the finger at me," [Anna-senpai] said. "Besides this article, I was pretty much a nobody. No history of doing this kind of stuff, nothing that points to any kind of sociopathic behavior. Which is what the author is, a sociopath."
He did, however, correct Krebs on the name of B Gata H Kei.
Epilogue
Needless to say, the Mirai botnet crew was caught, but managed to avoid jailtime thanks to their cooperation with the government. That's not to say they went unpunished. Anna-senpai was sentenced to 6 months confinement, 2500 hours of community service, and they may have to pay up to $8.6 million in restitution for their attacks on Rutgers university.

Other Stories

I don't have the time or energy to write another effortpost, and as is I'm over 20,000 characters, so here's a few other tidbits of Krebs' clashes with miscreants.
submitted by HereComesMyDingDong to internetdrama [link] [comments]

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